The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown

The Da Vinci Code

A fascinating and absorbing thriller -- perfect for history buffs, conspiracy nuts, puzzle lovers or anyone who appreciates a great, riveting story.While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher....

Title:The Da Vinci Code
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Da Vinci Code Reviews

  • Mer

    PLEASE do NOT recommend The Da Vinci Code to me because you think it's brilliant. Please do not try to explain to me that it is a "really interesting and eye-opening book." Just don't. Please.

    I've read Iain Pear, I heart Foucault's Pendulum, Dashiell Hammett is my hero, Alan Moore is My Absolute Favorite, I listen to Coil on a fairly regular basis, and cloak n' dagger secret society/Priory of Sion/Knights of Templar-tinged num nums make me a very happy girl... but if you truly believe that Brow

    PLEASE do NOT recommend The Da Vinci Code to me because you think it's brilliant. Please do not try to explain to me that it is a "really interesting and eye-opening book." Just don't. Please.

    I've read Iain Pear, I heart Foucault's Pendulum, Dashiell Hammett is my hero, Alan Moore is My Absolute Favorite, I listen to Coil on a fairly regular basis, and cloak n' dagger secret society/Priory of Sion/Knights of Templar-tinged num nums make me a very happy girl... but if you truly believe that Brown's stupid airport thriller has ANY right whatsoever to be placed in the same category with Michael "Wooden Dildo Dialogue" Crichton, let alone Umberto Eco, kindly keep this opinion very far away from me, or the ensuing conversation we have will not be constructive or polite in any way.

    I loathe Dan Brown. I resent him for spoon-feeding the masses pseudo-intellectual "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" D-grade thriller shite under a pretense of real sophistication, and getting orally serviced by The New York Times for his effort.

    I'd heard that the novel was meticulously researched and contained some really interesting and controversial assessments of religious zealotry. Um, not really? Well, not by my Merovingian standards, anyway. :D

    Let's put it this way. If Dan Brown was teaching an Insurgent Christian Symbolism in Art and Literature 101 class at my local community college, I'd definitely have a different opinion about him.

    But NO. Dan Brown is not a professor of anything but pap. He is a barely competent thriller writer who wrote an AWFUL book that I could not bear to finish because I felt my IQ plummeting a little further with every "Let's Go to Paris! Guidebook" description and blowhard authorial essay. Oh, don't even get me started about those cute soliloquies the main characters are so fond of delivering, ever so calmly, often while cops n' bovvers are chasing them.

    The characters are weakly drawn. The dialogue is excruciating. The research is shoddy and self-serving at best. The plot, no matter how open-minded you are, is beyond ludicrous. It's laughable enough to be incorporated into the next Indiana Jones movie. That'd be sweet, dude.

    What really irks me are Dan Brown's sanctimonious interviews, wherein he shows off all of his priceless antiques while expressing his abiding convictions that the American public needs a "deeper appreciation" of art and history and culture. What a shallow, self-aggrandizing hypocrite. I'm all for fictional subversion of the dominant Catholic paradigm, but only if the subverter knows what the hell they're talking about. Brown DOESN'T. He's all "la la la, connect the dots" but the picture he comes up with is awkward and unconvincing.

    The DaVinci Choad is a dead easy, nay, downright lazy read, and yet droves of people are patting themselves on the back for having read and *gasp* actually understood it. Like this is some spectacular achievement? WHY? What, because the slipcover describes it as "erudite"? Are you fucking kidding me?

    Don't believe the hype, kids. You are profoundly more intelligent than this holiday page-turner gives you credit for.

    If you really, honestly, just plain liked the book, that's cool I guess. Maybe you also prefer Anne Geddes to Alfred Stieglitz, Kenny G to Sidney Bechet, John Tesh to Igor Stravinsky. Your prerogative. Just.... please don't try to tell me that this is "fascinating" or "meaningful literature". Frickin' read The Club Dumas or something. Then we'll talk, and I won't want to shoot myself in the face.

    Alright, glad I purged that poison from my system. Carry on.

  • ryan

    most of us have heard of this controverisal book. it takes an open minded person to read this and to remember it is just fiction. but it brings up a lot of important questions about the Christian church, and the loss of paganism and the respect of the Goddess or the Woman.

    I don't care if I am the only one who likes this book. it is my own truth, and i will think what i want to think. Dan Brown didn't LEAD me or anyone else. he OPENED our minds. simply and importantly...he was just a catalyst fo

    most of us have heard of this controverisal book. it takes an open minded person to read this and to remember it is just fiction. but it brings up a lot of important questions about the Christian church, and the loss of paganism and the respect of the Goddess or the Woman.

    I don't care if I am the only one who likes this book. it is my own truth, and i will think what i want to think. Dan Brown didn't LEAD me or anyone else. he OPENED our minds. simply and importantly...he was just a catalyst for different thinking. that is a good thing...poorly written or not.

    if you finish the book you will notice that Dan Brown even makes it clear to readers through his characters words, that he doesn't want to destroy christianity because it has done so much good for so many people, and if it works for them, let's let them continue to do what works for them. but find your own path.

    if you were or are a Christian ask yourself about the topics in this book. They are so eye opening. Jesus having a baby? totally possible...never thought of it before. never thought of it. is it true? who knows. Things like this are happening all the time today...Weapons of Mass destruction in Iraq? sound familiar? Maybe the church repressed information LIKE this because it was a threat to the church. totally possible. The catholic church creating the biblical canon with a political agenda to wipe out paganism? actually this seems to be a fact. women being oppressed due to the fear of religous zealot men in power losing their power...never looked at it that way. but this seems to be a fact too. is it helpful in broadening my perspective of the fact that christianity is just a religion made by fallible people. it sure is. does it open my mind to other faiths like paganism, judiasm, islam, bhuddism, and want to take the truths from all of them, and then THINK FOR MYSELF and figure out my own truth. it sure does...and that is what this book has probably done for many other people. why do you think Dan Brown's book was on the bestseller list for so long...and became a movie...obviously it was doing some good.

  • J.G. Keely

    A thriller devoid of pacing or exciting language. A mystery devoid of clues, foreshadowing, or facts. A tell-all of half-truths based upon a forged document written by a schizophrenic conman. A character-driven modern novel devoid of character. The second draft of Angels and Demons. Page-turning action thanks to the literary equivalent of pulling out at the moment of orgasm. A spiritual awakening built on new-age conspiracy theory. This book is many things, and none of them good, new, or interes

    A thriller devoid of pacing or exciting language. A mystery devoid of clues, foreshadowing, or facts. A tell-all of half-truths based upon a forged document written by a schizophrenic conman. A character-driven modern novel devoid of character. The second draft of Angels and Demons. Page-turning action thanks to the literary equivalent of pulling out at the moment of orgasm. A spiritual awakening built on new-age conspiracy theory. This book is many things, and none of them good, new, or interesting. However, it is an excellent litmus test for idealistic delusion.

    Upon the first reading, I must admit I found it a bit interesting, but then I turned the final page, and there was no bibliography. No explanation of how the author became familiar with all the concepts he claimed to 'faithfully portray'. He wrote this book and pretended it was a history book, and then refused to support it in any way. And any history you can't check up on is a bad one.

    He's no better than James Frey. In fact, he may be worse, since I know people who base their religious beliefs on this book, whereas Frey's only crime was wishing he was Scarface. And really, what macho thirtysomething male doesn't?

    Brown had good reasons for hiding his sources: they were forged by con-man Pierre Plantard and snuck into the Bibliotheque National in Paris back in the seventies. And it's not like Plantard got away with it, either--the whole 'Priory of Sion' thing was debunked thirty years before this book was even written.

    The artistic 'iconography' that figures heavily into the mystery is also completely made-up, and was declared ludicrous by an art history professor of my acquaintance. There are a lot of well-known symbols and allusions in classic art, but none of them resemble Brown's claims. The whole hinge on which the plot turns--the notion that an inverted triangle is automatically symbolic of women--makes about as much sense as declaring that the use of the swastika by 3rd century, BC Buddhists was proof that they were fascists.

    The rest of Brown's book is filled with the sort of cliched religious conspiracies you get from your first year as a theology student. Not only that, but these conspiracies were already explored by better writers in

    and the

    .

    Well, I've already done more legitimate historical research on this review than Brown did in his whole book, so I guess I'll call it a day.

  • Jim

    This is a pretty formulaic page turner, a fun quick read. Written at about the level of the average Nancy Drew mystery, it is best appreciated at that level. As far as the content, there are howlers on virtually every page (starting with the hero who looks like "Harrison Ford in Harris tweed" and is a "Professor of Religious Symbology at Harvard" -- good work if you can find it). You have to ignore very pulpy, cheesy writing to enjoy this romantic thriller.

    Intended as a book that a dedicated rea

    This is a pretty formulaic page turner, a fun quick read. Written at about the level of the average Nancy Drew mystery, it is best appreciated at that level. As far as the content, there are howlers on virtually every page (starting with the hero who looks like "Harrison Ford in Harris tweed" and is a "Professor of Religious Symbology at Harvard" -- good work if you can find it). You have to ignore very pulpy, cheesy writing to enjoy this romantic thriller.

    Intended as a book that a dedicated reader could finish in a day, or something you take to the beach and casually finish in a weekend,

    makes for a reasonable airline novel, so much so that it is often a bit clunky in its desire to ensure that no intellectual effort on the reader's part will be required. Here's a recurring example in this novel: a bit of unfamiliar terminology, say "crux gemmata" (jeweled cross) will will be explained on page N, then on page N+1, a character will finger his jeweled cross and explain, "Oh, yes -- this is a crux gemmata." I've read dinner menus that were more demanding on the reader. My wife and I both read about a third of it in a day, sharing the same copy, and that's a full work day plus taking care of kids, bedtime, etc. That's also a kind of virtue, I guess -- it's fast and peppy.

    As far as history goes, Dan Brown apparently thinks that "most historians" give credence to the hoary forgeries and frauds promoted in sensationalist best-sellers like

    . This author gets the best of both worlds: simultaneously claiming that "it's just fiction," while introducing the novel with claims that the historical record contained within is "fact." That claim is ridiculous. To pluck a random example, he spends some time talking about the Council of Nicaea, and incorrectly summarizes it as the origin of the doctrine of Christ's divinity by Constantine. He ignores the Arian controversy out of which it arose, which is like trying to explain the Treaty of Versailles without mentioning World War I. He ignores the documented fact, agreed upon even by the cheerleaders of the gnostics that he is sympathetic to, that the earliest gnostic doctrines held that Christ was *purely* God, and not really man -- the very reverse of the doctrine that serves as the linchpin of his novel's intellectual base (such as it is). This is a bad novel for weak or misinformed Christians, but anyone familiar with history should spot the train wreck of Brown's ideas a mile off.

    Oh yes, and in Brown's world, Opus Dei has shadowy assassin "monks" (in real life, Opus Dei is not a monastic order -- there are no Opus Dei monks, let alone trained assassins), and the Catholic Church has been promulgating known lies as its central dogmas, promotes violence throughout the world, and has been retarding the progress of science and knowledge for 2 millennia. Brown leaves the reader with the impression that this, too, is a matter of settled historical record. Oh, but then again, it's just fiction. Except when it's not.

    In general, if you're looking for a heady thriller wrapped around Christian arcana, I'd recommend Umberto Eco's excellent

    , not this dumbed down, by-the-numbers novel.

  • Ethan

    Four stars for

    .

    However, Dave Barry's review gets five stars:

    `The Da Vinci Code,' cracked

    by Dave Barry

    I have written a blockbuster novel. My inspiration was The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown, which has sold 253 trillion copies in hardcover because it's such a compelling page-turner. NOBODY can put this book down:

    MOTHER ON BEACH: Help! My child is being attacked by a shark!

    LIFEGUARD (looking up from The DaVinci Code: Not now! I just got to page 243, where it turns out that one

    Four stars for

    .

    However, Dave Barry's review gets five stars:

    `The Da Vinci Code,' cracked

    by Dave Barry

    I have written a blockbuster novel. My inspiration was The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown, which has sold 253 trillion copies in hardcover because it's such a compelling page-turner. NOBODY can put this book down:

    MOTHER ON BEACH: Help! My child is being attacked by a shark!

    LIFEGUARD (looking up from The DaVinci Code: Not now! I just got to page 243, where it turns out that one of the men depicted in ''The Last Supper'' is actually a woman!

    MOTHER: I know! Isn't that incredible? And it turns out that she's . . .

    SHARK (spitting out the child): Don't give it away! I'm only on page 187!

    The key to The DaVinci Code is that it's filled with startling plot twists, and almost every chapter ends with a ''cliffhanger,'' so you have to keep reading to see what will happen. Using this formula, I wrote the following blockbuster novel, titled The Constitution Conundrum. It's fairly short now, but when I get a huge publishing contract, I'll flesh it out to 100,000 words by adding sentences.

    CHAPTER ONE: Handsome yet unmarried historian Hugh Heckman stood in the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C., squinting through the bulletproof glass at the U.S. Constitution. Suddenly, he made an amazing discovery.

    ''My God!'' he said, out loud. ``This is incredible! Soon I will say what it is.''

    CHAPTER TWO: ''What is it?'' said a woman Heckman had never seen before who happened to be standing next to him. She was extremely beautiful, but wore glasses as a sign of intelligence.

    ''My name is Desiree Legume,'' she said.

    Heckman felt he could trust her.

    ''Look at this!'' he said, pointing to the Constitution.

    ''My God, that's incredible!'' said Desiree. ``It's going to be very surprising when we finally reveal what we're talking about!''

    CHAPTER THREE: ''Yes,'' said Hugh, ``incredible as it seems, there are extra words written in the margin of the U.S. Constitution, and nobody ever noticed them until now! They appear to be in some kind of code.''

    ''Let me look,'' said Desiree. ``In addition to being gorgeous, I am a trained codebreaker. Oh my God!''

    ''What is it?'' asked Hugh in an excited yet concerned tone of voice. ''The message,'' said Desiree, ``is . . . ''

    But just then, the chapter ended.

    CHAPTER FOUR: ''It's a fiendishly clever code,'' explained Desiree. 'As you can see, the words say: `White House White House Bo Bite House, Banana Fana Fo Fite House, Fe Fi Mo Mite House, White House.' ''

    ''Yes,'' said Hugh, frowning in bafflement. ``But what can it possibly mean?''

    ''If I am correct,'' said Desiree, ``it is referring to . . . the White House!''

    ''My God!'' said Hugh. ``That's where the president lives! Do you think . . . ''

    ''Do I think what?'' said Desiree.

    ''I don't know,'' said Hugh. ``But we're about to find out.''

    CHAPTER FIVE: Hugh and Desiree crouched in some bushes next to the Oval Office.

    ''We'd better hurry up and solve this mystery,'' remarked Desiree anxiously. ''It's only a matter of time before somebody notices that the Constitution is missing.'' She had slipped it into her purse at the National Archives while the guard wasn't looking.

    ''The answer must be here somewhere,'' said Hugh, studying the ancient document, which was brown from age and the fact that he had spilled Diet Peach Snapple on it.

    ''Wait a minute!'' he said. ``I've got it!''

    ''What?'' said Desiree, her breasts heaving into view.

    ''The answer!'' said Hugh. ``It's . . .

    But just then, shots rang out.

    CHAPTER SIX: ''That was close!'' remarked Desiree. ``Fortunately, those shots had nothing to do with the plot of this book.''

    ''Yes,'' said Hugh. ``Anyway, as I was saying, the answer is to hold the Constitution up so that it is aligned with the White House and the Washington Monument. . . . There, do you see what I mean?''

    ''My God!'' said Desiree, seeing what he meant. ``It's . . . ''

    ''Hold it right there,'' said the president of the United States.

    CHAPTER SEVEN: '' . . . and so you see,'' concluded the president, ``you two uncovered a shocking and fascinating secret that, if it should ever get out, could change the course of history.''

    ''Mr. President,'' said Desiree, ``thank you for that riveting and satisfying explanation, which will be fleshed out into much greater detail once there is a publishing contract.''

    ''Also,'' noted Hugh, ``we may use some beverage other than Snapple, depending on what kind of product-placement deals can be worked out.''

    ''Good,'' said the president. ``Now can I have the Constitution back?''

    They all enjoyed a hearty laugh, for they knew that the movie rights were also available...

  • Stephen

    …someone let me in on the gag because between the cries of

    and the screams of

    , my itty bitty brain is left very…

    So

    , I finally got around to reading this popular, polarizing, pop culture icon and thought it was….drum roll……………………FINE(sigh). It was a solid read with a slight lean towards the “eh” side of MEH and few moments of genuine “that’s neat.” I don’t see all the love and I don’t see

    …someone let me in on the gag because between the cries of

    and the screams of

    , my itty bitty brain is left very…

    So

    , I finally got around to reading this popular, polarizing, pop culture icon and thought it was….drum roll……………………FINE(sigh). It was a solid read with a slight lean towards the “eh” side of MEH and few moments of genuine “that’s neat.” I don’t see all the love and I don’t see all the rage. Other than the obvious religious flavor of the content, it reminded me of your typical page-turning, popcorn beach read and I thought it accomplished its goal in decent, if unremarkable, fashion.

    Now I have a strict

    approach when it comes to religiousness so I am going to ignore the

    aspects of the story, though I can certainly see people on both sides of the fence having “epic rah rah” or “epic fail” reactions and I respect that. For me, it didn’t move my needle much in either direction beyond my fondness for the “big hidden history mystery” which is something I generally really enjoy.

    The plot of this one has been talked to death and beyond so rather than adding one more jelly bean to the jar, I thought I would just run down a few likes and dislikes about the story and leave it at that.

    1.

    : are just fully fun and I am a major sucker for plots concerning “shadow” histories and secret people doing secret things behind secret doors for reasons that are SHHHHHHH. I love a good conspiracy. Find me a rumor involving

    being a

    and using a secret banking pipeline running from

    through

    to the

    and laundering vast monies to be used to coordinate the sale of

    to a

    headed by

    who will then turn the city into a giant

    used for the testing of alien “cloning” technology………….and I am glued to my seat and ONE HAPPY FELLA.

    2.

    : As much as I love conspiracies in general, when you throw the Knights Templar into the mix, it’s gonna perk me up better than a latte enema. I am always in favor of having them show up as a lynch pin to any massive global plot. The Knights Templar are like caramel on ice cream and just make a good conspiracy better. I had a lot of fun with the rehash of the Templar’s place in the center of EVERYTHING.

    3.

    : I thought the major plot components themselves were interesting and I enjoyed following the hidden clues, messages, riddles and the tie in to all of the famous historical artifacts. It was fun. I also liked the “historical significance” of the search (i.e., the “big reveal”) and the implications to the world if revealed.

    1.

    : As much as I enjoyed the plot concept, the execution of the story was often frustrating and occasionally insulting. I’m not talking about the clunky, “serviceable at best” prose as that’s gotten enough play without my squirting lighter fluid on the bonfire. My issue is more with Dan feeling the need to “spoon feed” me details about his “oh so clever plot” so that my economy-sized brain could grasp it.

    For example, there would be a “reveal” that I thought was interesting….and then Dan would exhaust me with explaining EXACTLY what that meant and EXACTLY what the implications were and make sure I knew EXACTLY what he had told me. I get it Mr. Brown, heard you the first time.

    2.

    : For a page turning, actiony thriller, there was just too much sideways movement of the plot and some really unnecessary amounts of plod to the narrative. Part of this has to do with the excessive “hand holding” Dan does with his audience mentioned above. However, there are also WAY too much time spent slowing down to take a look around and where we are and where we’ve been. I started getting the impression that Brown was trying to hit a particular page count for the book and didn’t have anything but filler to loan the pages with. This is never a good thing for this kind of story.

    3.

    : Not a big fan of the final resolution of the story and I found it very

    and a bit of a let down. Once we have the big reveal, very little new information ever really got added to the picture and I felt like my curiosity should have been stroked a few more times than it was in the home stretch. This lack of satisfying climax left me with a serious case of

    Still, overall, this was a good, serviceable mystery-thriller that seems tailor-made for a warm afternoon on the sand. It isn’t great literature, or even good literature, but it is a good thriller, a good concept and, for the most part, fun. It seems to accomplish pretty much exactly what it set out to do.

    2.5 to 3.0 stars.

  • Will Byrnes

    - image from

    A real page-turner, about a Holy Grail quest. It is replete with oodles of interesting little details about church history, the true meaning of the grail, secret societies through the ages, Opus Dei and architectural details. In this fast-paced adventure an American art expert is accused of killing a director of the Louvre. Rescued by the deceased's granddaughter, a police cryptologist, the pair flees from both French and British police. The tale is enlivened wit

    - image from

    A real page-turner, about a Holy Grail quest. It is replete with oodles of interesting little details about church history, the true meaning of the grail, secret societies through the ages, Opus Dei and architectural details. In this fast-paced adventure an American art expert is accused of killing a director of the Louvre. Rescued by the deceased's granddaughter, a police cryptologist, the pair flees from both French and British police. The tale is enlivened with characters such as Silas, an albino ex-con who has seen the light and been taken in by the head of a Catholic extremist cult, Leigh, a British knight obsessed with finding the grail. Great fun!

    I also reviewed Brown''s

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    and

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  • Mohammed Arabey

    أهم لوحات الرواية وسر حبكتها، شفرة دافنشي، العشاء الاخير

    أهم لوحات الرواية وسر حبكتها، شفرة دافنشي، العشاء الاخير

    افتكر ان من الأفضل انك تدخل بين صفحات الرواية أفضل لمعرفة تلك المعلومات والتاريخ والفن والعلم الغامض عند دافنشي وغيره من فناني عصره...اما عن رأيي بيها فشايف فعلا فيها بعض التكهنات أكيد وبعضها يصدم بالدين المسيحي مما اثار الجدل حول الرواية

    مع ان دان براون نفسه روايته قيل انها متشابهة في الموضوع الجدلي الكنسي كرواية امبرتو ايكو

    1980

    وبرغم من انها من الثمانيات الا انها لم تلق نصيبها من الشهرة الواسعة الا عندما تم اطلاق عليها دعائيا "اصل رواية شفرة دافنشي لدان براون

    وايضا استخدام عنصر لوحة العشاء الأخير وفرسان الهيكل التي أثارت جدلا من قبل خاصا بعد 1997 بصدور كتاب

    لكن يظل دان براون هو الأشهر والأقوي بروايته المثيرة تلك

    "وربما تنبأ دان براون بهذا الاعتلاء علي عرش اعلي مبيعات الكتب اثناء كتابته للرواية بذكره لكتابين من اعلي مبيعات الكتب في العالم من قبله في الحوار التالي:

    الذي دار بين روبرت لانجدون الذي يريد نشر كتابه حول نظريته عن الكأس المقدسه وبين صديقه ناشر كتبه الذي يساله لماذا لم يحاول احد الكتاب من قبله نشر الحقائق التي كتبها لانجدون حول ذلك الموضوع

    محمد العربي

    الاسكندريه من 10 مارس 2013

    الي 19 مارس 2013

  • Ahmad  Ebaid
  • Raghad

    ستعرفُ أنك قرأت كتاباً جيداً عندما تقلب الصفحة الأخيرة وتشعر كأنك فقدت صديقاً

    .

    حسنًا حسنًا

    اقسم أن هذه الرواية أصابتني بالجنون وجعلتني أشهق بأستمرار قائلة : يا الهي لايعقل

    إذا اردت أن تقرأ هذه الرواية يجب ان تبتعد عن كل ما هو بشري حولك لأني ارتكبت غلطة وقرأت جزءًا منها وانا بين عائلتي فما كانت النتيجة الا بتغيير اسمي من "رغد" الى المصروعة بسبب صراخي المستمر <كتعبير عن الدهشة

    :]

    ياصديقي كلمة رائعة هي كلمة جدًاا قليلة بحقها

    بعد هذه الرواية دان براون أصبح الكاتب رقم و

    ستعرفُ أنك قرأت كتاباً جيداً عندما تقلب الصفحة الأخيرة وتشعر كأنك فقدت صديقاً

    .

    حسنًا حسنًا

    اقسم أن هذه الرواية أصابتني بالجنون وجعلتني أشهق بأستمرار قائلة : يا الهي لايعقل

    إذا اردت أن تقرأ هذه الرواية يجب ان تبتعد عن كل ما هو بشري حولك لأني ارتكبت غلطة وقرأت جزءًا منها وانا بين عائلتي فما كانت النتيجة الا بتغيير اسمي من "رغد" الى المصروعة بسبب صراخي المستمر <كتعبير عن الدهشة

    :]

    ياصديقي كلمة رائعة هي كلمة جدًاا قليلة بحقها

    بعد هذه الرواية دان براون أصبح الكاتب رقم واحد بالنسبة إلي (من بعد السيدة أجاثا كريستي طبعًا )

    شيفرة دافنتشي تحفة رائعة تُخلد في ذاكرة كل من قرأها

    رواية ممتلئة بالرموز والإشارات والأسرار. وهذا كله أعطاها سمة الخلود.

    انها رواية مليئة بكشف أسرار كثيرة بدأً من لوحة الرجل الميتروفي والموناليزا والعشاء الأخير الى لغز الكأس المقدسة !!

    هل ضاعت الحقيقة فعلًا ؟

    رواية تنزع نحو المغايرة، بسبب الإثارة والسرية التي تحتويها، وحرب الرموز الخطرة الدائرة فيها بين الوثنية والمسيحية. ورغم أنها ليست رواية تبشيرية تحاول إقناع قارئ بحقيقة تاريخية معينة، فإنها في سعيها الممتع والمثير لطرح حقائق متعددة (لا حقيقة واحدة) قدمت رؤى انقلابية لتاريخ المسيحية وتاريخ المسيح؛ وهو ما دفع الناقد البريطاني مارك لوسون بوصفها "بالهراء الخلاب"، وهو ما دفع أيضا ثلاثة مؤلفين غربيين للرد عليها من خلال ثلاثة كتب: "الحقيقة وراء شفرة دافنشي"، "وحل شفرة دافنشي"، و"الحقيقة والخيال في شفرة دافنشي".

    أول لغز كان مقتل جاك سونيير، القيّم في متحف اللوفر بباريس. مقتله جعل المحققين يستعينون بِبطل الرواية، روبرت لانغدون

    أستاذ علم الرموز الدينية في جامعة هارفرد. وتبدأ عندئذ رحلة ممتعة ومشوقة نحو مجاهل قصص الجريمة.

    (على فكرة لانغدون وصوفي من الشخصيات التي ستحبها بحق ,, بالنسبة لي هما شخصيتان مضافتان للشخصيات المخلدة في ذاكرتي )

    شعر لانغدون بقشعريرة تسري في جسده عندما رأى جثة سونيير، وكانت أغرب منظر رآه في حياته. لقد استخدم سونيير دمه كحبر ومستعملاً بطنه العاري كلوحة. لقد رسم عليها رمزاً بسيطاً: خمسة خطوط مستقيمة تتقاطع فيما بينها شكلت رمز النجمة الخماسية. إنها رسالة يريد أن يقول فيها شيئاً يفسر ما حدث له.

    ولم تكن النجمة فقط، بل نص مكتوب بالقلم اللامرئي، وهناك شيء آخر هو الذي فسر المعنى في النهاية، فقد خط حول نفسه دائرة، فنطق لانغدون بلهفة: "الرجل الفيتروفي".

    كان تعبيير لانغدون كالتالي حينما رأي منظر سونيير

    وكان تعبيري اقوى عندما كنت اقرأ وصف المنظر الذي كان به سونيير

    بوضوح يعلن الكاتب تزييف رجال الفاتيكان لتاريخ المسيح ومحو كل الشواهد حول بشريته.. كما يؤكد إهدار الكنيسة لدور المرأة حين حولت العالم من الوثنية المؤنثة إلى المسيحية الذكورية بإطلاق حملة تشهير حولت الأنثى المقدسة إلى شيطان ومحت تماما أي أثر للآلهة الأنثى في الدين الحديث.

    "الأنثى المقدسة" هي عقيدة جوهرية لدى جماعة سيون السرية.. ولتأكيد هذه الفكرة يقدم دان براون قراءة جمالية ممتعة ومبدعة في لوحة "الموناليزا" والتي تعكس بوضوح إيمان ليوناردو دافنشي بالتوازن بين الذكر والأنثى. فالموناليزا كما يؤكد الخبراء لا هي ذكر ولا هي أنثى ولكنها التحام بين الاثنين، بل إن تحليل اللون بواسطة الكمبيوتر وتحليل صورة دافنشي نفسه يؤكد نقاطا متشابهة بين وجهيهما.

    وبرغم أنه رسم كمًّا هائلا من الفن المسيحي وبرغم طبيعته الروحانية فقد ظل على خلاف مستمر مع الكنيسة، يرسم الموضوعات المسيحية، لكنه يضمّن اللوحات الكثير من الأسرار والرموز التي تحتشد بمعتقداته الخاصة كأحد الأعضاء البارزين في جماعة "سيون" التي هي أبعد ما تكون عن المسيحية.

    وفوق جدارية كنيسة سانتا ماريا في ميلانو بإيطاليا رسم دافنشي لوحته الأسطورية "العشاء الأخير" التي ضمنها الكثير من الأسرار والرموز حول عقائده. ويقدم دان براون قراءته الصادمة محاولا فك الشفرات وتحليل الخطوط داخل اللوحة.

    حسنًا يا صديقي هل ترى لوحة العشاء الأخير؟

    إنها تقدم لنا رمز مهم يعبر عن الكأس المقدسة كالآتي:

    والرمز التالي عكسه :

    إذا اندمجا كونا لنا شعار جدًا معروف

    هل استوعبت ماعرضته قبل قليل؟

    هل أستطعت ان تربط بين الرمزين أم بعد؟

    حسنًا يا عزيزي ان كنت تريد ان تعرف أكثر يجب عليك أن تقرأ شيفرة دافنتشي

    لم ارهق عقلي ولم استقبل صدمات كادت ان تؤدي بحياتي لأكشف عن الأسرار بهذه السهولة

    فجاك سونيير ليس أفضل مني في الغموض :P

    هل رُويت قصة الكأس المقدسة من قبل؟

    حتى هذا الكتاب !!

    وراء أي عمل فني أو أدبي هناك رسالة ما يريد أن يوصلها الفنان أو الأديب للقارئ. إنه يتخفى وراء عمله ويترك شيفرة ما، يمررها من خلال لوحته أو روايته أو فلمه. رسالة تريد أن توضح حقيقة ما، كي لا تبقى لغزاً إلى الأبد.


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