Animal Farm by George Orwell

Animal Farm

As ferociously fresh as it was more than a half century ago, this remarkable allegory of a downtrodden society of overworked, mistreated animals, and their quest to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality is one of the most scathing satires ever published. As we witness the rise and bloody fall of the revolutionary animals, we begin to recognize the seeds of t...

Title:Animal Farm
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Edition Language:English

Animal Farm Reviews

  • Tessa De Guzman

    Funnily enough, i read this book as a child and thought that it really WAS about animals. I remember thinking, Evil Pigs, I'm glad you're bacon in MY world, and Poor Hardworking Horsies, come live on my farm instead. You can have all the hay and makopa you want (sadly, no apples, tropical climate).

    I reread it after education spoiled my natural inclinations for fast and absolute punishment of evildoers and eternal rewards for the good. I do find it pleasantly strange that these animals are symbol

    Funnily enough, i read this book as a child and thought that it really WAS about animals. I remember thinking, Evil Pigs, I'm glad you're bacon in MY world, and Poor Hardworking Horsies, come live on my farm instead. You can have all the hay and makopa you want (sadly, no apples, tropical climate).

    I reread it after education spoiled my natural inclinations for fast and absolute punishment of evildoers and eternal rewards for the good. I do find it pleasantly strange that these animals are symbols for political stereotypes and yet people still appear in the book. Isn't that CRAZY? That's literary perversion in a class all its own.

    I'm thankful i read this in my formative years, before I had all this intellectual baggage (emphasis on baggage, piano on the intellect), because I got to appreciate it like a child would, almost like the way I appreciated Charlotte's Web. To me, back then, it was just another story about animals, albeit a wordy one, with no pictures.

    Which is probably why I still experience a certain righteous thrill when eating crispy bacon.

  • Petra Eggs

    This is not really a review, but one of those moments where everything that was clear to you suddenly becomes utterly muddied and you really can't say what lies beneath the murky waters although a moment before you were sure you could.

    I'm reading Christopher Hitchen's astonishingly percipient and brilliant

    . I read Animal Farm too young to identify the individual animals with actual character

    This is not really a review, but one of those moments where everything that was clear to you suddenly becomes utterly muddied and you really can't say what lies beneath the murky waters although a moment before you were sure you could.

    I'm reading Christopher Hitchen's astonishingly percipient and brilliant

    . I read Animal Farm too young to identify the individual animals with actual characters on the stage of communism (the old boar Major is Marx, Farmer Jones is the Tsar, the pigs Napoleon and Snowball, Stalin and Trotsky respectively) so this essay is giving me a lot to think about. So far, nothing more so than this quote (below).

    (Background to the quote): A group of Ukrainian and Polish refugees in a displaced persons' camp had discovered sympathetic parallels with their own plight in Orwell's parable and had begged him for permission to translate his almost-totally unknown book. But...

    The book is banned in Cuba, North Korea, Burma, Iran, Kenya and most Arab countries. It is banned in the UAE not because of it's content but because it has anthropomorphic talking pigs which are unIslamic (is this not Orwellian in itself?). It is still censored in Vietnam. These nations wouldn't want ordinary people reading the book and looking at their own ruling

    elites and seeing any parallels now would they? Who knows what kind of thoughts and actions that might lead to?

    On 17 July 2009, Amazon.com withdrew certain Amazon Kindle titles, including Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, from sale, refunded buyers, and remotely deleted items from purchasers' devices after discovering that the publisher lacked rights to publish the titles in question. Notes and annotations for the books made by users on their devices were also deleted. After the move prompted outcry and comparisons to Nineteen Eighty-Four itself, Amazon spokesman Drew Herdener stated that the company is "changing our systems so that in the future we will not remove books from customers' devices in these circumstances." However, at the end of 2014 Amazon does not seem to a guarantee in its ToS that they won't don't this again.

    Next step:

    . Get the firemen out to burn the books, only ebooks allowed where content can be controlled.

    Original review 30 Oct 2011, updated 7 Dec 2014

  • Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    This is a book I've been meaning to read for ages but never got around to - last week I not only read it but gave a lesson on the historical context for the grade 8 class, who will be reading this book and

    . As I found, out of the class of 24, about 20 of them had already read the book, and at least one kid knew it was an allegory of the Russian Revolution. Still, my lesson wasn't totally redundant :)

    For anyone who isn't familiar with the story,

    is about the animals on a farm

    This is a book I've been meaning to read for ages but never got around to - last week I not only read it but gave a lesson on the historical context for the grade 8 class, who will be reading this book and

    . As I found, out of the class of 24, about 20 of them had already read the book, and at least one kid knew it was an allegory of the Russian Revolution. Still, my lesson wasn't totally redundant :)

    For anyone who isn't familiar with the story,

    is about the animals on a farm in England rising up against the incompetent, cruel farmer (Mr Jones, who represents the deposed Tsar, Nicholas II) and taking over the farm, renaming it Animal Farm (USSR) and - so the glorious vision intended - running it for themselves, so their lives would be better.

    The vision is given to them by a pig, Old Major, who dies not long afterwards. Old Major probably represents Vladimir Lenin and Karl Marx, and it's not the socialist ideal put forward that is critiqued by this book but how that vision is corrupted by certain other characters, namely another pig called Napoleon, who represents Joseph Stalin. Napoleon chases a pig called Snowball (Leon Trotsky) off the farm with his personally trained dogs (while still just the General Secretary of the Party, Stalin recruited people who would follow him blindly, so that when Lenin died in 1924 he was able to defeat Trotsky for the leadership position and his "dogs" kept everyone else in line).

    The pigs then take charge, and with their literacy skills keep changing the rules the animals established in order to suit themselves, using a pig called Squealer to convince the other animals that their memories are faulty. After all, as the drafthorse Boxer keeps saying, "Comrade Napoleon is always right".

    Boxer is - for me - the most heartbreaking character in the novel. He represents the peasants, and is the most hardworking animal on the farm. He has utter faith in the leadership of Napoleon and works himself to the bone - literally. His reward is very telling, though I don't want to give it away. Most of the characters represent either a person, several people or groups of people, and for the complete list you can check it out on Wikipedia.

    Orwell, while a socialist, was very cynical about Stalin's communist USSR - and for good reason!

    is a very well-written critique of how socialist ideals are corrupted by powerful people, how the uneducated masses are taken advantage of, and how the dictator or communist leaders turn into capitalists (just look at China). It's a wonderful example of how effective the allegorical style/format can be, and a well-deserved classic.

  • Manny

    A perfect book. People will still be reading this in a thousand years time, when communism is just a footnote.

  • بثينة العيسى

    جورج أورويل عبقري بشكل مزعج. يكتب رواية أبطالها حيوانات في مزرعة ويخيل إليك بأن الأمر سيكون سخيفاً، أو شبيها بقصص الأطفال. على العكس، جورج أورويل نقل الواقع بكابوسيته، وجعل التاريخ أكثر قابلية للفهم، وشرح لنا باختصار كيف يمكن أن يتحول الإنسان إلى خنزير والخنزير إلى إنسان.

    رواية جديرة بوقتك بالتأكيد.

  • Mohammed Arabey

    الدستور

    الخرفان

    ديني

    محمد العربي

    فقط في 24 يونيو 2013

    "ملحوظه"

    -----

    قرأت تلك الرواية قبل احداث 30 يونيو 2013

    والغريب جدا ان بعد أعادة قراءتي للريفيو أجد أنها تصلح لنفس الحال بعد سنتين..نفس الريفيو الرمزي يصلح لأي وقت...بالضبط كالرواية..وسعدت أني كتبت الريفيو بالرمز مثلها

    العجيب فعلا ان الرواية تصلح لكل العهود السياسية التي أتت علينا

    مصر قبل 25 يناير وبعدها

    مصر قبل 30 يونيو وبعدها

    وبمجرد ان قرئتها..شعرت ان هذه الرواية يجب ان يتم تدريسها بالمدارس..فكل الاجيال تستحق هذا الوعي السياسي

    الا اني رايت سببا -وان اكاد ان اجزم انه ليس السبب الرئيسي لهذا- ان نهايتها المقبضه لا تتناسب لصغار السن

    ولكن هذه النهاية المقبضة للاسف...واقعية

  • Ahmad  Ebaid
  • Clau R.

    Those damn PIGS.

    I can't even.

  • Ariel

    I first read this in Grade 11 and decided it was my favourite book. I knew a reread needed to happen right away, but it took me four years to finally get around to it when my boyfriend gifted me this beautiful illustrated edition. Animal Farm is a book I often think about and often quote, and it was a bit nerve-wracking to go back to it to see if it actually lived up to everything I had built it up to be. Thankfully, I'm thrilled to say it did.

    In many ways it's a little bit underwhelming the sec

    I first read this in Grade 11 and decided it was my favourite book. I knew a reread needed to happen right away, but it took me four years to finally get around to it when my boyfriend gifted me this beautiful illustrated edition. Animal Farm is a book I often think about and often quote, and it was a bit nerve-wracking to go back to it to see if it actually lived up to everything I had built it up to be. Thankfully, I'm thrilled to say it did.

    In many ways it's a little bit underwhelming the second time around, because the plot (which lots of people will already know because it's a retelling of the Russian revolution) is extremely simplistic. This meant, however, that I was able to focus more on motivations and symbols and the other meaty stuff outside of the plot (which, don't get me wrong, was still hella exciting).

    The big question: is this still my favourite book? Yes. I've not yet read a book that so succinctly and simply drives home an idea with wonderful intricacies and nuances. After all this time I also feel so comfortable with this book, I get it and love talking about it and see reflections of it all the time. Also, in response to this edition, I loved the illustrations. They were sinister and childlike and felt like political caricatures - I think Orwell would like them. Apparently Andy Serkis is going to be making a film adaptation of Animal Farm and I'm super jazzed. That doesn't really have anything to do with this review, but I wanted to share my joy.

    Finally, thank you to Greg for gifting me this pretty book, reading it aloud with me over FaceTime, and letting me go on big rants about why Benjamin is the WORST. <3

    June 23rd, 2012:

    One of my favourite classics. Absolutely brilliant. Just great. Read it in Grade 11 and never looked back! Really introduced me into loving classics.

  • Anne

    Yeah, yeah, everyone

    Orwell wrote this as about the Russian Revolution, Stalin, and the rise of Communism.

    Pshttt. Whatever.

    You know what I think he was really saying?

    Ok, maybe not.

    Look, I know what you're thinking,

    , but the next thing you know, that piggy is all grown up and stealing your cookies!

    And you'll let it steal your cookies because Mr. Pig has convinced you that giving up your

    every

    Yeah, yeah, everyone

    Orwell wrote this as about the Russian Revolution, Stalin, and the rise of Communism.

    Pshttt. Whatever.

    You know what I think he was really saying?

    Ok, maybe not.

    Look, I know what you're thinking,

    , but the next thing you know, that piggy is all grown up and stealing your cookies!

    And you'll let it steal your cookies because Mr. Pig has convinced you that giving up your

    every day was a part of the original agreement! Besides, what do you know, you're just a stupid sheep...

    Plus, it's just a cookie, where's the harm?

    Not to mention, the last guy who complained about giving up his cookie ended up mauled by that dog. Probably just a coincidence, though.

    But it's ok because pigs are smart. That's what everyone says, right? Smarter than

    are, at any rate. And if the pig says it's ok, then it's ok.

    I mean look at it! It couldn't possibly have anything but your best interests at heart!

    Alright, I'm outta pig gifs.

    So, I thought this was a pretty cool book. Sure, it's supposed to be about Russia, but it could just as easily be about the working class in

    country.

    Bottom line?

    We need to stop listening to the spin doctors on the boob tube and start thinking for ourselves. Question everything, especially the things we think we

    are true. It

    be a good idea to teach our kids that it's ok not blindly believe everything

    tell them, too. Besides, if we're right, then our ideals can stand up to the scrutiny of children. Otherwise, we risk raising a generation of idiots.


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