Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

Interview with the Vampire

This is the story of Louis, as told in his own words, of his journey through mortal and immortal life. Louis recounts how he became a vampire at the hands of the radiant and sinister Lestat and how he became indoctrinated, unwillingly, into the vampire way of life. His story ebbs and flows through the streets of New Orleans, defining crucial moments such as his discovery o...

Title:Interview with the Vampire
Author:
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Edition Language:English

Interview with the Vampire Reviews

  • Mark

    One of the rare few books I couldn't finish. I could not empathize with the lead character at all - once he turned into a vampire I would be regularly bombarded with paragraphs describing how goddamn beautiful everything was now that he could see them with his vampire eyes. The forest was beautiful, the night sky was beautiful, the homeless people were beautiful...not normally, mind you, only when seen through vampire eyes.

    These special vampire eyes might be the reason why Louis (narrator) and L

    One of the rare few books I couldn't finish. I could not empathize with the lead character at all - once he turned into a vampire I would be regularly bombarded with paragraphs describing how goddamn beautiful everything was now that he could see them with his vampire eyes. The forest was beautiful, the night sky was beautiful, the homeless people were beautiful...not normally, mind you, only when seen through vampire eyes.

    These special vampire eyes might be the reason why Louis (narrator) and Lestat (sort of bad guy) spend most of their time making moon eyes at one another.

    In fact, that's mostly all I can remember from the story since the plot was so forgettable. Aside from the characters adopting a girl (which was entertaining), Louis spends most of his time admiring things or arguing with Lestat.

    Skip the book, watch the movie.

  • Ren

    I first read this book in High School and my sad gothic self immediately fell in love with its beautiful, damaged characters. For years this book haunted me. The rest of the Vampires books were pulpy fun but this book really had something. She captured something here and her almost baroque prose really carries the story.

    Later in life, I came to realize that Interview is a kind of

    for goths. Louis is turned into a vampire and continues his search for the answers: who he is, wh

    I first read this book in High School and my sad gothic self immediately fell in love with its beautiful, damaged characters. For years this book haunted me. The rest of the Vampires books were pulpy fun but this book really had something. She captured something here and her almost baroque prose really carries the story.

    Later in life, I came to realize that Interview is a kind of

    for goths. Louis is turned into a vampire and continues his search for the answers: who he is, why he is, what his place is. He wars with lovers, family and friends in his search to define his own life only to discover that nothing he does matters and that everyone is just as lost as he is, an ultimately there are no answers but the ones we make ourselves.

  • C.

    You begin.

    It seems like it might be fun.

    A little bit trashy, but fun.

    Not so well written.

    Disappointing.

    Already, you know it won't be up to much.

    You keep reading.

    Why this way?

    You read, wondering why.

    It seems pointless.

    You are bored, your mind wanders.

    You keep reading.

    You cannot stop.

    It is dark.

    So dark.

    The atmosphere.

    Dark. Macabre. Gothic. Haunting.

    Erotic.

    You are trapped.

    Trapped in someone's twisted fantasy.

    Kinky.

    Until pain and suffering and anguish and loneliness are beautiful.

    Alluring.

    Seduct

    You begin.

    It seems like it might be fun.

    A little bit trashy, but fun.

    Not so well written.

    Disappointing.

    Already, you know it won't be up to much.

    You keep reading.

    Why this way?

    You read, wondering why.

    It seems pointless.

    You are bored, your mind wanders.

    You keep reading.

    You cannot stop.

    It is dark.

    So dark.

    The atmosphere.

    Dark. Macabre. Gothic. Haunting.

    Erotic.

    You are trapped.

    Trapped in someone's twisted fantasy.

    Kinky.

    Until pain and suffering and anguish and loneliness are beautiful.

    Alluring.

    Seductive.

    But you know that they are not, and no book will make it so.

    You keep reading.

    You are bored. You put the book down.

    But you have to finish it.

    You keep reading.

    You read.

    Waiting for gratification.

    Waiting for something to happen.

    Waiting.

    You cannot look away.

    You keep reading.

    It is a beautiful day outside.

    You keep reading.

    So dark.

    So sensual.

    So strange.

    The plot shifts.

    A small climax.

    You groan.

    Sigh.

    Still a hundred and fifty pages left.

    You keep reading.

    Repelled.

    Attracted.

    You shift positions.

    You ache for more.

    You keep reading.

    ...

    Blam! Kazam! Ka-POW!

    Climax!

    Death! Destruction! Fire!

    Alone.

    Downwards spiral.

    Depression.

    Dark.

    So dark.

    There is no suicide.

    Wandering.

    Searching.

    Existential angst.

    Oh.

    That was all.

    What a stupid ending.

  • Gaijinmama

    I am going to confess that I didn't read this book until 1993, after I'd seen the movie. I couldn't handle horror movies or scary books at the time, but Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas and a surprisingly good Tom Cruise really got my attention.

    Now I'm a bona fide fan. I'm working toward reading everything Rice has written, and now I enjoy many other authors who write about vampires.

    It wasn't just that the vampire dudes were soooo totally hot in the movie. As is usually the case, the book turned ou

    I am going to confess that I didn't read this book until 1993, after I'd seen the movie. I couldn't handle horror movies or scary books at the time, but Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas and a surprisingly good Tom Cruise really got my attention.

    Now I'm a bona fide fan. I'm working toward reading everything Rice has written, and now I enjoy many other authors who write about vampires.

    It wasn't just that the vampire dudes were soooo totally hot in the movie. As is usually the case, the book turned out to be even better. Rice's characters are among the most compelling ever created in fiction. Louis with his constant moral conflicts and philosophical musings, Lestat with his naughty Bad Boy Bloodsucking Attitude and sarcasm (which Tom Cruise did really well in the film..though Lestat is definitely supposed to be taller!). Claudia with her keen intelligence and relentless anger at having been trapped for eternity in a child's body. Armand for being..at this stage of the series anyway...such a deep, dark, sexy enigma. Rice was the first author to make her vampires complex enough to keep my attention and, more importantly, make me actually **LIKE** them as they go around ripping people's throats out.

    My favorite character however, has got to be the City of New Orleans, the true star of this show. I'm sure I'm nowhere near the first reader who has been inspired by Rice's books to visit this special, unique city and wander through the French Quarter and the Garden District. Rice knows and loves her city, and that feeling is infectious. I'm a sucker for well-developed characters, but in this book and the rest of Rice's work, it's the setting that draws me in most of all.

    The indelible image of Antonio almost kissing Brad doesn't hurt either

  • Shovelmonkey1

    Poor vampires. Such a bad press over the years what with all the blood sucking, neck snapping and general ravaging of virgins, maidens and anyone with a taste for Gothic-style bedroom furniture and an open window.

    Still, now that Edward Cullen and his pan-faced fan base of moody teens have infiltrated popular culture, replacing the stereotypical images of pale, foppish young men in lacy cuffs and brocaded velvet jackets with a utilitarian Gap-Style wardrobe of urban wear (and a slightly sulky lo

    Poor vampires. Such a bad press over the years what with all the blood sucking, neck snapping and general ravaging of virgins, maidens and anyone with a taste for Gothic-style bedroom furniture and an open window.

    Still, now that Edward Cullen and his pan-faced fan base of moody teens have infiltrated popular culture, replacing the stereotypical images of pale, foppish young men in lacy cuffs and brocaded velvet jackets with a utilitarian Gap-Style wardrobe of urban wear (and a slightly sulky look), we seem to be moving further away from the more traditional imagery. That said, R-Patz (see I know the lingo, I listen to the kids) appears to be dead from the eyeballs down in many scenes and is probably as wooden as the stake which should be used to pin him back into his eternal resting place, so not all elements of the vampire legend have been entirely done away with.

    Interview with the Vampire was almost solely responsible (see Lost Boys for its partner in crime) for spawning the epidemic known as the great vampire obsession of the late 20th century or at the very least a huge resurgence in the interest in vampire myth and lore. Ok, ok Bram Stoker deserves a big old nod for originally bringing us the whole idea of wing-ed blood suckers who like nothing more than a snooze in a wooden box and a brisk sea journey to the north-east coast of England. Or if you like we can go a bit further back and point the sharp end of the stake at Sheridan Le Fanu for his sapphic vampires which featured in his collection of short stories "In a Glass Darkly". Whoever you'd like to blame for it, you have to admit they were onto a good wheeze. The romance of immortality fuelled by the go-juice of another human being (it goes down easier if you just think of it as a sort of clotted Slim-Fast meal) seems to have had a weirdly kinky appeal which has garnered it a fan base of millions. Lets break it down and see what there really is to like about being a vampire.

    Eternal life - obviously gets a big tick but then it does depend who you get stuck with. If you end like Louis, locked in a bitter battle of wills with the sadistic Lestat, then eternity is going to seem like, well.... an eternity.

    Drinking blood - readily available, free (therefore credit crunch chic), nutritious and virtually calorie free. It's simple: Live fast, die young, drink blood and have a good looking and upwardly mobile corpse. (WARNING: don't try this at home- this review is not suggesting that a diet of blood will ever do you any favours, nor is it condoning "borrowing" the blood of people who are not you). Alternatively, forever is a long time to go without a solid meal and you know you'll eventually start complaining that dinner always tastes the same.

    Flight/ surprisingly speedy turns of movement - being super fast is a handy skill to have if you need to face the pacey modern lifestyle of the 21st century. Queue jumping, being first in the door at the Harvey Nichols January Sales and avoiding having to sit in economy class during flights are all things which would improve my life.

    Sleeping in a coffin - compact and bijoux if you live in a tiny inner city apartment where you're kitchen, bathroom, living room and bedroom are all practically the same room. Why not drape your coffin with an attractive throw and turn it into a table for night-time use? On the downside no one ever said eternal rest would be a comfortable one.

    Interview with the Vampire takes itself pretty seriously (a lot more seriously than this review), and despite the fact Louis' hand wringing and tortured immortal soul act did start to grate on me towards the end, overall I enjoyed this and was able to stop raising my eye brows long enough to appreciate the detail and originality of the story. Fangs for the great story Anne!

  • Kat Kennedy

    If you would kindly look at my shelves, you might notice that I've read a good chunk of vampire novels written in the past two decades. It seemed strange to me, though, that I still hadn't read one of the more important ones.

    Now, I don't think it's because this book is particularly brilliant or a masterpiece. Yet it does represent an important paradigm shift in the representation of vampires in modern literature. Whilst Vampires are still unaccountably evil in this novel, they are also relatabl

    If you would kindly look at my shelves, you might notice that I've read a good chunk of vampire novels written in the past two decades. It seemed strange to me, though, that I still hadn't read one of the more important ones.

    Now, I don't think it's because this book is particularly brilliant or a masterpiece. Yet it does represent an important paradigm shift in the representation of vampires in modern literature. Whilst Vampires are still unaccountably evil in this novel, they are also relatable, capable of sparking our empathy and intimate to us on a level not really seen previously to this novel.

    Published in 1976, it is the story of the world's most boring vampire, Louis. Okay, I take that back, ALMOST the world's most boring vampire...

    We've come a long way from the original publication of Interview With a Vampire. Previous to this novel, a story about Vampires was generally a horror novel and nobody expected Vampires to turn out to be the good guys. Now they are almost guaranteed to be, at the most, misunderstood.

    Like our current generation of teenagers...

    As far as I can see in my research, this seems to be the place where Vampire Empathizing began or at least was made popular. I wanted to know if The Lost Boys, Blade, Buffy The Vampire Slayer, Anita Blake, Vampire Diaries, Twilight et al owe their existence to Interview With A Vampire and if they've done it justice.

    Well, I've been searching for a Vampire novel or movie that is as much of a pop culture icon, that displays tenets of Vampire Empathizing and which predates Interview With a Vampire but so far my search hasn't revealed much.

    As for how this novels stands up to the wealth of vampire media that followed it? Well, in some aspects I think it is a vast improvement. The idea of Vampires being the dark seducer isn't new and using them to represent repressed sexuality has become stock standard.

    However this book deals with those two themes in a very different way. The dark seducer, Lestat, and the repressed sexual being, Claudia, both destroy Louis in vastly different ways and it's a nice, depressing change from the usual state of affairs.

    But still, on its own, it's not a fantastic book. It may have popularized Vampire Empathizing, but it's probably also responsible for a lot of terrible gothic poetry.

    And in case you're wondering if the movie is better than the book? In this instance, yes. Though I can't say why...

    I'm not sure what the movie has that the book doesn't...

    Or what makes the movie more intriguing...

    But it sure is SOMETHING!

  • Madeline

    Damn you straight to hell, 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, for what you made me do. You made me read a goddamn vampire book. Not only that, you made me read a vampire book with a cover made entirely of shiny ostentatious material that shouted to everyone in the library as I checked this out, "Look everyone! Madeline is reading a book about vampires! SHINY SHINY SHINY LOOK AT ME! I CONTAIN SEXY BROODING VAMPIRES AND I AM SO EFFING SHINY."

    (I cannot stress how shiny-gold this cover is. Li

    Damn you straight to hell, 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die, for what you made me do. You made me read a goddamn vampire book. Not only that, you made me read a vampire book with a cover made entirely of shiny ostentatious material that shouted to everyone in the library as I checked this out, "Look everyone! Madeline is reading a book about vampires! SHINY SHINY SHINY LOOK AT ME! I CONTAIN SEXY BROODING VAMPIRES AND I AM SO EFFING SHINY."

    (I cannot stress how shiny-gold this cover is. Like, the ancient Egyptians would look at this cover and say, "That's a bit much." It was awful.)

    Okay, so the book itself isn't

    , really - hence my rating of two stars, which Goodreads classifies as "it was ok." That's what the book is: just okay. Maybe I would have been more thrilled by the story if I hadn't seen the movie - even though there's stuff in the book that didn't make it into the movie, none of it is particularly thrilling. At least the movie made the wise decision to keep the blatant, in-your-face-but-unacknowledged homoeroticism (seriously, this book is, and I mean this in the most literal way possible, the gayest thing I've ever read) but changed the fact that a) Claudia is only five years old in the book and b) she and Louis do everything except actually have sex with each other. They're always kissing and caressing each other and Louis is calling her his lover and his paramour and it is

    .

    But, lest we forget, vampire books are

    to be creepy. In these post-

    days, it's easy to forget that there was once a time where vampires fucked and killed and were a general amoral all-around good time, and if one of them chose to be all broody and sad about being a vampire he was the weird one that no one else wanted to hang out with. God, I miss those days - to the point where I considered giving this an extra star, just because I was so grateful to read a story about vampires who do actual vampire stuff and it's sexy and scary instead of boring and schmoopy.

    Also good was how in-depth Rice goes into the psychology of vampires, and I loved her explanation for why they haven't overrun the planet: most vampires are miserable, and end up killing themselves. Explains Armand, who I will continue to picture as Antonio Banderas and you can't stop me:

    "How many vampires do you think have the stamina for immortality? They have the most dismal notions of immortality to begin with. For in becoming immortal they want all the forms of their life to be fixed as they are and incorruptible...When, in fact, all things change except the vampire himself; everything except the vampire is subject to constant corruption and distortion. Soon, with an inflexible mind, and often even with the most flexible mind, this immortality becomes a penitential sentence in a madhouse of figures and forms that are hopelessly unintelligible and without value. One evening a vampire rises and realizes what he has feared perhaps for decades, that he simply wants no more of life at any cost."

    That part was pretty cool. But as for the rest, I'll just watch the movie, thanks. Or not, because if we're going to be honest I don't even like the movie that much. It's probably time to admit to myself that I have no interest in reading about/watching any vampires not created by Joss Whedon. Sorry, Ms. Rice, but if my vampires must be broody, I at least want them to be funny and charming too. (or Alexander Skarsgard, because

    )

  • Antonio

    Hacía tiempo que no leía sobre vampiros, y quería darle una oportunidad a los famosos vampiros de Rice, conocidos por algunos (como yo) por la icónica película de “Entrevista con el vampiro” que lleva el mismo nombre del primer libro de la sag

    Hacía tiempo que no leía sobre vampiros, y quería darle una oportunidad a los famosos vampiros de Rice, conocidos por algunos (como yo) por la icónica película de “Entrevista con el vampiro” que lleva el mismo nombre del primer libro de la saga.

    A diferencia de otros libros de vampiros que he leído, acá, la historia está totalmente centrada en los inmortales, se nos presentan tres vampiros que van a formar una especie de familia moderna conviviendo gran parte de la historia, cada vampiro tiene una personalidad muy marcada, tenemos a Louis el protagonista, él es quien nos narrara su vida, su muerte y su inmortalidad.

    Louis representa la melancolía, la tristeza y autocondenación, él se odia a si mismo por ser vampiro, desprecia el tener que matar para sobrevivir, y tiene una búsqueda personal de lo sobrenatural y lo ético, ¿existe Dios? ¿Existe Satán? ¿Existe el bien? ¿Existe el mal? ¿Por qué soy inmortal? ¿Existe la salvación o todos estamos condenados? Son preguntas que lo atormentaran toda su existencia

    En contraparte tenemos a Lestat, opuesto totalmente en personalidad a Louis aparentemente, para él la muerte es un placer, la disfruta, es su pasión, no se cuestiona demasiado, su ética es más simple,

    Y luego tenemos a Claudia, la artimaña de Lestat, que se robó de todas las mujeres taimadas de la historia ¿qué hacer para conservar un hombre en tu vida? Respuesta: dale un hijo, en este caso una hija, una hija inmortal, eternamente niña, preciosa pero terrible, para ella la muerte no hay que razonarla o cuestionarla, es solo el simple acto de alimentarse, así como la Mona Lisa, sin risa ni llanto, debo decir que de los vampiros de la historia ella me parece la más temible.

    En general el libro me ha encantado, la pluma de Rice es envidiable para cualquier autor, debate temas profundos, como los ya mencionados el bien y el mal, lo sobrenatural, la existencia de Dios, (las conversaciones de Armand y Louis son las más importantes sobre esto), y el amor, si el amor, siendo acá bastante particular, el amor para los vampiros va más allá de lo físico, si bien es cierto que se habla mucho de la belleza, para ellos tiene que ver más con el apego y la convivencia, con la personalidad y con los sentimientos que otros vampiros (a veces humanos) despiertan en ellos, se ven amores de padres, amores fraternos, amores de parejas, amores de camaradería, amores de maestro y aprendiz, el amor es libre, sin importar género o edad, lo que me lleva a decir que si no tienes una mente abierta quizás este no sea un libro para ti.

    Desde luego pienso seguir leyendo sobre estos vampiros filosóficos, e invito a todos a leer a Rice, si les gustan las obras de horror que son más que solo monstruos , así como Frankenstein de Mary Shelley o El retrato de Dorian Gray de Oscar Wilde, de seguro les gustara la Entrevista con el vampiro de Anne Rice

  • Vessey

    I admit that I couldn't get through the rest of "The Vampire Chronicles", but this one stays a favourite.

    Why do you like it so, oh, vampire crazy Vessey? Really, I do like vampires. Even though I'm not a "Twilight" fan. I even have my own set of teeth. A real goth girl inhabits my body and she hungers for dark adventures. I'm a sinister person, I know. :)

    First, I really like Anne Rice's prose. It is so beautiful and enchanting. The whole story comes along with a good measure of dark sensuality,

    I admit that I couldn't get through the rest of "The Vampire Chronicles", but this one stays a favourite.

    Why do you like it so, oh, vampire crazy Vessey? Really, I do like vampires. Even though I'm not a "Twilight" fan. I even have my own set of teeth. A real goth girl inhabits my body and she hungers for dark adventures. I'm a sinister person, I know. :)

    First, I really like Anne Rice's prose. It is so beautiful and enchanting. The whole story comes along with a good measure of dark sensuality, which I particularly like. What is more important to me, though, is that it presents, in a very captivating way, problems which have been haunting humanity since for ever. How many people in reality live tortured by guilt and loneliness and feel different than everybody else the way Louis does? Or how many people are tormented by the thought that their looks do not show their true self and that the others are unable to see past the surface? (Claudia). Or how many people are forced to live and suffer with someone they can never quite connect to, out of necessity, loneliness, because they love them despite all, or all three at once? I think many people can relate to the heroes (I should say anti-heroes, really) of this dark tale.

    What is loneliness? What is the world? What is eternity? What does it mean to be immortal? What is the nature of existence? Is there God? What does it mean to be good? What does it mean to be evil? And which is the bigger evil - to be the actual committer of a crime or to allow it? What is life, what is death? It speaks not only of, and the value of, life and death of humans as individuals, but of the life and death of beliefs, values, possibilities.

    It is told through the POV of one narrator, but it has a really big scope. Anne Rice shows an amazing skill in reflecting people's feelings and struggles. What is fiction if not a mirror to reality? Two opposite concepts which are not that opposite, after all. Every creation of art is a message born out of its creator's experience and inner world.

    Read count: 4

  • Ana

    It's probably more a 3 1/2 star book, but I'm going to go for four stars because of the amazing characters.

    Twilight jokes aside, I really enjoyed reading this novel.

    Make room on your book bucket lists because Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire is a must read. One of my casual resolutions this year was to catch up on some of the books I've been meaning to read for a while, but just never got around to. I'm so glad I fi

    It's probably more a 3 1/2 star book, but I'm going to go for four stars because of the amazing characters.

    Twilight jokes aside, I really enjoyed reading this novel.

    Make room on your book bucket lists because Anne Rice's Interview with the Vampire is a must read. One of my casual resolutions this year was to catch up on some of the books I've been meaning to read for a while, but just never got around to. I'm so glad I finally picked up this book. I saw the movie first but still had goosebumps at the end.

    The bromance of Lestat and Louis.

    I know this is going to sound a little juvenile, but I ship them.

    Their relationship is so messed up and so complex. I truly believe that they loved each other the best they could under the circumstances.

    Claudia.

    She may be cute, but she is certainly a little psycho.

    Maybe my love for vampires isn't dead after all.

    P.S. I finished the book, Patty! I can finally log into goodreads with my head held high.


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