Regression, Vol. 1: Way Down Deep by Cullen Bunn

Regression, Vol. 1: Way Down Deep

Plagued by ghastly waking nightmares, Adrian reluctantly agrees to past life regression hypnotherapy. As his consciousness is cast back through time, Adrian witnesses a scene of horrific debauchery and diabolism. Waking, he is more unsettled than before, and with good reason--something has followed him back. Adrian descends into a world of occult conspiracy, mystery, reinc...

Title:Regression, Vol. 1: Way Down Deep
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Edition Language:English

Regression, Vol. 1: Way Down Deep Reviews

  • Mad Tom

    Adrian Padilla has gory, macabre, sometimes deeply erotic hallucinations. He undergoes

    hypnosis to figure them out. While the exact cause of his hallucinations is intentionally vague, the surrounding mystery and writing are pretty fantastic and the artwork is eerie and exquisite.

    My only complaint is Molly’s characterization: her blind complacency to help a friend who’s dangerously mentally ill and, in my opinion, enabling them, doing them a great disservice, and allowing them to harm

    Adrian Padilla has gory, macabre, sometimes deeply erotic hallucinations. He undergoes

    hypnosis to figure them out. While the exact cause of his hallucinations is intentionally vague, the surrounding mystery and writing are pretty fantastic and the artwork is eerie and exquisite.

    My only complaint is Molly’s characterization: her blind complacency to help a friend who’s dangerously mentally ill and, in my opinion, enabling them, doing them a great disservice, and allowing them to harm to themselves and others. I know this is “just a comic,” but having seen such behavior in real life, it’s demeaning for Molly’s character (and women) and a poor moral example to set for mental health, in order to serve the narrative.

  • Alex Sarll

    A man struggling with waking nightmares undergoes past life regression which, to put it mildly, doesn't help. Bunn's dad was a hypnotist, he explains in an afterword, but I'm not sure how much that adds; the wider details of the story weren't what grabbed me here so much as the sheer horridness of the visions, which mix invertebrates and body horror in all manner of inventively nasty ways, and are all the more effective for the understated realism of the art.

    (Edelweiss ARC)

  • FanFiAddict

    *First off, thanks to Image Comics for the ARC of Regression, Vol.1: Way Down Deep. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review.*

    Adrian Padilla has some pretty terrifying, oft times erotic, hallucinations and nightmares on a daily basis and is pushed to get help by his friend, Molly. After undergoing some life regression hypnotherapy, things become much worse and something from a lifetime before has come back with him. Though Adrian looks normal to the naked eye, this creature manifests

    *First off, thanks to Image Comics for the ARC of Regression, Vol.1: Way Down Deep. I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review.*

    Adrian Padilla has some pretty terrifying, oft times erotic, hallucinations and nightmares on a daily basis and is pushed to get help by his friend, Molly. After undergoing some life regression hypnotherapy, things become much worse and something from a lifetime before has come back with him. Though Adrian looks normal to the naked eye, this creature manifests itself in the blink of an eye and works its own agenda through Adrian’s body.

    I have read a decent bit of Bunn’s works (Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe, The Living Deadpool, Deadpool Killogy, and Harrow County, to name a few) and you can say that I am a pretty big fan of his work. The writing is pretty easy to follow and the story leaves just enough intrigue to keep you turning the pages. The artwork is well done as far as characters/environments go, but the horror that is Adrian’s hallucinations (all sorts of disgusting, insect covered/filled body images) is what really stood out.

    All in all, I am interested to see where the story goes from here and look forward to the next issues. Bunn always brings it with original material and I never know what he will do next.

  • Sam Quixote

    Haunted by waking nightmares and at his wits’ end, Asian Tom Hiddleston-lookalike Adrian goes to see a past life regression hypnotist in an effort to find peace of mind. Except the session only opens the door for something wicked to enter our world… !

    Though the premise reminded me of the underrated late ‘90s Kevin Bacon movie A Stir of Echoes, Cullen Bunn and Danny Luckert’s Regression is different enough to be its own thing – and it’s not bad. Though, as far as Bunn’s horror comics go, Regressi

    Haunted by waking nightmares and at his wits’ end, Asian Tom Hiddleston-lookalike Adrian goes to see a past life regression hypnotist in an effort to find peace of mind. Except the session only opens the door for something wicked to enter our world… !

    Though the premise reminded me of the underrated late ‘90s Kevin Bacon movie A Stir of Echoes, Cullen Bunn and Danny Luckert’s Regression is different enough to be its own thing – and it’s not bad. Though, as far as Bunn’s horror comics go, Regression ranks somewhere in the middle (so far anyway – this is a first volume): not as good as Death Follows but better than Harrow County.

    And I think it’s the fact that Regression is an ongoing, like Harrow County, that’s the biggest problem: Bunn is in no hurry to tell his tale. He’s got as much space as he needs and he’s going to use all of it! There’s a lot of intriguing elements here – the monster/s, the flashbacks to Elizabethan times, the ethereal insect realm, the creepy cult hanging in the background throughout – and Bunn holds the interest with the odd murder sprinkled here and there, but it still felt too slow with not enough development for my liking.

    Regression features a lot of quite shocking and unsettling body horror that artist Danny Luckert fully realises with some impressively gory visuals – this is a very graphic and visceral comic that’s definitely not for the kiddles! I especially enjoyed the supernatural imagery which was very striking. Marie Enger’s vivid and eye-catching colours were a fine match for the dramatic visuals.

    Ultimately though there were too many questions and too few answers which always makes for an unsatisfying read. I know it’s a first volume but there should still be some give and take to make it a more complete reading experience. I am interested to see what happens next though, especially with that cliffhanger, so I’ll be back for Volume 2. Hopefully with the table-setting out of the way that book will be more substantial.

    As it is, Regression, Volume 1: Way Down Deep is a fine, atmospheric and creepy horror that doesn’t so much as deliver an engrossing story as strongly hint that one’s on the way.

  • -RadioActiveBookWorm-

    Goodreads Synopsis:

    Plagued by ghastly waking nightmares, Adrian reluctantly agrees to past life regression hypnotherapy. As his consciousness is cast back through time, Adrian witnesses a scene of horrific debauchery and diabolism. Waking, he is more unsettled than before, and with good reason--something has followed him back. Adrian descends into a world of occult conspiracy, mystery, reincarnation, and insanity from which there is no escape.

    CULLEN BUNN (Harrow County, The Sixth Gun, The Empty

    Goodreads Synopsis:

    Plagued by ghastly waking nightmares, Adrian reluctantly agrees to past life regression hypnotherapy. As his consciousness is cast back through time, Adrian witnesses a scene of horrific debauchery and diabolism. Waking, he is more unsettled than before, and with good reason--something has followed him back. Adrian descends into a world of occult conspiracy, mystery, reincarnation, and insanity from which there is no escape.

    CULLEN BUNN (Harrow County, The Sixth Gun, The Empty Man), DANNY LUCKERT (Haunted), and MARIE ENGER (Pistolwhip, 2 Sisters), present a tale of supernatural terror and intrigue unlike any horror comic you've ever experienced.

    Collects issues 1 through 5.

    My Review:

    I received a copy of this from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

    I just want to say before we start, that I love the cover for this. The art just looks so nice and intriguing that I couldn't possible skip over this. The book, although only one hundred and thirty pages long, is jam packed full of grotesque scenes and hallucinations. The classic art is tainted with depictions of murder and bugs. So many bugs. I was sucked in from the moment I started it, and loved it.

    The main character is Adrian, who has been fighting horrible nightmares for longer than he's like to admit, and they've morphed into hallucinations. Another character Molly, convinces him that the only way he's going to fix his mental health without checking into a mental hospital is by talking to someone who does hypnosis, although it's not what he expects when he gets there.

    Honestly I wasn't sure what to expect from this, but I'm glad I read it. It was a quick read, although most books like this are, and I really enjoyed it. The characters are interesting and act like anyone would, given their situations. I definitely want to check out volume two if I get the chance. It has everything. A depressing main character, an exciting story, reincarnation, crazy monsters, blood, and a disturbing amount of bugs and people licking nasty blood covered knives. What else could you ask for? It's completely unique to anything I've read lately. Check it out for yourself!

    Here's a link to the book on Amazon, and another link to the authors twitter.

    Thanks for reading! Check out this review and more at my blog.

    (Radioactivebookreviews.wordpress.com)

  • Jamie Connolly

    It’s a cool story. It’s only getting off the ground and was still building when the book ended on a cliffhanger. As a reader I didn’t get answers to any questions. Like,” what the hell is going on?” For example. Had I known I probably would have read volume 1 and 2 at the same time, but that doesn’t take any credit away from the story, which is very good. They are hinting at a world from a past life, maybe 16th or 17th century, and some benevolent evil that has lingered on inside the body of a m

    It’s a cool story. It’s only getting off the ground and was still building when the book ended on a cliffhanger. As a reader I didn’t get answers to any questions. Like,” what the hell is going on?” For example. Had I known I probably would have read volume 1 and 2 at the same time, but that doesn’t take any credit away from the story, which is very good. They are hinting at a world from a past life, maybe 16th or 17th century, and some benevolent evil that has lingered on inside the body of a man haunted by vivid hallucinations. Regression therapy is used to cure these visions but so far only succeeds in allowing the evil entity to take over the mans body. So anyway. 4 stars for now and we will see what happens in volume 2

  • Chad

    A man suffering from waking nightmares goes to a hypnotist for help. The hypnotist wakes a murderer from a past life during regression therapy and people start dying off. There's also some cult involved and a lot of body horror involving insects. I found the story uninteresting, too slowly paced, and the art subpar. I expected a lot more from the author of 6th Gun and Harrow County.

    Received an advanced copy from Image and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  • Annie Slasher (Booked & Loaded)

    This is an original review from

    Horror books are always subjective. So many times horror works - or don't work - based on your own fears. Sometimes, horror books touch on topics that make us uncomfortable and snag on our secret insecurities. Often, I feel how one reacts to horror often reveals more about a person then how they react to a love story. That being said, Regression is not a shock-and-awe type of horror comic. This character driven story pulled me in and left me cr

    This is an original review from

    Horror books are always subjective. So many times horror works - or don't work - based on your own fears. Sometimes, horror books touch on topics that make us uncomfortable and snag on our secret insecurities. Often, I feel how one reacts to horror often reveals more about a person then how they react to a love story. That being said, Regression is not a shock-and-awe type of horror comic. This character driven story pulled me in and left me creeped out, in the best way possible. Adrian is self aware and conflicted, making him a unique type of protagonist.

    My biggest beef is really that his best friend would just kind of tag alone with the murder-ride, but I am going to cut slack in this area and I will explain why. Molly is Adrian's only friend and an artist, who is channeling or has some kind of connection overall. What, exactly? Well, hell...I don't know and I really hope we find out. The second reason is that she seems to be able to take care of herself and I like that writers did a good job with making her non-stereotypical.

    The art seemed to grow a bit between the first issue and last within this volume. I am not sure if it was the escalation of dark imagery in the story or just growth within the artist, but by the middle of this volume I really started to become aware of the unique detailing in certain aspects. This really focused the art and story at key moments. The stone feel with soft colors really is a unique and beautiful combination and complimented the story.

    All in all this first volume of Regression is entertaining and left me hungering for more. If you are a fan of horror comics, Regression is certainly one you need to check out!

  • Molly

    Bunn really jumps right into the story, not providing a lot of background or preamble. It's not quite clear at the end of this volume

    what is going on with our protagonist, Adrian, but I am definitely interested enough to keep reading the series. The epilogue for this collection is what really got me, though - I didn't realize that Bunn's dad was a hypnotist, or that Bunn was once featured as the 'world's youngest hypnotist'.

    For me, that explains quite a bit about how Bunn is so good at

    Bunn really jumps right into the story, not providing a lot of background or preamble. It's not quite clear at the end of this volume

    what is going on with our protagonist, Adrian, but I am definitely interested enough to keep reading the series. The epilogue for this collection is what really got me, though - I didn't realize that Bunn's dad was a hypnotist, or that Bunn was once featured as the 'world's youngest hypnotist'.

    For me, that explains quite a bit about how Bunn is so good at creating strange worlds like the one here and the one in Harrow County . . . which reminds me, I'm about two volumes behind on that series and now I am going to go catch up!

  • Maruko

    Great art, colours less so, not much plot, strange insect murdery cult thing and similarly flavoured hallucinations.

    Was excited to read this, but it sadly failed to meet expectations.

    My biggest beef is Molly’s characterisation. Awesome that she kicked Adrian’s butt when he went all murderer on her, but then two seconds later she’s all “oh it’s fine, you poor boy, let me help you.” Like, apparently the fact he just killed her friend/colleague and attacked her doesn’t matter. Sorry, calling bull

    Great art, colours less so, not much plot, strange insect murdery cult thing and similarly flavoured hallucinations.

    Was excited to read this, but it sadly failed to meet expectations.

    My biggest beef is Molly’s characterisation. Awesome that she kicked Adrian’s butt when he went all murderer on her, but then two seconds later she’s all “oh it’s fine, you poor boy, let me help you.” Like, apparently the fact he just killed her friend/colleague and attacked her doesn’t matter. Sorry, calling bullshit on that reaction. Then, of course, she continues to act like an idiot for no good reason. It just screamed “man wrote this.”

    Points for a poc protagonist, but not going to continue to read this.

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