Artemis by Andy Weir

Artemis

Jazz Bashara is a criminal.Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to com...

Title:Artemis
Author:
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Edition Language:English

Artemis Reviews

  • Raeleen Lemay

    I HAVE SUCH MIXED FEELINGS.

    The first half of this book was very fun, and the plot was interesting and all that. The only thing that bugged me was the writing style, which I suppose is similar to

    , but I felt it was a better fit with that story, and with

    it just felt forced. Other than that though, I was loving it! This book could have easily been 4 or 5 stars from me.

    Then, around the halfway point, the book sort of lost me. The overall plot for this story is Jazz performing a

    I HAVE SUCH MIXED FEELINGS.

    The first half of this book was very fun, and the plot was interesting and all that. The only thing that bugged me was the writing style, which I suppose is similar to

    , but I felt it was a better fit with that story, and with

    it just felt forced. Other than that though, I was loving it! This book could have easily been 4 or 5 stars from me.

    Then, around the halfway point, the book sort of lost me. The overall plot for this story is Jazz performing a heist, and I was expecting it to take the whole book, but the main part of the heist itself finishes around the middle of the book. Of course, there is plenty of backlash and more conflict that arises, but it wasn't what I was expecting, which could be partly the reason for me not enjoying the book as much.

    All in all, I'm glad I read this, and I'm now anxiously awaiting Andy Weir's next book! I just hope whatever he writes next is from a male perspective because although I appreciate his effort, Jazz's voice just sounded like Mark Watney pretending to be a woman.

  • Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    A new book from Andy Weir? Happening on the moon? A heist where the main character survives with her scientific knowledge?

    COUNT ME IN!!

    I was so excited for this book but I didn't end up loving nearly as much as The Martian.

    Even though I liked the overall idea, I didn't like the characters and the constant jokes and insults felt incredibly forced.

    The main character Jazz, a 26 years old woman, was talking and thinking like a cringy 15 years old boy. She mentions a few times her appearance and sexu

    A new book from Andy Weir? Happening on the moon? A heist where the main character survives with her scientific knowledge?

    COUNT ME IN!!

    I was so excited for this book but I didn't end up loving nearly as much as The Martian.

    Even though I liked the overall idea, I didn't like the characters and the constant jokes and insults felt incredibly forced.

    The main character Jazz, a 26 years old woman, was talking and thinking like a cringy 15 years old boy. She mentions a few times her appearance and sexuality in an unnatural way. I don't understand why men authors struggle so hard to write female characters.

    At one point, she stays the night at a friend's house and after showering she wears one of his shirts. He comes back and, him being awkward with women, simply stares at her not knowing what to say. She thinks to herself "I was pretty sexy I have to admit"... really?

    Most characters had cringy moments like this and it ruined the book for me.

    I'm still not sure how to review the ending so I'll have to sleep on it and come back for an update!

    UPDATE: After thinking about it, I wanted to add that it was interesting to read about the heist with the scientific knowledge thrown in there but it wasn't enough to make this book a must-read. It didn't live up to my expectations!

  • Bradley

    This book was great.

    I admit to worrying that he wouldn't be able to keep up the quality from The Martian, and this is definitely a very different kind of tale from that, being half a heist novel but otherwise just a great adventure, but he pulls it off. Better than pulling it off, even. I love his characters and the feel of the moon city, Artemis, is vital and detailed.

    But you know what the best part is?

    I was thoroughly entertained during the entire read. The pacing is great, the reveals belie

    This book was great.

    I admit to worrying that he wouldn't be able to keep up the quality from The Martian, and this is definitely a very different kind of tale from that, being half a heist novel but otherwise just a great adventure, but he pulls it off. Better than pulling it off, even. I love his characters and the feel of the moon city, Artemis, is vital and detailed.

    But you know what the best part is?

    I was thoroughly entertained during the entire read. The pacing is great, the reveals believable, the twists unexpected, and the action, delightful. I really couldn't ask for more when it comes to fun science fiction.

    The moon is a great place to have an adventure. There's always the threat of being deported to Earth, the expensive living arrangements, and the law if you're a smuggler, which Jazz is, but there's always suit and engineering and environmental problems to worry about, too. And never forget greed and cupidity and the need to balance being a good person against a ton of intrigue. That's what we've got going on, here, and it's a real treat every step of the way.

    No spoilers, but I can easily say that I had a great time reading it from the first to the last page. Nothing could have pleased me more. The read is solid as hell.

    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC!

  • Emily May

    1 1/2 stars. I really wish I could say I liked this. A couple of years back, I gave in to the hype and read Weir's

    , and I have to say-- I loved it. The scary scenario of being stranded so far away from everything and everyone you know, the very high probability that Mark Watney wouldn't survive, his chirpy sense of humour that keeps him going... unfortunately,

    's plot is convoluted and less exciting.

    Look, I completely get why Mark Watney annoyed

    1 1/2 stars. I really wish I could say I liked this. A couple of years back, I gave in to the hype and read Weir's

    , and I have to say-- I loved it. The scary scenario of being stranded so far away from everything and everyone you know, the very high probability that Mark Watney wouldn't survive, his chirpy sense of humour that keeps him going... unfortunately,

    's plot is convoluted and less exciting.

    Look, I completely get why Mark Watney annoyed some readers and, given that Weir transplanted his personality and awkward sense of humour into Jazz, it might seem a bit contradictory to have a problem with her personality. But, you know, Mark's narration worked for me because I could imagine this man in the middle of space needing to stay peppy and chatty. His inner narrative is conversational because he is talking to himself - and the reader - to avoid losing all hope. With Jazz, it doesn’t work so well.

    Even though Jazz is a woman in her twenties and Arab, she is basically Mark Watney. You can tell Weir really struggled to adapt his writing style in order to write from the perspective of that most alien of all species - THE WOMAN. Jazz has the sense of humour of a twelve-year-old boy. Her constant quips feel forced and unnecessary. Some of the comments she makes about her sex life and body are just... not funny. She's the local lunar tramp, which is, apparently, so hilarious. But her whole narrative is just plain awkward.

    And what grown woman responds like this:

    The real problem for me, though, was that I could not get invested in this

    . I was bored out of my mind with the random talk of gangsters, smuggling, some scientific sabotage blah blah and - oh my god -

    . Mark Watney talked science to explain how he was going to survive and feed himself on Mars; Jazz talks science to explain the mechanics of welding. I couldn't understand why we were supposed to give a damn about this heist, or the whole conspiracy that develops out of it. Who cares whether Jazz earns herself some slugs (lunar currency)? Who cares if that guy who I didn't give a shit about dies?

    Weir takes some minor steps toward making the setting interesting, but then does nothing with it. This lunar colony is run by Kenyans, which is intriguing, but the culture is unmistakably American, and he never expands upon why or how Kenyans came to be controlling space travel. It is like a throwaway fun fact without context or explanation. The main story is also broken up with Jazz's letters to a Kenyan pen pal, starting when she is nine years old, but this never really goes anywhere and feels kind of pointless.

    Also, the author chooses to have a Muslim (non-practicing) narrator, which could lead to important representation, but it's hard not to cringe when he addresses his narrative to a solely white, non-Muslim audience:

    And then goes on to show Jazz using said niqab as a disguise while carrying out criminal activity. She pleasantly declares:

    Yikes.

    It's just a very messy book overall, with a narrator that tries to be Mark Watney and fails, and a plot that tries to be compelling but isn't. Where the science added thrills and realism in

    , here it bogs the story down with boring detail. Weir should stick to survival stories with male narrators.

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  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    On sale today! 3.25 stars - sadly, I'm dropping down from my initial "soft" 4 star rating, on further reflection. Review first posted on

    :

    Life in Artemis, the only human city on the moon, is rough for Jasmine Bashara, a 26 year old delivery person, smuggler, and would-be tourist guide. She fails her EVA (extravehicular activity) Guild exam in, literally, breathtaking fashion; she’s somewhat estranged from her welder father, to whom she owes a huge personal debt; she’s living al

    On sale today! 3.25 stars - sadly, I'm dropping down from my initial "soft" 4 star rating, on further reflection. Review first posted on

    :

    Life in Artemis, the only human city on the moon, is rough for Jasmine Bashara, a 26 year old delivery person, smuggler, and would-be tourist guide. She fails her EVA (extravehicular activity) Guild exam in, literally, breathtaking fashion; she’s somewhat estranged from her welder father, to whom she owes a huge personal debt; she’s living alone in a tiny, claustrophobia-inducing capsule room; she barely gets by on her payments as a porter (supplemented by some judicious smuggling activity). But Jazz wouldn’t want to live any other place ― certainly not on Earth ― and she’s determined to make a success of her life, with no help from anyone.

    So when Trond Landvik, one of the wealthiest people on the moon and a regular customer for Jazz’s smuggled luxuries, offers her a million “slugs” (moon currency) to do a highly illegal sabotage job, Jazz can’t resist. Trond’s intention is to disrupt Sanchez Aluminum’s production of oxygen for long enough that he can take over the business, for reasons he’s cagey about. The job requires Jazz to sneak out of the domed city of Artemis (tough when all comings and goings out of the city’s four airlocks are constantly monitored) and take out four massive anorthite harvester machines. Jazz is both brilliant and determined, and comes up with a complicated scheme worthy of Mark Watney. But the plan doesn’t work out quite the way she intended, organized crime elements get involved, and suddenly it’s a life-and-death situation for Jazz.

    (2017), Andy Weir’s just-published second novel, didn’t engage me nearly to the extent

    did, but it’s action-packed and ― once the crimes finally get rolling ― compulsively readable. There’s a complex crime caper on the moon and lots of geeky hard science details. The domed moon city setting is laid out with a great deal attention to detail; Weir’s world (or moon)-building is fairly elaborate, if not fleshed out quite as completely as I would have liked. I suppose something had to give to work in all the science facts and the too often cringe-worthy jokes.

    The cast of characters in

    is highly diverse, beginning with Jazz herself, a rebellious Arab young woman protagonist. She’s Muslim in heritage, though non-religious and sexually active. Artemis’ government is controlled by Kenya, with a female administrator, and its population is a cross-section of several Earth nationalities. One of Jazz’s friends is gay, though their relationship’s been on the rocks since he “stole” Jazz’s former boyfriend away from her ― ouch. Jazz also has had a Kenyan pen pal since she was nine years old; their mildly interesting letters provide interludes at the end of each chapter, giving us some background information regarding Jazz’s past, and gradually tying back into Jazz’s present circumstances.

    Unfortunately, characterization isn’t otherwise a strong point in

    . Jazz’s juvenile, snarky personality frequently irritated me. She’s a genius ― when motivated, she picks up electronics design and the chemistry underlying high-temperature smelting with a few quick hours of study ― but she often acts in childish, petulant ways because of her pride and rebelliousness. Her character and fondness for crude jokes makes Jazz read more like a teenage boy than a woman in her mid-twenties. Her mantra in life seems to be “nobody can tell me what to do.” Jazz gradually gains a sliver of wisdom and redemption, but it’s limited. The secondary characters are (mostly) appealing personalities, but easily recognizable and one-dimensional types.

    ’s crime caper plot is also a more standard and familiar one; the novel as a whole just isn’t as fresh or compelling as

    . While the hard science details aren’t given short shrift, they flow less smoothly in

    than in

    , bogging down the pace somewhat. However, Weir is clearly making an effort to expand his horizons: along with the greater diversity, the reader is also treated to lessons in wealth inequality, economics, and sciences like welding and smelting. Duct tape even makes a brief but memorable appearance in the plot, in a mic drop scene sure to be appreciated by fans of

    .

    In the end,

    was a reasonably engaging story, but Weir’s shortcomings as an author are more apparent here, with the less gripping plot, than they were in

    . Whether you’ll enjoy

    depends, I think, upon your affinity (or tolerance) for complex crime caper plots, immature protagonists, and an abundance of technical science.

    I received a free copy of this ebook from the publisher and NetGalley for review. Thanks!

    Content note: Somewhat frequent F-bombs; sexually active main character

    .

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    😄

    This book freaking rocks!!

    No, seriously. The book does have science in it but it's not too bad. This is mostly about Jazz who has lived on the moon since she was 6 and now she's in her 20's. Her dad lives on the moon too but they had a falling out and she makes it on her own by doing. . . things.

    I love the character of Jazz. She's funny and does crazy things but never anything to hurt any one.

    AND SHE LIVES ON THE MOON!

    Jazz doesn't live in the good part

    😄

    This book freaking rocks!!

    No, seriously. The book does have science in it but it's not too bad. This is mostly about Jazz who has lived on the moon since she was 6 and now she's in her 20's. Her dad lives on the moon too but they had a falling out and she makes it on her own by doing. . . things.

    I love the character of Jazz. She's funny and does crazy things but never anything to hurt any one.

    AND SHE LIVES ON THE MOON!

    Jazz doesn't live in the good part of town. Yes, the city on the moon is called Artemis and they have their rich side and poor side. It's just too awesome to read about.

    Jazz does some odd jobs as a porter but she also brings in contraband and no it's nothing bad.

    She has a cool friend she emails from Earth, his name is Kelvin. I love their talks.

    Rich people come to the moon every year to spend their holiday. They stay in the fancy hotels and spend tons of money in the shops. Regular folk save up their money so they can come for a once in a life time stay.

    But, life on the moon isn't all that it's cracked up to be. There just has to be some evil mobness going on. There are life and death situations and Jazz in put on the spot to save the whole city.

    That's all I'm saying, you need to read it for yourself. If you loved The Martian (which I did) you will love this book. At least I think you will, I did because IT'S THE MOON! THEY ARE LIVING ON THE MOON!

    And I have to mention some of the people I loved in the book:

    Svoboda

    Dale

    Lene

    Kelvin

    Bob

    Jazz dad

    and some randoms =)

    *I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book*

    MY BLOG:

  • Larry H

    I'm between 3 and 3.5 stars here.

    Although it has been a few years since Andy Weir published

    , he hasn't been missing from the literary world, thanks to his sharing a number of free super-short stories with the reading public. (

    remains my favorite of the bunch.) Even so, I was anxious for him to come out with a new novel.

    Artemis is the first city on the moon. While wealthy tourists get to experience the city's luxuries, for the ordinary citizens living there, it's alm

    I'm between 3 and 3.5 stars here.

    Although it has been a few years since Andy Weir published

    , he hasn't been missing from the literary world, thanks to his sharing a number of free super-short stories with the reading public. (

    remains my favorite of the bunch.) Even so, I was anxious for him to come out with a new novel.

    Artemis is the first city on the moon. While wealthy tourists get to experience the city's luxuries, for the ordinary citizens living there, it's almost like any other city—the struggles between the haves and have-nots, corruption, violence, crime, the usual. (Almost like any other city except for the gravity, and the fact that everything is encased in bubble-type structures to keep the extreme radiation and space dust out.)

    Jazz Bashara is a low-level porter on Artemis. She longs for a better life but doesn't have the motivation to do anything more than what she does, even though she has the brains and the talent for much more. Instead, she ekes out a living as a criminal, smuggling in contraband from Earth for anyone willing to pay her. She doesn't care that it's wrong; in fact, she's more than a little proud to be gaming the system.

    One day, one of Jazz's wealthy regular customers offers her a part in a scheme that seems almost too good to be true, but her part of the spoils would be enough to give her the type of life she has always dreamed of. Of course, what

    too good to be true usually is, and it isn't long before Jazz realizes she's in the middle of something much bigger than a get-rich-quick scheme—there's corruption, and people are willing to go to any lengths to protect what they believe is theirs. Jazz is going to need more than just her street smarts if she's going to survive this.

    Jazz is a pretty fascinating character. She's pretty tough, smart, wily, and not embarrassed about her sexuality or her general laziness. She knows she could achieve more, but for the most part, she isn't motivated to do so through legal channels. I love the fact that Weir created a multi-cultural cast of characters without batting an eye—Jazz is a Saudi Arabian Muslim (albeit non-practicing), and there are characters from different races, religions, cultures, and sexual orientations that don't adhere to stereotypes.

    Until I read

    , I somehow forgot how science-heavy

    was. But while all that science seemed to work in

    it seemed to weigh this book down a bit. (And no, it wasn't the gravity.) Weir has created quite a world, and certainly the descriptions helped paint the scene, but I felt at times the lengthy scientific diatribes pulled the plot off course.

    The other thing that frustrated me about the book is the fact that Jazz speaks and thinks like a teenage boy. Even though you're rooting for her, after a while her lack of maturity started to grate on me.

    Those criticisms notwithstanding, Weir knows how to tell a story. Even though I thought the caper (and that's the best word to describe the scheme Jazz finds herself in) was a little silly, I couldn't stop reading

    . It's a fun and interesting book, and you have to wonder how close to reality Weir's vision of life on the moon will come, if it ever becomes a reality.

    NetGalley and Crown Publishing provided me an advance copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available!

    See all of my reviews at

    .

  • j e w e l s [Books Bejeweled]

    Apologies in advance. You're not gonna like what I have to say.

    Andy Weir has successfully taken the one element I didn't like in THE MARTIAN and expanded on that until ARTEMIS is almost a chore to read. Major disappointment.

    Remember our hero, Mark, in The Martian? His jokey, sarcastic personality started to grate on my nerves towards the end of the book. It's like he never quit with the relentless

    Apologies in advance. You're not gonna like what I have to say.

    Andy Weir has successfully taken the one element I didn't like in THE MARTIAN and expanded on that until ARTEMIS is almost a chore to read. Major disappointment.

    Remember our hero, Mark, in The Martian? His jokey, sarcastic personality started to grate on my nerves towards the end of the book. It's like he never quit with the relentless joking. Staring death in the face? Make a joke. Starving to death? Play some funny music. Ok, we get it! Mark is all about the comic relief. Why does it have to be so overdone and heavy-handed? I still enjoyed the book for all the old-school science fiction fun.

    HOWEVER, after cutting Weir some slack for his forced characterizations in The Martian, I am not so ready to do the same with Artemis.

    Guess what? Jazz, our female protagonist in Artemis, has almost the exact same personality as Mark from The Martian. Ugggggghhhhh. And that goofy, insulting character is even more annoying in a grown woman. Is that sexist? I hope not. I don't mean it to be.

    Oh, and by the way, Jazz is the town tramp (with a heart of gold) because of her reputation for sleeping with so many guys. Hysterical.

    The book starts out very fun to read. I really enjoyed reading how the city of Artemis came to be established on the moon. I loved reading about the actualities of lunar living with 1/6 of the gravity. I liked learning about the moon's surface, dust and atmosphere. There just wasn't enough of the moon facts for me.

    After the first third of the book, I had to push through to finish it. Especially the middle part with all the welding. Take my advice and skim skim skim through the welding. The very end ramps up with some excitement, but not enough to make up of for the rest. Sad.

    I would have liked more moonwalking, less welding. More thinking, less insulting. More imagination, less joking. More sci-fi, less lame comedy.

  • Kemper

    M-O-O-N. That spells Andy Weir’s new novel. (OK, if you haven’t read Stephen King’s

    that joke won’t make sense to you, but rather than think that’s a failure of my review I’m going to say that it’s your own fault for not having read

    . Serves you right.)

    It’s the near future, and there’s a city on the moon called Artemis. Jazz Bashara is a young woman who has grown up there, and knowing the place like the back of h

    M-O-O-N. That spells Andy Weir’s new novel. (OK, if you haven’t read Stephen King’s

    that joke won’t make sense to you, but rather than think that’s a failure of my review I’m going to say that it’s your own fault for not having read

    . Serves you right.)

    It’s the near future, and there’s a city on the moon called Artemis. Jazz Bashara is a young woman who has grown up there, and knowing the place like the back of her hand makes it easier for her to hustle a living legally by being a porter who hauls stuff around. Illegally, she makes money on the side with a smuggling business. If she could get her EVA certification she could make a lot more by showing tourists the sights outside, but a hardware problem makes her fail the test as well as nearly killing her. So when a rich guy offers her a huge payday to perform a dangerous act of sabotage on a business rival Jazz takes the gig. Things don’t go quite as planned and soon Jazz is in danger of being deported back to Earth or murdered, and she isn’t sure which one would be worse.

    Just to get this out of the way: No, it isn’t as good as

    . But it’s still a pretty fun read and got a lot of the stuff I liked about that one so no shame there.

    Weir has built up a lot of detail about life on the moon from the nuts-and-bolts stuff science stuff as well as how the Artemis society functions. One detail I particularly liked is that the moon citizens trade in ‘slugs’ which stands for ‘soft landed grams’ which is a weight based credit system to have things shipped from Earth.

    We’ve also got another likeable lead character in Jazz just as we did with Mark Watney in

    . Jazz is a borderline criminal, not an astronaut, but like Mark she’s got a can-do attitude mixed with a fun way of explaining all the technical stuff to the reader. She’s also got a similar smart-ass nature, and that could have gone wrong because snarky leads can turn into annoying joke machines if not done well. Yet Weir never lets it get away from him and keeps it funny.

    So why not as good as his first book? While it’s great that Weir made his main character a young woman who is a lapsed Muslim he didn’t exactly do anything with those traits. Jazz could have easily been a young male of any religion so it seems like an easy nod to diversity rather than incorporating anything that might have deepened her. Also, while this one has Jazz getting into plenty of predicaments it lacks the tension that

    had its best. Granted, one is a survival story and one is more of a sci-fi thriller so it’s comparing apples to giraffes to some extent, but I just never felt like Jazz was in any real danger whereas I legitimately didn’t know if Watney would make it off Mars.

    Still, it’s got the same kind of enthusiastic attitude of his first book, and it’s nice to read about smart people doing smart things. This isn’t great literature, but Weir has an entertaining style. He’s also great at blending science, story, and humor into a nice little sci-fi stew.

  • Lola  Reviewer

    Seems to me that Andy Weir rushed to write this book.

    Oh man, what a disappointment. And an even bigger disappointment that it won the science fiction category of the Goodreads Choice Awards. (Just because the author is popular.)

    To be honest, I didn’t even realize Jazz Bashara was a woman until specific pronouns were used. That certainly did not take long, but even after I made that realization, I couldn’t shake the feeling that Jazz’s personality matched that of a man more.

    But that’s probably be

    Seems to me that Andy Weir rushed to write this book.

    Oh man, what a disappointment. And an even bigger disappointment that it won the science fiction category of the Goodreads Choice Awards. (Just because the author is popular.)

    To be honest, I didn’t even realize Jazz Bashara was a woman until specific pronouns were used. That certainly did not take long, but even after I made that realization, I couldn’t shake the feeling that Jazz’s personality matched that of a man more.

    But that’s probably because I’ve read other works by this author, works that included a male hero, and their voices sound really, really similar. Is it just me, though?

    What awful writing. I can’t believe this is the same author who wrote THE MARTIAN. It’s like Andy Weir wrote everything that came to his mind, without even processing the information. Maybe if he’d done that, he would have realized that some of the things he wrote were truly, astonishingly offensive.

    Some are going to say that he’s ‘‘keeping it real’’. You know, ‘‘telling it like it is’’, but all he’s doing is perpetrating stereotypes and racist ways of thinking, like him implying that a niqab is a mask that raises suspicion.* It’s just so wrong for him to say that.

    I needed this book to be more serious and considerate of other nationalities and cultures and actually have a female character I could connect with, but I disliked Jazz profusely.

    Goodbye, book. Do not take care. DNF.

    * Jazz said, ''Great way to wear a mask without arousing suspicion'' (on page 74) and I thought she was being sarcastic, because of her personality and lack of ''It's a'' before the word ''great''. That was my first thought. Perhaps I'm wrong - it's very much possible - but the writing confused me at times.

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