We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories by Gabrielle Union

We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “A book of essays as raw and honest as anyone has ever produced.” — Lena Dunham, Lenny Letter In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please, Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, and Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman.One month before the...

Title:We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories
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Edition Language:English

We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories Reviews

  • Erin

    I love Gabrielle Union!

    I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.

    Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it.

    We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what interests you

    I love Gabrielle Union!

    I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.

    Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it.

    We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what interests you this isn't your book. We're Going To Need More Wine is a collection of essays that touch on pivotal moments in her life. I prefer essays over memoirs, because honestly I don't care about where you we're born or what elementary school you attended unless its a supercool story(its usually not).

    So if you love Gabrielle Union,

    Read this book.

    If you love books written by strong women about strong women,

    Read this book.

    If you just enjoy hilarious and honest storytelling,

    Read this book.

    Basically

    READ THIS BOOK!

  • Andre

    If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollyw

    If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollywood, sexuality, school, college, step-parenting, marriage, divorce and even rape. She manages to tell these stories with a fearlessness that entertains as well as informs. Like a high-wire act with no safety net.

    Gabrielle comes across as a very thoughtful, likable, brave and funny woman, one that I think readers would indeed enjoy a glass of wine with. There are of course elements of memoir, as she takes us through her school years growing up in the suburbs of California, one of the few Black girls in her schools of Pleasanton, CA. There are also elements of essay, like the chapter called Mittens which deals with how Blacks are perceived and policed, and how we often go out of our way to make accommodations to those perceptions. In reference to this she says, "Worse, I am told that people don’t want to hear these stories, but the reality is we experience life in a never-ending loop in which we are told that if we just “make it,” we will enjoy the fruits of our labor: assimilation."

    But what makes this book special are the stories and the way she tells them. And digesting the stories on the whole, we see her blossom into the confident audacious and vivacious woman she is presently. She wasn't always the beautiful woman we think of, when we hear the name Gabrielle Union. In fact she describes herself at an early age,"I was so thin that I looked like a black daddy longlegs spider with buckteeth. This is not overly earnest, false-humility celebrity speak, I swear."It is those type of self-deprecating comments along with the willingness to bare it all that portends an air of authenticity. If you are a fan, you will become a bigger fan and if you're not than surely you will become one after reading these stories from Gabrielle Union. Thanks to Edelweiss and Dey St. books for an advanced ebook. Book drops 10/17/17.

  • Reading in Black & White

    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly w

    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly white community, relationships, sex, racism, the pressure of dealing with public perception, friendships, and most importantly, the freedom one can feel when they decide to truly be themselves.

  • Read In Colour

    Very open & honest, Gabrielle Union is not just a pretty face. She's really smart and really funny and now I want to be her BFF.

  • Seymone

    She spoke to the nuances of my life.

    I loved this memoir!!! Will reread and take my time with her words.

  • Cherrelle Shelton

    Gabrielle Union was funny and honest in her collection of essays. There were parts of her book where I laughed, where I teared up, and where I said "I know that's right!" out loud ☺ She was so relatable, explaining situations that I kind of thought I was alone in. I already loved her as an amazing actress, but this book made me love her even more.

    Gabrielle Union was funny and honest in her collection of essays. There were parts of her book where I laughed, where I teared up, and where I said "I know that's right!" out loud ☺️ She was so relatable, explaining situations that I kind of thought I was alone in. I already loved her as an amazing actress, but this book made me love her even more.

  • Ariel

    More like 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a chronological play-by-play of Gabrielle Union's life, this book isn't it. Instead, this book feels--exactly like the author says in the introduction--like meeting up with one of your really thoughtful and worldly friends, reminiscing over a few glasses of wine and laughing so loud with each other that everyone in the restaurant is staring.

    The books starts with her as young awkward black girl, spending the school year with predominantly white friends

    More like 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a chronological play-by-play of Gabrielle Union's life, this book isn't it. Instead, this book feels--exactly like the author says in the introduction--like meeting up with one of your really thoughtful and worldly friends, reminiscing over a few glasses of wine and laughing so loud with each other that everyone in the restaurant is staring.

    The books starts with her as young awkward black girl, spending the school year with predominantly white friends and classmates in Pleaseanton, California, and summers with her extended family in Omaha, Nebraska. We then follow her through college, her first marriage and eventual divorce, to the beginning of her career, second marriage and her induction into true Hollywood fame (aka, being invited to Prince's house).

    The beginning narratives deal with the typical coming-of-age topics such as crushing on boys, stealing booze, dealing with parents and navigating the halls of highschool, but are deepened with her thoughts on being an outsider, code switching and trying to downplay her blackness in California, then doing the exact opposite in Nebraska when surrounded by her family and Omaha's rising gang violence. Later chapters deal with more adult topics, including rape and PTSD, post-divorce depression, being Hollywood mean-girl and her thoughts on the black Hollywood elite.

    This book feels surprisingly honest. She doesn't shy away from the intimate details of her marriage, including their prenup, her feelings about being a stepmom to growing black boys, and the fact that she calls her husband, Dwyane Wade, basketball superstar, "poopy." Even more shockingly honest is her experience with multiple miscarriages, a chapter brilliantly called "Get Out of My Pussy." She's definitely not afraid to talk about serious issues and to point out her own flaws as black woman, as a friend, wife, and actress. There were several paragraphs where I thought, "I would NEVER admit that out loud, much less in a memoir to be read by people who don't know me!"

    The writing style sort of goes back and forth from super casual to college essay. Any time she brings the issue away from the personal and into the universal, her tone felt a little stilted and soapbox-y. There is one section where she's listing statistics that really stuck out as odd to me, but she's always able to end a chapter back to the personal, funny tone I preferred.

    Oh yeah, Gabrielle Union is funny--like, laugh out loud, "omg I can't believe she said that," kiki-ing funny. Did I mention there's a scene of her putting yogurt into her vagina with a straw? Yes, you read that right. I've never considered how famous women deal with buying Monistat at crowded CVS, but in Union's case--they don't. They improvise.

  • Isabel Jones

    This woman is a national fucking treasure

  • Michael

    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I w

    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I was impressed with how this book read like a conversation with friends. I liked how she was so blunt with her language, never being afraid to use explicit words when necessary.

    There were many highlights in this book, but I don't want to spoil anything. It is a very witty and memorable book that will have you laughing so loud, whether it was intentional or not. I did not really like the ending but because I was immersed in every chapter, I rounded it up to five stars.

    Really good memoir, trust me after reading this, you are going to need more wine!

  • Lekeisha The Booknerd

    This book is so relevant. So relevant, that it needs to be passed around and be required reading for young black girls. And hey, I know that a lot of females, not matter your race (and males, if I'm to be honest) can relate to these stories. True stories. Like, this stuff is so honest that I cringed at certain points. Gabrielle lays it all out on the table. Some stories are even funny (I hope you never see Queeshaun again, Gabby), and then there are the ones that I definitely could relate to the

    This book is so relevant. So relevant, that it needs to be passed around and be required reading for young black girls. And hey, I know that a lot of females, not matter your race (and males, if I'm to be honest) can relate to these stories. True stories. Like, this stuff is so honest that I cringed at certain points. Gabrielle lays it all out on the table. Some stories are even funny (I hope you never see Queeshaun again, Gabby), and then there are the ones that I definitely could relate to the most. Growing up trying to live in opposite worlds. Except, my worlds were reversed. And I think all black girls have been exposed to colorism in their communities. "The standard of beauty and intelligence that has historically been praised by the oppressor has been adopted by the oppressed."

    Truer words have never been spoken. This is some honest shit. I can see how some will take offense or disagree, but you have been warned. Thank you, Gabrielle, for writing these hilarious & heartfelt stories.

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