Power and Empire by Marc Cameron

Power and Empire

President Jack Ryan is dealing with an aggressive challenge from the Chinese government. Pawns are being moved around a global chessboard, an attack on an oil platform in Africa, a terrorist attack on an American destroyer and a storm-tossed American spy ship that may fall into Chinese hands. It seems that Premier Zhou is determined to limit Ryan’s options in the upcoming...

Title:Power and Empire
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Edition Language:English

Power and Empire Reviews

  • The Real Book Spy

    When the CGSL Orion, a massive Chinese oil tanker, explodes in a blast of white light while in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, questions quickly rise regarding the ship’s contents.

    In Texas, Department of Public Safety trooper Roy Calderon makes what appears to be a routine traffic stop. Instead, the stop turns out to be anything but routine, when a frail young girl was rescued after being held against her will and used in a child sex ring. The feel

    When the CGSL Orion, a massive Chinese oil tanker, explodes in a blast of white light while in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, questions quickly rise regarding the ship’s contents.

    In Texas, Department of Public Safety trooper Roy Calderon makes what appears to be a routine traffic stop. Instead, the stop turns out to be anything but routine, when a frail young girl was rescued after being held against her will and used in a child sex ring. The feel-good rescue takes a sudden turn when it’s revealed that the girl is in possession of a thumb drive that belonged to Eddie Feng, a Chinese journalist with connections to players on both sides of the law, and the very man whom Jack Ryan Junior and the rest of the Campus operators are busy searching for.

    When Feng’s drive shows a connection between him and a payment that was made the same day the CGSL Orion exploded, members of the Campus break into pursuit of the journalist, though their top-secret mission becomes intertwined with the FBI’s own investigation and search for Feng — complicating matters considerably.

    As usual, a very hands-on John Clark leads the Campus’ mission with his calm, cool-under-pressure approach. However, the old operative–who is portrayed here much in the same way Clancy wrote him in Without Remorse (1993)–shows on more than one occasion that when the situation calls for it, he can still be extremely efficient and devastatingly lethal in the field.

    One of the book’s more colorful scenes involves Clark sneaking into the house of a suspect, only to meet serious resistance from the man’s heavyset girlfriend, who attacks him and attempts to drag him into a pool. Clark, a former Navy SEAL, gives the woman what she wants, and happily takes their wrestling match into the deep end. Later, he quips, “I am old. But an old SEAL still loves the water.” It’s one of many really strong scenes that Cameron has written around Clancy’s best characters, taking full advantage of the deep roster he inherited.

    As other seemingly random events occur around the world, President Jack Ryan and his administration start connecting the dots. With the upcoming G20 negotiations just around the corner, it’s obvious that the Chinese president is doing his best to handcuff Ryan and limit his options. While the Campus does their work in the shadows, Ryan must find a way to get ahead of President Zaho before the two countries engage in an all-out war.

    Marc Cameron, who has long been one of the thriller genre’s most underrated authors, rises to the challenge of replacing Mark Greaney to continue Tom Clancy’s franchise in high-powered fashion. Going out of his way to alter his own writing style, Cameron does a convincing job adapting to Clancy’s overall style, including how he sets up his plot and creates threads for later on.

    For a universe as vast as the one Clancy created, Cameron obviously did his homework. Not only is the plot well-written, but the characters all feel real and authentic, something diehard fans will no doubt appreciate. The Ryan in this book reads very much like the version portrayed by Harrison Ford, coming off as calculated and poised, but with a touch of panache. Always the smartest guy in the room, Cameron’s version of Jack Ryan is true to form, and a ton of fun to read.

    When Clark isn’t stealing scenes, Ryan’s new special agent in charge, Gary Montgomery, shines as well. Montgomery and Ryan quickly form a “stellar” relationship, and the new lead Secret Service agent is likely to become a fan-favorite moving forward.

    Expectations were high for Marc Cameron’s first Clancy novel, but the veteran author proved to be the right man for the job.

    is a terrific, high-concept political thriller written with the same finesse and style that Clancy’s fans have come to expect.

    Author: Marc Cameron

    Series: Jack Ryan Universe #24

    Pages: 592 (Hardcover)

    ISBN: 0735215898

    Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons

    Release Date: November 28, 2017

    Book Spy Rating: 8.5/10

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  • Mark Hopkin

    I have a friend who knows how to get things, so I got an advance copy of Power and Empire a little while before it went on sale. What an awesome book! I was already a fan of Marc Cameron from his Jericho Quinn series, so I was excited when I heard he was writing a Clancy book. He nailed it. This book has all the elements of a great Clancy novel. It's filled with esoteric facts that make you feel like you could run a ship or the White House when you're done reading, but more importantly, the stor

    I have a friend who knows how to get things, so I got an advance copy of Power and Empire a little while before it went on sale. What an awesome book! I was already a fan of Marc Cameron from his Jericho Quinn series, so I was excited when I heard he was writing a Clancy book. He nailed it. This book has all the elements of a great Clancy novel. It's filled with esoteric facts that make you feel like you could run a ship or the White House when you're done reading, but more importantly, the story grabs you and doesn't let go until the last page. And just like in real life, the world is still a dangerous place when it's done, so we can look forward to the next installment. Cameron hit his first Clancy novel out of the park. I hope it's the beginning of a long series.

  • Richard

    Scott Brick is a very pleasing narrator. He seems to have become the voice of the Clancy/Ryan universe.

    The story by Marc Cameron pulls in elements from several Clancy novels in an updated format.

    John Clark is wrestling with his nature and inner demons revisiting "Without Remorse".

    Jack Ryan Jr. still seems a little vague. He doesn't know if he's Jack Reacher or Mitch Rapp.

    President Jack Ryan is a fully developed character as there is in this universe. May be part of that perception is from foll

    Scott Brick is a very pleasing narrator. He seems to have become the voice of the Clancy/Ryan universe.

    The story by Marc Cameron pulls in elements from several Clancy novels in an updated format.

    John Clark is wrestling with his nature and inner demons revisiting "Without Remorse".

    Jack Ryan Jr. still seems a little vague. He doesn't know if he's Jack Reacher or Mitch Rapp.

    President Jack Ryan is a fully developed character as there is in this universe. May be part of that perception is from following the novels since "The Hunt For Red October" (1st in publication order and 4th in the series).

    Other supporting characters made appearances throughout the globe trotting novel.

    This is a good read.

  • Marika Charalambous

    Another wonderful Jack Ryan book, this time written by Marc Cameron. I have to say that he a great job there, preserving the whole Jack Ryan Universe just the way Tom Clancy left it.

    There are several threads running through the book, all of which will, of course, intersect at the end to bring the book to its powerful conclusion. I am only sad because now I have to wait yet another year for a next Jack Ryan story.

    Having never read anything that Marc Cameron has written solo so far, I'll start hun

    Another wonderful Jack Ryan book, this time written by Marc Cameron. I have to say that he a great job there, preserving the whole Jack Ryan Universe just the way Tom Clancy left it.

    There are several threads running through the book, all of which will, of course, intersect at the end to bring the book to its powerful conclusion. I am only sad because now I have to wait yet another year for a next Jack Ryan story.

    Having never read anything that Marc Cameron has written solo so far, I'll start hunting down his own books, I've read they're awesome as well.

    Full review:

  • Richard

    The Jack Ryan continuing series is in good hands. Marc Cameron has taken the reins from another great author Mark Greaney, to keep All the wonderful characters of “The Campus” on point and on mission, and it’s great!

    I love Marc Cameron’s writing style, as in all novels, there are 4 or 5 ongoing stories that relate to each other and then coalesce into a finale. I find in many if not most books I read that there is usually only 1 of the multiple related stories I really care about (usually the boo

    The Jack Ryan continuing series is in good hands. Marc Cameron has taken the reins from another great author Mark Greaney, to keep All the wonderful characters of “The Campus” on point and on mission, and it’s great!

    I love Marc Cameron’s writing style, as in all novels, there are 4 or 5 ongoing stories that relate to each other and then coalesce into a finale. I find in many if not most books I read that there is usually only 1 of the multiple related stories I really care about (usually the books hero, if you will), not so with Marc Cameron! Each of the 4 or 5 mini plots is as good as the other. My interest never lags, he keeps the excitement high throughout the book. Well done!

  • Tony Nielsen

    Tom Clancy died in 2013 after a hugely successful writing career which began with the bestseller and mega movie "Hunt for Red October". The transition from Clancy to Marc Cameron in continuing with the franchise has been seamless. Cameron has absolutely nailed the feel and atmosphere of Tom Clancy's writing, especially with the Jack Ryan series.

    In "Power and Empire" much of the focus is on President Jack Ryan's son Jack Junior and his colleagues in The Campus, a super secret and privately funded

    Tom Clancy died in 2013 after a hugely successful writing career which began with the bestseller and mega movie "Hunt for Red October". The transition from Clancy to Marc Cameron in continuing with the franchise has been seamless. Cameron has absolutely nailed the feel and atmosphere of Tom Clancy's writing, especially with the Jack Ryan series.

    In "Power and Empire" much of the focus is on President Jack Ryan's son Jack Junior and his colleagues in The Campus, a super secret and privately funded organisation, which carries out missions that wouldn't be possible officially.

    President Ryan and his team are doing their best to maintain a workable relationship with China's leader Zhou. In the background there is a power struggle being played out in China, with the potential to force a showdown with the USA.

    A routine travel stop on an isolated rural Texas road leads to the discovery of a stolen USB stick which contains sensational information that links a number of seemingly disparate terrorism and points to an imminent threat from the Chinese.

    Jack Junior and the Campus chase the action from Europe to South America and beyond as they try and neutralise the threat and get to the core of the various threads that unveil the big picture.

    Cameron has delivered a fine adventure yarn in the best Tom Clancy tradition.

  • Norma

    Clancy's characters remain alive and relatively well under the deft hand of Marc Cameron. Though I was skeptical at first, I have found Clancy's work being treated with the utmost respect. Reading this series is like binge watching Netflix.

  • David

    The crew is back and Marc Cameron has proven to have the knack for writing in the Tom Clancy Style. This story is a little odd in that it attempts to intertwine child human trafficking with Chinese leadership intrigue. One other odd issue is the timeline which now has John Patrick Ryan as the president for the 22nd year, assuming the 1995 Debt of Honor was his start. Even so, the characters and pace for this story was fun. I give Power and Empire four stars.

  • Will

    READER'S SUBJECTIVE REVIEW WITH PLOT SPOILERS FOLLOWS:

    By my count there have been four writers replicating TC in the Clancy Enterprise, and not all of 'em tell a story with the same panache. However, Marc Cameron hit all the right buttons in 'Power and Empire,' and I salute him for transforming the Jack Ryan series in the nick of time. What I thought was a general lack of romantic play in the Series suddenly came to life a few instalments ago when Jack Jr. sorta morphed into Iranian Ysabel Kash

    READER'S SUBJECTIVE REVIEW WITH PLOT SPOILERS FOLLOWS:

    By my count there have been four writers replicating TC in the Clancy Enterprise, and not all of 'em tell a story with the same panache. However, Marc Cameron hit all the right buttons in 'Power and Empire,' and I salute him for transforming the Jack Ryan series in the nick of time. What I thought was a general lack of romantic play in the Series suddenly came to life a few instalments ago when Jack Jr. sorta morphed into Iranian Ysabel Kashani's boyfriend. This was about the same time that Logistics Director and hot-bodied Adara Sherman went through operative apprenticeship and 'blam' she's the live-in with Dom Caruso. So somebody got the message that the Campus wasn't gonna flourish with tough guys alone forever. Now Marc Cameron has figured it out; we don't wanna read about some mano-e-mano struggle, even it it's a good storyline. Why the hell you think James Bond has flourished as an enterprise for six decades? It's because females play key parts in both the good and evil organizations!

    In 'Power and Empire,' Cameron introduces us to four hot-bodied, kick-ass female operatives, what I call 'black widows' in my novels, EACH on the protagonist as well as the antagonist sides! Add in the victims of sex slave trading--an aberration before God--and there is a very friendly feel to the web and flow of 'Power and Empire.' So basically Cameron's created the right mix of characters, so all's he needs is a compelling and relevant storyline. He knocks it out of the park.

    Now all of my novels occur in the early 1980s, so the KGB and the cartels are the evil being coped with. Now the Cold War ended 26 years ago, so since that time my favorite action-adventure authors have almost singularly focused on the Islamic jihadists as the bad guys. Truthfully, I've grown tired of reading the next and more bizarre storyline of jihadi bedevilment. In spite of the liberal Hillary press' attempts, Putin and the Russians ain't our sworn enemy anymore. Now ISIS ain't giving up, but I'm tired of reading about 'em. So why not focus on the Western Pacific where the true and last communist regimes still plot for supremacy? I know, Cuba's still one too, but with everybody earning the same $200 a month, Raul can't last forever. Anyway, the North Koreans probably do the most sabre rattling, but the People's Republic is where true mysterious mischief becomes believable in a storyline--and Cameron captured it believably in 'Power and Empire.'

    The reason I like Cameron's fiction story is that the PRC President Zhao Chengzhi is really a fairly squared away guy trying to overcome and downplay the excesses of his predecessor. Unfortunately his Foreign Minister Li Zhengsheng and PLA Director of Central Security Bureau LGEN Xu Jinlong as well as the PLA Commander want to push the Empire back to its glory days, including taking back Taiwan, proclaiming the South China Sea their backyard pond and generally irritating the US Navy in any means possible. Along the way they employ some fixers from the dark side, and this leads into the prominent sidebar of the sex slave trade in Central America and the border states. Anyway, Zhao knows Li and Xu are conspiring against him, even plotting terror activities to madden US President Jack Ryan sufficiently for him to bow up and strike out at the PRC again. It all comes to a head at a meeting of G20 in Tokyo, where Li's bold plan to assassinate Zhao and Ryan is foiled by the Campus, but Jack Ryan Jr.'s in the crosshairs of danger.

    Now to bring it all full circle and leave us feeling good about life, Jack Jr. opts not to return to DC with his Campus mates once they've secured the scene in Tokyo. Nah, Jack Jr.'s a strong heterosexual agent who has to endure the Adara Sherman-Dom Caruso hookup every day of his life. Enter Koanchosa-cho, Japan's Public Security Intelligence Agency, operative Monzaki Yukiko who's also unattached--and the mission's over and time to kick back and relax. He obviously is able to forget they met running through an underground sewer in Buenos, the stink of which he's uncertain he can ever wash off. Nah, they're gonna go get lost hiking up Mount Fuji, or the story would lead us to believe. I musta missed something; what happened to Ysabel?

    Get this book, read it and enjoy it. I think you'll agree with me that Marc Cameron stumbled onto the cure for the common action novel. Good going bro.

  • Tom Tischler

    The world seems to be shaking from seemingly desperate outbursts of terrorism. Jack

    Ryan prepares for a crucial negotiation with President Zhoc's hostile China. But when a

    routine traffic stop in rural Texas leads to the discovery of a stolen USB stick it becomes

    clear that there is a strong connection between these attacks. With tensions rising a U.S.

    spy ship gets caught up in a violent storm and is being pushed into the path of a Chinese

    Navy ship with potentially dangerous consequences .As an

    The world seems to be shaking from seemingly desperate outbursts of terrorism. Jack

    Ryan prepares for a crucial negotiation with President Zhoc's hostile China. But when a

    routine traffic stop in rural Texas leads to the discovery of a stolen USB stick it becomes

    clear that there is a strong connection between these attacks. With tensions rising a U.S.

    spy ship gets caught up in a violent storm and is being pushed into the path of a Chinese

    Navy ship with potentially dangerous consequences .As an international summit approaches

    the master mind behind this violence remains at large. Jack Ryan has no choice but to face

    Zhou. Little does he know that he is walking into the jaws of the dragon. Reading this you

    almost believe that Clancy has returned. Marc Cameron writes in his style and this book

    shows it. This is book 24 in the Jack Ryan series and I gave it a 4.5


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