The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World by Jeff Goodell

The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World

An eye-opening and essential tour of the vanishing world What if Atlantis wasn't a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding? Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining...

Title:The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World
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Edition Language:English

The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World Reviews

  • Vintage Science Fiction Month--January The Haunted Reading Room

    Review: THE WATER WILL COME by Jeff Goodell

    An articulate and thoroughly-considered explication of sea level rise, THE WATER WILL COME is scientific journalism as it ought to be, explaining science, geological history and engineering in an understandable fashion. Mr. Goodell never resorts to scare tactics; his understated and factual approach to climate change, global warming, melting of ice sheets, and consequent inescapable rise of sea level is frightening in itself, and should serve as a wake-

    Review: THE WATER WILL COME by Jeff Goodell

    An articulate and thoroughly-considered explication of sea level rise, THE WATER WILL COME is scientific journalism as it ought to be, explaining science, geological history and engineering in an understandable fashion. Mr. Goodell never resorts to scare tactics; his understated and factual approach to climate change, global warming, melting of ice sheets, and consequent inescapable rise of sea level is frightening in itself, and should serve as a wake-up call across the globe.

  • Bam

    The water will come. Anyone who has ever lived near water knows that water will find its way in if it has a mind to. This book is largely about rising sea levels caused by climate change and melting glaciers and its impact on our society, for the truth is our climate is changing and causing unusual weather patterns and problems around the world.

    Personal experiences: Our midwest home has been flooded twice by creek water in the last ten years after torrential rain storms. And while we were in Ar

    The water will come. Anyone who has ever lived near water knows that water will find its way in if it has a mind to. This book is largely about rising sea levels caused by climate change and melting glaciers and its impact on our society, for the truth is our climate is changing and causing unusual weather patterns and problems around the world.

    Personal experiences: Our midwest home has been flooded twice by creek water in the last ten years after torrential rain storms. And while we were in Aruba recently, which has a desert climate, the area was hit by a thunderstorm that dumped three inches of rain in about an hour, blowing the manhole covers off sewers and flooding the streets with a foot of water. The local residents were amazed--they NEVER get rains like that.

    Whatever happened to nice, gentle, soaking rains? Do you know what it's like to be scared when it rains? Even as a child growing up in suburban Detroit, I remember sitting on the upper steps of our basement watching sewer water backing up and wondering how high it would come. That problem was later solved by a twelve-town drain system but the frightening memories still linger.

    The National Flood Insurance Program is $23 billion in debt. Who is paying for flood insurance claims? The taxpayer, of course. We are building where we shouldn't be. We are building in floodplains, on reclaimed swamps, on the oceanfronts even though higher sea levels are being predicted and hurricanes happen frequently.

    Jeff Goodell is a journalist who has interviewed scientists, climate experts, city planners, politicians, flood victims, architects, geo-engineers, etc. to further his understanding of what the situation is and what might be done to solve the problems. For the water will come.

    "If we want to minimize the impact of sea-level rise in the next century, here's how we do it: stop burning fossil fuels and move to higher ground. We wouldn't even have to stop burning fossil fuels tomorrow--if we did it by 2050, that would be good enough. It wouldn't entirely halt sea-level rise, but it would avoid the worst of it."

    Thank you to NetGalley, the author and publisher for providing me with an arc of this important new book for an honest review.

  • Jess

    Thanks to Little, Brown and Company via NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It has not influenced my thoughts or opinions about this book.

    Throughout this book, Goodell explores geographic regions and innovative technologies to see what can be done to reduce the impact of rising water. Ultimately, there are some questions that emerge:

    - How can we depoliticize climate change and show the real and impending impact on human civilization?

    - How will governments address buy-outs

    Thanks to Little, Brown and Company via NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It has not influenced my thoughts or opinions about this book.

    Throughout this book, Goodell explores geographic regions and innovative technologies to see what can be done to reduce the impact of rising water. Ultimately, there are some questions that emerge:

    - How can we depoliticize climate change and show the real and impending impact on human civilization?

    - How will governments address buy-outs, flood damage, and relocation of peoples, towns, and cities?

    - How will governments and societies address climate refugees, whose numbers may swell far above and beyond political refugees?

    - How can we stop being so short-sighted with our thinking about investment defending communities against climate change?

    - Will the Arctic be a new battleground in the fight for fossil fuels and developmental resources?

    Overall, this is a well-researched book. I was pleased that Goodell explored not only Western (primarily American) concerns, but also those of the Marshallese and Nigerian. I did feel like the chapters dealing with Miami real estate developers and the role of nuclear and military facilities on the Eastern Seaboard to be a bit of a slog, but worth it to get to the other chapters.

  • Bandit

    It's October and in theory I should be reading something scary. Then again, this is pretty scary. Jeff Goodell, a journalist and a climate expert, creates a hauntingly vivid picture of a very wet world to come. Traveling the world, visiting coastal cities across the globe that can potentially become the next Atlantis, he talks to experts and locals to gain a well rounded perspective of the threats they are facing and the realities of their lives. This isn't a mere alarmist reporting, it's a thor

    It's October and in theory I should be reading something scary. Then again, this is pretty scary. Jeff Goodell, a journalist and a climate expert, creates a hauntingly vivid picture of a very wet world to come. Traveling the world, visiting coastal cities across the globe that can potentially become the next Atlantis, he talks to experts and locals to gain a well rounded perspective of the threats they are facing and the realities of their lives. This isn't a mere alarmist reporting, it's a thoroughly researched and compelling account of a very serious and fairly imminent danger, it doesn't just raise questions, it offers solutions or possibilities thereof by showing how it's being addressed around the world. It's very well written and reads at an almost thriller like pace (no small feat for nonfiction), depressing, of course, but it inspires thinking and certainly a conversation starter, ever so timely and then at the same time...ever so frustrating, because this is precisely the sort of thing the majority of population dismisses either due to their inability to intellectually grasp the concept or greed or a combination of both. Climate change deniers would label this book as sensationalist journalism. And those who know the score don't need further proof or convincing. So that's the frustrating angle...the message will not reach the target audience, nothing will improve, it fact recent politics have done such a tragic backslide, that alone will probably take ages to undo. It may not be too late yet, but for anyone of reasonable intelligence following the news it's difficult to stay optimistic. It may very well be aquaapocalypse after all. Why not read this smart informative account of some play by play international water action and then sit back and maybe rethink a Miami condo purchase. Thanks Netgalley.

  • David Flaugher

    It is coming sooner than you probably think.

    Riveting (mostly)!! If you can believe in your voice traveling wirelessly. If you believe that the little box over your kitchen range can HEAT things without a heating element. IF you can believe that sunlight can make electricity. IF IF IF -> you believe in science. And IF you BELIEVE in science, then you have to believe on anthropomorphic climate change. It is simply undeniable. To NOT believe is to live in a vacuum of suspended reality.

    So, after

    It is coming sooner than you probably think.

    Riveting (mostly)!! If you can believe in your voice traveling wirelessly. If you believe that the little box over your kitchen range can HEAT things without a heating element. IF you can believe that sunlight can make electricity. IF IF IF -> you believe in science. And IF you BELIEVE in science, then you have to believe on anthropomorphic climate change. It is simply undeniable. To NOT believe is to live in a vacuum of suspended reality.

    So, after you come to terms with reality, you will be astonished at just how soon massive changes to our world are to our current day. They are on our doorstep, and our politicians are holding invisible imaginary shields (paid for by big oil) and dizzily repeating, "Climate change is a myth, climate change is a myth".

    If you believe, you will insist upon change.

  • Tony

    THE WATER WILL COME. (2017). Jeff Goodell. *****.

    This is an excellent review of climate change as it is recognized by the scientific community today. It takes a good look at the data, and projects events into the future to describe likely scenarios for our world when it is faced with water levels much higher than today’s. The author is a contributing editor for “The Rolling Stone,” and the author of five previous books. He makes his points by establishing current conditions on Earth and what has

    THE WATER WILL COME. (2017). Jeff Goodell. *****.

    This is an excellent review of climate change as it is recognized by the scientific community today. It takes a good look at the data, and projects events into the future to describe likely scenarios for our world when it is faced with water levels much higher than today’s. The author is a contributing editor for “The Rolling Stone,” and the author of five previous books. He makes his points by establishing current conditions on Earth and what has happened in the recent past as a result of temperature rise. He mainly focuses on two major cities, Miami and New York City. He does include conditions in other countries to illustrate some of the steps being taken by those countries to meet the danger. It is a scary scenario that he comes up with, after weighing in the politics and economics of a variety of plans of attack against the global threat. This is a terrific review of where we are at and of some of the alternative plans out there to meet mankind’s needs. Recommended.

  • Radiantflux

    67th book for 2017.

    A disappointingly superficial account of an important topic.

    Each chapter seems to involve Goodell meeting some important person who isn't aware/doesn't care about sea-level rise, and at some point Goodell will be wading through water at some high-tide here or there (New York, Miami, Venice etc). There was way too much emphasis on Miami and not enough of a global perspective.

    If you haven't read any other book on global warming this book would be OK, but there are much better

    67th book for 2017.

    A disappointingly superficial account of an important topic.

    Each chapter seems to involve Goodell meeting some important person who isn't aware/doesn't care about sea-level rise, and at some point Goodell will be wading through water at some high-tide here or there (New York, Miami, Venice etc). There was way too much emphasis on Miami and not enough of a global perspective.

    If you haven't read any other book on global warming this book would be OK, but there are much better ones already published and cover the topic in a richer fashion.

  • William Liggett

    I just returned from a Christmas break in the South Bay part of Los Angeles where multimillion-dollar houses have been built along the strand next to the beach. I was curious why no one seems to be concerned about sea level rise. On the East Coast, and southern Florida in particular, the sea is already encroaching with every storm and high tide.

    Jeff Goodell's book, The Water Will Come, provides some answers. He describes how many parts of Florida were swamplands before they were drained and sol

    I just returned from a Christmas break in the South Bay part of Los Angeles where multimillion-dollar houses have been built along the strand next to the beach. I was curious why no one seems to be concerned about sea level rise. On the East Coast, and southern Florida in particular, the sea is already encroaching with every storm and high tide.

    Jeff Goodell's book, The Water Will Come, provides some answers. He describes how many parts of Florida were swamplands before they were drained and sold as valuable real estate. Other neighborhoods were created by dredging sand from the seafloor and pumping it onto the shore. In spite of this history all shorelines and seaside cities around the world are at significant risk due to the melting ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Goodell describes the plight of Venice, Italy and the efforts taken to postpone the ultimate fate of these places so important in human history.

    This book is nonfiction and yet describes a future that sounds dystopian. It is no longer a question of if the water will rise, but rather when and how much. Goodell describes a time he spent interviewing President Obama on his trip to Alaska to draw attention to the melting glaciers and villages threatened by sea level rise. My impression is that the message of the book is not to frighten or discourage, but to paint a realistic picture of what our world will be like if we ignore the signs and continue spewing greenhouse gases unabated.

  • Stephen Selbst

    This is a journalist's book posing as serious writing. The potential for coastal flooding caused by rapidly rising sea levels is genuine and acute.This is a superficial look at the problem, unnecessarily padded with character sketches of some of the politicians, engineers, scientists and activists involved. Their lives may be more or less interesting, but their individual stories are nearly irrelevant to the issues the book half-heartedly addresses. This is a topic worthy of a more serious and s

    This is a journalist's book posing as serious writing. The potential for coastal flooding caused by rapidly rising sea levels is genuine and acute.This is a superficial look at the problem, unnecessarily padded with character sketches of some of the politicians, engineers, scientists and activists involved. Their lives may be more or less interesting, but their individual stories are nearly irrelevant to the issues the book half-heartedly addresses. This is a topic worthy of a more serious and sophisticated analysis than this book presents. I was disappointed; it had generally good reviews and I cannot imagine why.

  • Jeff

    There's a line from an old episode of The X-Files that has always stuck with me: "respect nature, for it has no respect for you."

    This reminded me a lot of "The World Without Us" by Alan Weidman, but less prosaic, more unsettling. What we consider "natural disasters" are really just Earth's growing pains. We as human beings need to pull our heads out and face some facts. Its easy to be lulled into thinking we are somehow in control of this gigantic rock we live on, but the geography of planet Ea

    There's a line from an old episode of The X-Files that has always stuck with me: "respect nature, for it has no respect for you."

    This reminded me a lot of "The World Without Us" by Alan Weidman, but less prosaic, more unsettling. What we consider "natural disasters" are really just Earth's growing pains. We as human beings need to pull our heads out and face some facts. Its easy to be lulled into thinking we are somehow in control of this gigantic rock we live on, but the geography of planet Earth continues to evolve as it has since Day One. Nature (in this case the water which covers most of our world and the weather that dictates its moods) is a ceaseless force, ancient and singleminded. There is a certain acceptance required on our part that we really are just small beings borrowing this space for a short time, and to live accordingly, more alertly.

    Maybe not the most lighthearted way to start a new year of reading, but fascinating brain food nonetheless.

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