The Passion of Cleopatra by Anne Rice

The Passion of Cleopatra

From the iconic and bestselling author of The Mummy and The Vampire Chronicles, a mesmerizing, glamorous new tale of ancient feuds and modern passions. Ramses the Great, former pharaoh of Egypt, is reawakened by the elixir of life in Edwardian England. Now immortal with his bride-to-be, he is swept up in a fierce and deadly battle of wills and psyches against the once-grea...

Title:The Passion of Cleopatra
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The Passion of Cleopatra Reviews

  • Amanda

    When I was about fourteen or so, I discovered Anne Rice. While most Riceophiles started their journeys with

    , I happened upon the only Rice book  in the school library, which just so happened to be

    I absolute loved it, and couldn't wait for the next installment.

    Which never, ever arrived.

    This was the bane of my young life, then the prickly annoyance of my twenties, and eventually settled into a mild disgruntlement and occasional fits of "

    When I was about fourteen or so, I discovered Anne Rice. While most Riceophiles started their journeys with

    , I happened upon the only Rice book  in the school library, which just so happened to be

    I absolute loved it, and couldn't wait for the next installment.

    Which never, ever arrived.

    This was the bane of my young life, then the prickly annoyance of my twenties, and eventually settled into a mild disgruntlement and occasional fits of "but

    , Anne! You wrote seventy

    vampires novels about

    , why is there no

    sequel!?!?". Only a few weeks ago, I was complaining about this very thing to someone at work, and I worked myself up into a tizzy all over again. So you can imagine my pleasant surprise (and my subsequent muttering about "synchronicity" and "brain worms" and "tinfoil hats") when only a day or two later an

    - written by Rice in partnership with her son, Christopher - became available for review and I got hold of a copy.

    Obviously I had to review it immediately.

    .

    Except, it had been so long since I'd read the first book that I couldn't remember much about it. So I tracked down a copy and did a swift reread. For scientific accuracy. My findings can be summarized thusly:

    There are so many more interesting and well-written Anne Rice books.

    This is a bodice-ripper. Hmmm.

    The female protagonist is drip who cries all the time.

    Oh well, it's fun anyway.

    I was interested to see where the Rices would go with the story, considering both are known for lushly gothic writing (and the first book is rather more "British" and reserved in tone). I'm happy to report that this is high-quality Rice. Julie, while still a little underwritten, is at least a little more interesting and independent (and isn't weeping all the time). Less focus is spent on Ramses / Ramsey in Cavour of the much more tantalizing (if a bit mad) Cleopatra, and the mysterious immortal queen, Bektaten.

    The action - set on the cusp of what would become known as "The Great War"- sweeps from Cairo to London to Monte Carlo and the United States, and it really is a rather ripping yarn. It's definitely an Anne Rice story (with the exquisite descriptions of outfits and meals and the current emotional state of everyone in the room), but it has the feel of an old-school matinee movie from the 1930s or so. Friends, strangers, lovers and enemies alike find themselves drawn together by forces beyond their control, leading to an inevitable confrontation at the engagement party for Ramsey and his beloved Julie. It's a mark of how engaging the writing is that I was truly invested in the outcome - The Passion of Cleopatra is pretty "unputdownable".

    So, all in all a strong return for Ramses, and a potentially addict new series. Hold thumbs that book 3 arrives before my 60th birthday.

  • Gary

    what to say about this book all I can really say is anne rice has done it again penned a story that the reader gets lost in. a world full of wonder and magic fantastic 5 stars all round

  • Beth

    Slow start, with a complicated plot and many so characters to follow. It was intriguing enough to keep me invested in reading but I was thinking it just an okay read... And then right around 60% the fruition of the build-up came together and BOOM, I was completely and utterly hooked.

    I received this ARC copy of

    from Anchor. This is my honest and voluntary review.

    is set for publication November 21, 2017.

    My Rat

    Slow start, with a complicated plot and many so characters to follow. It was intriguing enough to keep me invested in reading but I was thinking it just an okay read... And then right around 60% the fruition of the build-up came together and BOOM, I was completely and utterly hooked.

    I received this ARC copy of

    from Anchor. This is my honest and voluntary review.

    is set for publication November 21, 2017.

    My Rating: 4 stars

    Written by: Anne Rice

    Paperback: 416 pages

    Publisher: Anchor

    Publication Date: November 21, 2017

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1101970324

    ISBN-13: 978-1101970324

    Genre: Fantasy, Horror, Scifi

    Amazon:

    Barnes & Noble:

    Reviewed for:

  •  ( A Bald Mage) Keith

    I'd like to thank Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group and Netgalley for allowing me to read and review this book.

    "One's own hand, one's own pen, one's own mind; these things are not enough if one is to live for all time"

    Forget Lestat, because Ramases is back in this stunningly passionate long awaited sequel to Anne Rice's The Mummy.

    Well we've been waiting for this novel for an age, ever since finishing The Mummy and reading "The Adventures of Ramses the Damned Shall Continue". Well finally the wai

    I'd like to thank Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group and Netgalley for allowing me to read and review this book.

    "One's own hand, one's own pen, one's own mind; these things are not enough if one is to live for all time"

    Forget Lestat, because Ramases is back in this stunningly passionate long awaited sequel to Anne Rice's The Mummy.

    Well we've been waiting for this novel for an age, ever since finishing The Mummy and reading "The Adventures of Ramses the Damned Shall Continue". Well finally the wait is over, Anne Rice with co writer Christopher Rice have brought us a sensual, exciting, page turner of a sequel that does not disappoint.

    Our journey begins in Jericho 3600B.C. with the introduction of Bektaten an African Queen of the great ancient civilisation of Shaktanu. Saquos, once Bektaten's aid, lover and Betrayer he's now only after one thing the pure elixir an obsession that will and has spanned centuries.

    For full review please visit my blog at;

    Thanks for reading Keith.

  • Dana Aprigliano (TheVaguelyArticulateReader)

    *I would like to thank Penguin First to Read for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review. Speaking of which, this review will be FULL OF SPOILERS for THE MUMMY, OR RAMSES THE DAMNED!*

    Even now, as I’ve finished reading Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra, I’m still so shocked I was given an ARC to read and review. As you might be able to tell from that swoony-sounding first sentence alone, I’m a fan of both Anne and Christopher Rice. I began with the Vampire Chronicles th

    *I would like to thank Penguin First to Read for providing me this book in exchange for an honest review. Speaking of which, this review will be FULL OF SPOILERS for THE MUMMY, OR RAMSES THE DAMNED!*

    Even now, as I’ve finished reading Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra, I’m still so shocked I was given an ARC to read and review. As you might be able to tell from that swoony-sounding first sentence alone, I’m a fan of both Anne and Christopher Rice. I began with the Vampire Chronicles three years ago, then proceeded to read pretty much every single book Anne Rice has published under that name (note: I HAVE NO IDEA HOW THAT HAPPENED, IT ALL WENT SO FAST), as well as two of Christopher Rice’s books as a result of recommendations. But REGARDLESS, I will review this ARC as I would any other ARC.

    I read The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned, the prequel to this book, for the first time about a month ago, so I still had it fresh in my mind upon starting this book. However, I realize that there’s a ton of people who have been waiting for this sequel for nearly thirty years. For those who fall into that category, there was some pretty comprehensive introductory material at the beginning of the novel to bring you up to speed on all the most essential information from book one. Nonetheless, I do not recommend that you pick up this book unless you’ve read The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned first; there is a good chance you will get lost.

    This book begins about two months after The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned ended. Those two months give the world enough time to realize that Julie Stratford’s eyes seem to have suddenly turned bright blue while she was in Cairo with “Reginald Ramsey”, but not enough time for the world to realize that she’s not aging naturally. Julie and Ramses are engaged, and Julie’s ex-almost-fiancée Alex is still mourning the accidental death of the mysterious woman he met and fell in love with in Cairo. Everyone’s on their way back to England so that Alex could throw an engagement party for Ramses and Julie, but Cleopatra, who Ramses rose from the dead in a momentary lapse of reason, is still out there and still murderous. These plot threads are tied with some others that result from the introduction of a group of new characters in this novel, and these plot threads were all pretty well-tied-up in multiple resolutions during an explosive ending sequence that I WILL NOT SPOIL!

    Okay, I’m going to break from that rule I said I’d follow earlier, that I’d review this ARC as I would any ARC. This book struck me as very similar to Anne Rice’s other new book Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis. That is not necessarily a good or bad thing, just… a thing. In this novel, like in Realms of Atlantis, a group of strange, new characters from a mythological, pre-history utopia are introduced to the present-day. They shake up the world that the main characters have known for thousands of years by revealing answers to questions that the main characters have always been unable to answer about their identities. These primeval characters bring their primeval, ten-thousand-years-in-the-making problems into the present-day, and our pre-established set of main characters have to help solve their problems. Oh, and there are some understandably dramatic identity crises happening accordingly. I like this format, both since it allows for a large cast of vibrant characters interacting and since it results in a lot being shown to the reader and not told.

    But I did give this book four stars. I just wasn’t able to give this book five stars, since I felt as though the plot of this book was a little flimsy. I won’t give away any spoilers, but I feel as though if the main male villain in this story could have just done one thing differently, which really would not have been all that hard, one of the biggest conflicts in this book would not have needed to happen. Thus, most, if not all, of those new characters I talked about would not have been necessary. And I got this feeling very early on in the book, too! All this didn’t necessarily invalidate my entire reading experience, but it did make the matters in this book seem a lot less pressing and urgent.

    The high point of The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned was most definitely that dinner scene in the middle of the novel, during which Alex argued with Reginald Ramsey, who he had no idea was actually an Egyptian pharaoh, about Egyptian history for pages on end. In Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra, there is a sort-of-equivalent scene in which sparks fly, and I really appreciated that scene! I recommend this book to any other die-hard Anne Rice fans like me, as well as anyone who even remotely enjoyed the first book in this series. Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra is a fun ride with a lot of flair, and you won’t regret it. Anne and Christopher Rice are a solid writing team, and I hope to read more from these two.

    Review originally posted on THE VAGUELY ARTICULATE READER BLOG, at

  • Emily

    I received an ARC of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway.

    I chose to not reread the first book before starting this one. I read and adored the first one a decade ago during my high school Anne Rice phase. This book does a pretty good job of reminding the reader of pertinent plot points and I only felt the need to take a quick look at the first one to refresh my memory.

    It took a few chapters for the story to gain steam, but once it did I devoured the book in two sittings. By the time I reached th

    I received an ARC of this book from a Goodreads Giveaway.

    I chose to not reread the first book before starting this one. I read and adored the first one a decade ago during my high school Anne Rice phase. This book does a pretty good job of reminding the reader of pertinent plot points and I only felt the need to take a quick look at the first one to refresh my memory.

    It took a few chapters for the story to gain steam, but once it did I devoured the book in two sittings. By the time I reached the second half of the book I couldn’t bring myself to put it down

    . All of the characters were interesting to read about and I enjoyed bouncing back and forth between their perspectives. I found myself eagerly awaiting the moment where they would all come together.

    While the story left me feeling satisfied, I was left wanting to know more about the characters.

    Overall, I loved this long-awaited collaborative sequel as much as I loved the first one and I encourage fans of Anne Rice’s other works to pick this lesser-known series up.

  • Kimberly

    I have read Anne Rice's books, both series, for years. Let me just say that this book is disappointing on many levels. The writing style, and writing itself is vastly different to Mrs. Rice's. It is rushed in tone. Gone are her beautiful, languid, descriptive sentences and conjured scenes. Replaced now with short vapid sentences, far too many characters, ridiculous dialogue scenes. Unfortunately, it just feels and reads differently to any other Anne Rice book.

  • Sh3lly ✨ hates the holidays - bah humbug! ✨

    Woah! I can't believe I got approved for this! I've been enjoying her "reboot" of the vampire chronicles pretty well, so looking forward to a part two from another "old" book of hers!

  • Karen

    See my full review and much more on my blog

    THE PASSION OF CLEOPATRA picks up a few months after THE MUMMY. I have to admit I didn’t re-read THE MUMMY before reading this book and I feel like maybe that was a mistake. Perhaps a re-read of both books would give me a better perspective. Honestly, I don’t think it matters because the authors have done a great job of explaining, without great detail, how we got to this point in the story. I would recommend reading the first book at

    See my full review and much more on my blog

    THE PASSION OF CLEOPATRA picks up a few months after THE MUMMY. I have to admit I didn’t re-read THE MUMMY before reading this book and I feel like maybe that was a mistake. Perhaps a re-read of both books would give me a better perspective. Honestly, I don’t think it matters because the authors have done a great job of explaining, without great detail, how we got to this point in the story. I would recommend reading the first book at some point before picking this book up though.

    Ramses is with his now immortal lover, Julie. They are to be married and their happiness in love is where the story starts. The have a little turmoil dealing with Julie’s ex-fiancé, but he actually turns out to be their one of their biggest supporters and even throws an engagment party for them. It actually ends up being a good thing for everyone. The only real problem is that Ramses has made this terrible mistake with trying to revive Cleopatra in her mummified state. Now they all have a reason to fear her wrath. It turns out she is not the only thing Ramses and Julie really need to fear.

    This story introduces us to a happier Ramses. He is still ‘Ramses the Damned’, but now he is not alone. Also, he is going by the name Reginald Ramsey and finding a good place in society. I loved to see Ramses finally content and actually living in the world and not just witnessing time passing. Well, almost content. Ramses is haunted by what he did to Cleopatra even though he does not love her anymore. Cleopatra doesn’t really show up until later in the story, but she is constantly on their minds. Then along with Cleopatra we are introduced to something much older than Ramses and someone not immortal who plays a vital role in this story.

    Cleopatra struggles with her new role in this time and the gaps in her memory. Is life worth living if we can’t remember our past? That is the question Cleopatra brings to this story. She wants everything back, but she can’t even remember what she is missing.

    I don’t want to spoil anything, so I will just leave it at that.

    Anne Rice has teamed up with her son, Christopher Rice to finally complete this story. I can’t even say that it is truly complete because, like all Anne Rice books, there could be more. I didn’t even know that Christopher Rice was a writer. If his books are all like this, you can bet I will be reading whatever he pens. This book was so in the classic Anne Rice style that I love.

    The time period that this story takes place is not modern, so it read like historical fiction. The story ends as the great WW is starting and although I felt like I was experiencing it for myself, I worried about what would happen to all these lovely characters during war time. This isn’t something I ever remember reading about in an Anne Rice book so it really took me by surprise.

    I would highly recommend this to fans of THE MUMMY. I would also recommend this series to people whom might enjoy reading about immortals that do not have to take life to live forever. I hope these two pen more books about Ramses because there were a few loose ends and so much more that I wish we would have explored. I would love to read more of Ramses adventures.

  • Douglas Meeks

    First: If you have not read book 1

    then you need to stop here and get it and make sure you are as enamored by this story as I was and still am (this is a sequel that took almost 7 years to be written)

    I am not going to talk to much about the story itself, the synopsis and other reviewers are doing that, I want to talk about the whole story that is told in 2 books that took 7-8 years or more to write. I consider this combined story a bit of a masterpiece, there was nothing to scan becaus

    First: If you have not read book 1

    then you need to stop here and get it and make sure you are as enamored by this story as I was and still am (this is a sequel that took almost 7 years to be written)

    I am not going to talk to much about the story itself, the synopsis and other reviewers are doing that, I want to talk about the whole story that is told in 2 books that took 7-8 years or more to write. I consider this combined story a bit of a masterpiece, there was nothing to scan because you were afraid you would miss something, the characters were riveting and the multiple plots converging was masterful and exceptional.

    Both books shared a similar multiple plot style merging and culminating in some event, I loved it and most authors could not have pulled it off. I am not a big Anne Rice fan and sadly these 2 books and her masterpiece

    are still the only books of hers I would tell anyone to spend their money on but these 3 are worth every penny.


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