Two Kinds of Truth by Michael Connelly

Two Kinds of Truth

Harry Bosch searches for the truth in the new thriller from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael ConnellyHarry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's 3-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the danger...

Title:Two Kinds of Truth
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Two Kinds of Truth Reviews

  • Matt

    Michael Connelly has been hard at work to bring readers another instalment in the Harry Bosch series. With Bosch having such a long existence in the crime thriller world, some permutations had to be expected with the 22nd novel. Three years away from the LAPD, Bosch has been contentedly working for the San Fernando PD as a detective. His current focus is the piles of cold cases that haunt the region. When Bosch is visited by a former partner and two other officials, he learns that a man sitting

    Michael Connelly has been hard at work to bring readers another instalment in the Harry Bosch series. With Bosch having such a long existence in the crime thriller world, some permutations had to be expected with the 22nd novel. Three years away from the LAPD, Bosch has been contentedly working for the San Fernando PD as a detective. His current focus is the piles of cold cases that haunt the region. When Bosch is visited by a former partner and two other officials, he learns that a man sitting on death row that he put away for murder three decades ago has been given another chance by the LAPD Convictions Integrity Unit (CIU). After opening an investigation when another man confessed to the crime, DNA not previously processed was found on the victim’s clothing. Additionally, there is an attempt to sandbag Bosch, citing that he went rogue and planted evidence. As Bosch tries to process this, he is called out on a fresh case, where two pharmacists have been killed at work. With the CIU investigation pushed to the back of his mind, Bosch begins exploring the dark world of drug-dealing by scrip, where plants are sent into pharmacies (sometimes willing) and having hundreds of prescriptions filled for oxy pills, only to have them released on the streets. The deeper he digs, the more complex the web Bosch discovers. While he may be a few years away from dealing with warm victims, Bosch will stop at nothing to get to the bottom of this case. Meanwhile, turning to his half-brother, Bosch engages the services of Mickey Haller to help him through the mess that is CIU and the upcoming hearing to clear the name of a death row inmate. Does Bosch have enough recollection to keep his name clear from the mud? Can Haller pull a proverbial rabbit out of a hat? How can they dismiss the video of a sealed evidence container holding clothing that was stained with DNA that did not belong to the killer? Readers are treated to a wonderful story that does not let go until the bitter end. Perfect for series fans who enjoy a little Bosch with their mystery.

    I have long been a Michael Connelly fan and this novel helps support that claim. It is a successful author who can juggle a series for as long as Connelly has kept Bosch going without allowing things to go stale. Connelly finds new angles and approaches for his protagonist to ensure that the grit for which Bosch is so well known does not dull. Pulling on a few threads from Bosch’s background or personal life, Connelly pulls the reader into the middle of the man’s life, as well as his acclamation to a smaller and less vigorous life as a cold-case detective. Bosch is surrounded by many secondary characters, some new and some long-established, all of whom complement (never compliment) Bosch on his journey through the narrative. The story is clean and the premise poignant, as oxy drugs supersaturate the market now. Connelly shows his research is strong and all-encompassing to present such a wonderful story, pulling on various parts of the underworld. I can see Bosch continuing his strong reign within the crime thriller genre, helped by the superior writing of Michael Connelly. Surely Haller fans with also enjoy what the author has done in this meshing story.

    Kudos, Mr. Connelly, for this wonderful piece. Some have commented that things are going off the rails, though I cannot see it myself. I wonder if you have ideas about meshing all your L.A. characters in a coming novel.

    Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at:

    A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge:

  • Esil

    I so rarely give 5 stars to mysteries, but Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch series is one of my very favourites and this one is absolutely top notch. Connelly has woven two great stories together, very much engaging with some pressing contemporary issues while serving up classic Bosch. In one plot string, Bosch is at risk of being discredited due to new DNA evidence in a case that he had investigated that led to a convict sitting on death row for over 30 years. In the other story, Bosch gets invol

    I so rarely give 5 stars to mysteries, but Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch series is one of my very favourites and this one is absolutely top notch. Connelly has woven two great stories together, very much engaging with some pressing contemporary issues while serving up classic Bosch. In one plot string, Bosch is at risk of being discredited due to new DNA evidence in a case that he had investigated that led to a convict sitting on death row for over 30 years. In the other story, Bosch gets involved in an investigation that delves deep into the depravity of those involved in perpetuating the opioid crisis — I expect Connelly’s depiction of addiction and the exploitation of addicts is based on sound research and it’s bone chilling. In both cases, the plots are intricate, well paced and hit the right emotional and ethical notes. This could probably be read as a standalone, but it’s a lot richer if you’re familiar with the series. Loved it! Perfect read to end the year...

  • Donna

    What is about this series that makes it so good?

    A) The no nonsense, expert writing that mines its characters deeply with so few words.

    B) The suspenseful stories.

    C) The brain teasing criminal mysteries.

    D) The search for truth and justice and the moral dilemmas that accompany the search.

    E) All of the above.

    If you picked E, correct! And this latest book has it all.

    Harry Bosch soon finds out exactly what that cryptic warning means as one of two cases he’s working on gets more com

    What is about this series that makes it so good?

    A) The no nonsense, expert writing that mines its characters deeply with so few words.

    B) The suspenseful stories.

    C) The brain teasing criminal mysteries.

    D) The search for truth and justice and the moral dilemmas that accompany the search.

    E) All of the above.

    If you picked E, correct! And this latest book has it all.

    Harry Bosch soon finds out exactly what that cryptic warning means as one of two cases he’s working on gets more complicated and dangerous than anything he’s ever been involved in before. He’s supposed to be working cold cases as a volunteer for the San Fernando Police Department, same as he has been for the past two years after retiring from the Los Angeles Police Department under less than optimal circumstances. But now, Harry finds himself in the middle of a hot case in which a father and son have been brutally murdered while tending to their family owned pharmacy in San Fernando. Harry lets others in his unit take the lead in the case while tutoring them with expert advice from the sidelines as he has his hands full with another case that has resurfaced from his past, one that could threaten not only his livelihood, but his legacy built on integrity. With much help from his half brother, defense attorney Mickey Haller, Harry goes to war, not only to keep a killer where he belongs, but to defend himself and the truth, despite evidence to the contrary. But the other case pulls him in when he learns something critical about one of the victims. And soon, he’s all over it and all the way in, way more in than he ever wanted to be.

    It’s getting harder and harder to review Connelly’s books each year when I’m running out of superlatives to praise them. So at the risk of repeating myself, I’ll simply say this is one of his best books yet featuring Harry Bosch, with a generous part in the story for his half brother, Mickey Haller. What a duo they make with their differing philosophies on work and life in general. Their interactions were definitely a highlight. Also, the intricate cases in this book did not disappoint since it’s never just about catching the bad guys. It’s about unraveling the evidence to pursue the truth wherever it may lead.

    If you’ve read any of this series, you’ll know which truth Harry believes in. And in this book, it leads him to examine some painful truths about himself when reflecting on his turbulent childhood and the mother he barely knew. It added to that ever-present melancholy tone to the series that goes beyond the jazz music Harry favors to become the soundtrack of his life. A must read.

  • Paromjit

    This is the latest and thrilling addition to the terrific Harry Bosch series set in LA and San Fernando. Harry is working as a volunteer cold case cop at SFPD trying to get to bottom of the missing, presumed dead, Esme Tavares, when he receives an upsetting visit from the recently created LAPD Conviction Integrity Unit. This consists of his old partner, Lucia Soto, Bob Tapscott and Deputy DA, Alex Kennedy. They inform him that a death row murderer, Preston Borders, is going to be freed, as new D

    This is the latest and thrilling addition to the terrific Harry Bosch series set in LA and San Fernando. Harry is working as a volunteer cold case cop at SFPD trying to get to bottom of the missing, presumed dead, Esme Tavares, when he receives an upsetting visit from the recently created LAPD Conviction Integrity Unit. This consists of his old partner, Lucia Soto, Bob Tapscott and Deputy DA, Alex Kennedy. They inform him that a death row murderer, Preston Borders, is going to be freed, as new DNA evidence points to sexual predator and rapist, Lucas John Olmer, now deceased, as the killer of the woman Borders was convicted of. There are additional vibes that suggest they think Harry and his now dead partner, Frank Sheehan, were responsible for serious misconduct that resulted in this miscarriage of justice. Harry tries to get his head round these astonishing developments, he is absolutely convinced they got the right man. So what is going on?

    In the meantime, there have been two fatal shootings of a father and son, both pharmacists at the La Farmacia Familio, in San Fernando. It looks as if these were professional hits, with particular venom aimed at the son. It seems that the son might be involved in gangs which resulted in the hits. However, this turns out to be wide of the mark as Bosch and the SFPD follow up on a complaint made by the dead son about a clinic and the pharmacy's role in a pill shills scam run by the wanted Santos, and Russian criminal elements using desperate and vulnerable enslaved prescription drugs addicts. The DEA are interested in getting to Santos, and want Bosch's help to do this. Despite advice to the contrary, Bosch agrees because he wants to secure justice. At the same time, Preston Borders and his lawyer, Lance Cronyn, point the finger at Bosch as a corrupt officer who planted the evidence that convicted Borders. Bosch is going to need help, and calls on his half brother, Mickey Haller, the Lincoln Lawyer. Haller and Bosch begin to pull at the threads of the evidence that appears to clear Preston Borders and begin to unravel a sinister conspiracy for which Bosch is merely the fall guy. However, the allegations cross over into Bosch's role in the pill shill scam, putting him in deadly danger.

    By now, Bosch is a battered survivor who still retains his ideals and his determination to secure justice. In this novel, I really felt Harry's tiredness and recognition that justice can, at times, only be short term, as it may possible to get the perpetrators, but not those who control the drug scams and make millions from it; and that shutting down an operation is not enough, as replacement scams emerge. Harry uses his earthquake fund, putting his personal faith and humanity into helping a woman addict who has faced the worst of times. It is a salutory experience for Bosch to observe how those who know him, including his nearest and dearest, still entertain a glimmer of suspicion about his guilt and corruption. However, if there is one thing that Harry has and that is ability to forgive, whilst on occasion using it to call in favours. As ever, this is brilliant crime fiction from an expert. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.

  • Susanne Strong

    In “Two Kinds of Truth,” Harry Bosch is back.  Still volunteering for the SFPD, working cold cases and mentoring the younger detectives in the department, when something goes awry.  Bosch’s integrity as a detective is called into question.  The newly created Conviction Integrity Unit (which includes his former partner, Lucia Soto) investigates an old case of his. Turns out a man that Bosch put on Death Row, claims he’s innocent. His attorney gives two reasons: 1

    In “Two Kinds of Truth,” Harry Bosch is back.  Still volunteering for the SFPD, working cold cases and mentoring the younger detectives in the department, when something goes awry.  Bosch’s integrity as a detective is called into question.  The newly created Conviction Integrity Unit (which includes his former partner, Lucia Soto) investigates an old case of his. Turns out a man that Bosch put on Death Row, claims he’s innocent. His attorney gives two reasons: 1) evidence was planted at the scene by Bosch and his former deceased partner Frankie Sheehan; and 2) new DNA evidence has come to light that proves that the wrong guy was accused of the crime. Enough said, right? Bosch, of course disagrees - he knows he put the right guy in jail. After all, Bosch works his cases to the bone. Now of course, he has to prove that he put the right guy behind bars because his reputation is the only thing that matters to him, aside from his daughter, of course.

    In the midst of this, Bosch and his team have a real case to work. A double murder. And the Cap looks to him to train the team on how to handle it. Two Pharmacists were popped on the job. Turns out the place was a Pill-Mill. Unfortunately, for Bosch, things get more dangerous for him than anyone else involved.

    Bosch, however will do whatever it takes to catch the bad guys and preserve his reputation at the same time, as being a detective is all he knows and is all that he wants to do.

    Published on Goodreads, Amazon, Twitter and Instagram on 12.2.17.

  • Gary

    I can't get enough of Michael Connelly and was excited by the prospect of reading his latest novel. This is the 20th book in the highly successful Harry Bosch series and even after reading all the previous books the series still feels fresh with no sign of the high standard dropping.

    Michael Connelly is my favourite author, he rarely disappoints and this is no exception. Great characters, well paced plot and exceptional writing.

    Now in his sixties Harry Bosch is working cold cases for the San Fern

    I can't get enough of Michael Connelly and was excited by the prospect of reading his latest novel. This is the 20th book in the highly successful Harry Bosch series and even after reading all the previous books the series still feels fresh with no sign of the high standard dropping.

    Michael Connelly is my favourite author, he rarely disappoints and this is no exception. Great characters, well paced plot and exceptional writing.

    Now in his sixties Harry Bosch is working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Investigations lead Bosch to a dangerous world of prescription drug abuse. At the same time an old case from when Bosch was LAPD resurfaces when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him, and seems to have new evidence to prove it. His former colleagues are no longer on good terms with Bosch and he needs to fight to protect his reputation. He fights to clear his name and keep the imprisoned killer where he belongs. These are two unrelated case and Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth, the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.

    I would like to thank Orion Publishing group and Net Galley for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  • Barbara

    Detective Harry Bosch worked for the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) for more than three decades before he retired. Not happy being a 'man of leisure' Harry took a volunteer job with the tiny San Fernando Police Department (SFPD), looking into cold cases. Harry also agreed to train the SFPD's three young detectives, playfully nicknamed Huey, Duey, and Louie.

    In his capacity as a mentor Harry accompanies Detective Bella Lourdes (probably Louie) to the scene of a double homicide. Two

    Detective Harry Bosch worked for the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) for more than three decades before he retired. Not happy being a 'man of leisure' Harry took a volunteer job with the tiny San Fernando Police Department (SFPD), looking into cold cases. Harry also agreed to train the SFPD's three young detectives, playfully nicknamed Huey, Duey, and Louie.

    In his capacity as a mentor Harry accompanies Detective Bella Lourdes (probably Louie) to the scene of a double homicide. Two druggists - a father and son - were shot in their pharmacy. It turns out the drug store was part of a 'pill mill' operation - a gangster-run enterprise in which prescriptions for pain killers from phony clinics are filled by pharmacies that turn a blind eye. The shooting was meant to look like a robbery gone wrong, but evidence points to deliberate cold-blooded murder.....and Lourdes takes lead on the case.

    Wanting to catch the 'pill-mill' gang leader, the DEA decides to send in an undercover cop who'll pretend to be an addict needing pain meds - and Harry gets picked for the job. Harry pretends to be a smelly bum with a knee injury, but infiltrating the drug ring turns out to be SUPER dangerous.

    Meanwhile, Harry is also involved with another investigation. Thirty years ago Harry helped put a man named Preston Borders on death row for a vicious rape and murder. Now, new DNA evidence points to a different perp - a serial rapist who recently died in prison. Even worse, Harry is being accused of planting evidence during the original inquiry. As a result, the district attorney is looking to vacate Borders' conviction, and a court hearing is scheduled.

    Harry is sure the 'new DNA' was planted and that he's being framed - especially since Harry KNOWS he did nothing wrong. Unfortunately, the DA - and some detectives in the LAPD - seem to think Harry is a dirty cop. (This is par for the course in these books. Harry's usually on the outs with one or more LAPD honchos.)

    Luckily Harry's half-brother is attorney Mickey Haller - who's probably the smartest, craftiest lawyer in Los Angeles. Harry and Mickey - along with Mickey's investigator Cisco - dig up some useful information to use against Borders and his attorneys.....and that's all I'll say about that. (I invariably picture Mickey Haller as a smooth-talking Matthew McConaughey, who played Haller in the film "The Lincoln Lawyer. LOL)

    In this book Harry shows a little of his softer side. He's very solicitous toward his college-age daughter Maddie and demonstrates sympathy for a drug addict, whom he tries to help.....though he knows it might be a losing proposition.

    I always enjoy Michael Connelly's books, which provide a fascinating peek at crime and criminal investigation around Los Angeles. In "Two Kinds of Truth", though, Harry seems to slide through the book a tad too easily. Harry and/or Mickey just happen to have exactly the right contact; or unearth exactly the right piece(s) of evidence; or carry exactly the correct unconventional (or jury-rigged) weapon; and so on. This occurs again and again and again, to the point where it stretched credibility (for me).

    Still, I liked the book and highly recommend it to mystery fans.

    Though the novel is the 29th in the series, it can be read as a standalone.

    You can follow my reviews at

  • Perry

    Another homerun Harry Bosch novel. I don't call this a "guilty pleasure," as some literati might imagine it to be.

    Michael Connelly is the premier writer of literary police procedurals. He's gotten much better over time. The result is today's most interesting, flawed and deeply conflicted police character involved in fast-paced and cerebral crime detecting.

    In

    , the two separate conflicts/crimes involve trafficking and slavery of the elderly and disabled for opioid gathering an

    Another homerun Harry Bosch novel. I don't call this a "guilty pleasure," as some literati might imagine it to be.

    Michael Connelly is the premier writer of literary police procedurals. He's gotten much better over time. The result is today's most interesting, flawed and deeply conflicted police character involved in fast-paced and cerebral crime detecting.

    In

    , the two separate conflicts/crimes involve trafficking and slavery of the elderly and disabled for opioid gathering and distribution and the possible tampering of sealed evidence of rape that could let a rapist go free.

    Another recommendation if you have the slightest interest in criminal procedurals or police thrillers.

  • Andrew Smith

    Having read Michael Connelly’s books for years, I’ve recently started watching the Bosch television series, developed by Amazon. In fact, on a long flight recently I watched 8 episodes of series 2 back to back! I think (though such is the nature of things many will disagree) they’ve got it spot on using Titus Welliver in the lead role. He seems to me to have precisely the right body language and attitude for the part and his verbal delivery feels like it jumps right out of the the pages of the b

    Having read Michael Connelly’s books for years, I’ve recently started watching the Bosch television series, developed by Amazon. In fact, on a long flight recently I watched 8 episodes of series 2 back to back! I think (though such is the nature of things many will disagree) they’ve got it spot on using Titus Welliver in the lead role. He seems to me to have precisely the right body language and attitude for the part and his verbal delivery feels like it jumps right out of the the pages of the books. I’m now not only addicted to the books but to the television series too.

    Having recently read, and very much enjoyed, Connelly’s recent book featuring a new character -

    – I was beginning to think that Harry Bosch and his crew might have been finally put out to grass. I needn’t have worried: not only is Harry back but he’s joined Mickey Haller (his lawyer half bother and star of

    and other books) and also Jerry Edgar, his former LAPD partner – a man who hasn’t featured in the series for about five years. Now is it me being cynical or might this be linked to the fact that not only does Welliver read the audio version I listened to (and he does an excellent job!) but it’s Edgar who partners Bosch in all episodes of the television series produced to date. Whatever the rationale, it’s good to see him back, albeit in a cameo role.

    The cast also provides the opportunity for Connelly to include dual plot lines:

    1. Harry, working these days for the San Fernando PD as a volunteer detective, is charged with investigating the murder of a father and son who were shot whilst working in the family pharmacy. It turns out that Edgar is working for a city agency Bosch needs to liaise with.

    2. Harry is accused of planting evidence in a previous murder case. This accusation not only threatens Bosch’s reputation but also his financial security, given the fact that should the guilty verdict be overturned the accused would have the opportunity to sue the police department and Bosch might be personally liable. Time for a call to Haller.

    Needless to say, both elements are flawlessly integrated, feeding off each other as they play out. The pacing is brilliantly handled – not once did I think a scene was over-played or undersold – and, for me, it all ended far too quickly. I loved it. The master is back and the ending certainly held the promise of at least one more Bosch book to come.

  • Berit☀️✨

    Michael Connelly is definitely an exceptional author, and one of my all-time favorites! To have the ability to write such a long series with every book being as good if not better than the last, is very rare....

    The characters in this series are so extremely well developed, I really feel as though I have a personal relationship with Harry.... end it is so nice to get to spend some time with him at least once a year...

    Michael Connelly is definitely an exceptional author, and one of my all-time favorites! To have the ability to write such a long series with every book being as good if not better than the last, is very rare....

    The characters in this series are so extremely well developed, I really feel as though I have a personal relationship with Harry.... end it is so nice to get to spend some time with him at least once a year....and it is even better when his half brother Mickey joins him.... The relationship between these two is so complex and has been so realistically developed over the course of the series.... on the surface they appear so different, but I think deep down they are more alike than either of them realize....

    The cases in this book were very interesting and very well plotted.... A murder of a father and son in a pharmacy that causes Harry to go undercover (not going to lie I was a little worried about him).... along with an old case being re-opened with accusations of Harry planting evidence, and his brother defending him magnificently.... I do really love those court scenes with Mickey.... I do also want to mention that all the secondary characters are as well developed, and it is always fun when they make an appearance....

    Can’t wait for the next book in this fabulous series! I hope Harry will be working those cases into his 80s!


Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.