Two Kinds of Truth by Michael Connelly

Two Kinds of Truth

Harry Bosch searches for the truth in the new thriller from #1 NYT bestselling author Michael ConnellyHarry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's 3-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the danger...

Title:Two Kinds of Truth
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Edition Language:English

Two Kinds of Truth Reviews

  • Matt

    Michael Connelly has been hard at work to bring readers another instalment in the Harry Bosch series. With Bosch having such a long existence in the crime thriller world, some permutations had to be expected with the 22nd novel. Three years away from the LAPD, Bosch has been contentedly working for the San Fernando PD as a detective. His current focus is the piles of cold cases that haunt the region. When Bosch is visited by a former partner and two other officials, he learns that a man sitting

    Michael Connelly has been hard at work to bring readers another instalment in the Harry Bosch series. With Bosch having such a long existence in the crime thriller world, some permutations had to be expected with the 22nd novel. Three years away from the LAPD, Bosch has been contentedly working for the San Fernando PD as a detective. His current focus is the piles of cold cases that haunt the region. When Bosch is visited by a former partner and two other officials, he learns that a man sitting on death row that he put away for murder three decades ago has been given another chance by the LAPD Convictions Integrity Unit (CIU). After opening an investigation when another man confessed to the crime, DNA not previously processed was found on the victim’s clothing. Additionally, there is an attempt to sandbag Bosch, citing that he went rogue and planted evidence. As Bosch tries to process this, he is called out on a fresh case, where two pharmacists have been killed at work. With the CIU investigation pushed to the back of his mind, Bosch begins exploring the dark world of drug-dealing by scrip, where plants are sent into pharmacies (sometimes willing) and having hundreds of prescriptions filled for oxy pills, only to have them released on the streets. The deeper he digs, the more complex the web Bosch discovers. While he may be a few years away from dealing with warm victims, Bosch will stop at nothing to get to the bottom of this case. Meanwhile, turning to his half-brother, Bosch engages the services of Mickey Haller to help him through the mess that is CIU and the upcoming hearing to clear the name of a death row inmate. Does Bosch have enough recollection to keep his name clear from the mud? Can Haller pull a proverbial rabbit out of a hat? How can they dismiss the video of a sealed evidence container holding clothing that was stained with DNA that did not belong to the killer? Readers are treated to a wonderful story that does not let go until the bitter end. Perfect for series fans who enjoy a little Bosch with their mystery.

    I have long been a Michael Connelly fan and this novel helps support that claim. It is a successful author who can juggle a series for as long as Connelly has kept Bosch going without allowing things to go stale. Connelly finds new angles and approaches for his protagonist to ensure that the grit for which Bosch is so well known does not dull. Pulling on a few threads from Bosch’s background or personal life, Connelly pulls the reader into the middle of the man’s life, as well as his acclamation to a smaller and less vigorous life as a cold-case detective. Bosch is surrounded by many secondary characters, some new and some long-established, all of whom complement (never compliment) Bosch on his journey through the narrative. The story is clean and the premise poignant, as oxy drugs supersaturate the market now. Connelly shows his research is strong and all-encompassing to present such a wonderful story, pulling on various parts of the underworld. I can see Bosch continuing his strong reign within the crime thriller genre, helped by the superior writing of Michael Connelly. Surely Haller fans with also enjoy what the author has done in this meshing story.

    Kudos, Mr. Connelly, for this wonderful piece. Some have commented that things are going off the rails, though I cannot see it myself. I wonder if you have ideas about meshing all your L.A. characters in a coming novel.

    Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at:

    A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge:

  • Paromjit

    This is the latest and thrilling addition to the terrific Harry Bosch series set in LA and San Fernando. Harry is working as a volunteer cold case cop at SFPD trying to get to bottom of the missing, presumed dead, Esme Tavares, when he receives an upsetting visit from the recently created LAPD Conviction Integrity Unit. This consists of his old partner, Lucia Soto, Bob Tapscott and Deputy DA, Alex Kennedy. They inform him that a death row murderer, Preston Borders, is going to be freed, as new D

    This is the latest and thrilling addition to the terrific Harry Bosch series set in LA and San Fernando. Harry is working as a volunteer cold case cop at SFPD trying to get to bottom of the missing, presumed dead, Esme Tavares, when he receives an upsetting visit from the recently created LAPD Conviction Integrity Unit. This consists of his old partner, Lucia Soto, Bob Tapscott and Deputy DA, Alex Kennedy. They inform him that a death row murderer, Preston Borders, is going to be freed, as new DNA evidence points to sexual predator and rapist, Lucas John Olmer, now deceased, as the killer of the woman Borders was convicted of. There are additional vibes that suggest they think Harry and his now dead partner, Frank Sheehan, were responsible for serious misconduct that resulted in this miscarriage of justice. Harry tries to get his head round these astonishing developments, he is absolutely convinced they got the right man. So what is going on?

    In the meantime, there have been two fatal shootings of a father and son, both pharmacists at the La Farmacia Familio, in San Fernando. It looks as if these were professional hits, with particular venom aimed at the son. It seems that the son might be involved in gangs which resulted in the hits. However, this turns out to be wide of the mark as Bosch and the SFPD follow up on a complaint made by the dead son about a clinic and the pharmacy's role in a pill shills scam run by the wanted Santos, and Russian criminal elements using desperate and vulnerable enslaved prescription drugs addicts. The DEA are interested in getting to Santos, and want Bosch's help to do this. Despite advice to the contrary, Bosch agrees because he wants to secure justice. At the same time, Preston Borders and his lawyer, Lance Cronyn, point the finger at Bosch as a corrupt officer who planted the evidence that convicted Borders. Bosch is going to need help, and calls on his half brother, Mickey Haller, the Lincoln Lawyer. Haller and Bosch begin to pull at the threads of the evidence that appears to clear Preston Borders and begin to unravel a sinister conspiracy for which Bosch is merely the fall guy. However, the allegations cross over into Bosch's role in the pill shill scam, putting him in deadly danger.

    By now, Bosch is a battered survivor who still retains his ideals and his determination to secure justice. In this novel, I really felt Harry's tiredness and recognition that justice can, at times, only be short term, as it may possible to get the perpetrators, but not those who control the drug scams and make millions from it; and that shutting down an operation is not enough, as replacement scams emerge. Harry uses his earthquake fund, putting his personal faith and humanity into helping a woman addict who has faced the worst of times. It is a salutory experience for Bosch to observe how those who know him, including his nearest and dearest, still entertain a glimmer of suspicion about his guilt and corruption. However, if there is one thing that Harry has and that is ability to forgive, whilst on occasion using it to call in favours. As ever, this is brilliant crime fiction from an expert. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.

  • Gary

    I can't get enough of Michael Connelly and was excited by the prospect of reading his latest novel. This is the 20th book in the highly successful Harry Bosch series and even after reading all the previous books the series still feels fresh with no sign of the high standard dropping.

    Michael Connelly is my favourite author, he rarely disappoints and this is no exception. Great characters, well paced plot and exceptional writing.

    Now in his sixties Harry Bosch is working cold cases for the San Fern

    I can't get enough of Michael Connelly and was excited by the prospect of reading his latest novel. This is the 20th book in the highly successful Harry Bosch series and even after reading all the previous books the series still feels fresh with no sign of the high standard dropping.

    Michael Connelly is my favourite author, he rarely disappoints and this is no exception. Great characters, well paced plot and exceptional writing.

    Now in his sixties Harry Bosch is working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Investigations lead Bosch to a dangerous world of prescription drug abuse. At the same time an old case from when Bosch was LAPD resurfaces when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him, and seems to have new evidence to prove it. His former colleagues are no longer on good terms with Bosch and he needs to fight to protect his reputation. He fights to clear his name and keep the imprisoned killer where he belongs. These are two unrelated case and Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth, the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.

    I would like to thank Orion Publishing group and Net Galley for supplying a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  • Trev Twinem

    There are very few events in my reading history that beat the thrill of delving into a new Michael Connelly/Harry Bosch novel. Harry may well be into his mid 60's now but he still has that hunger, that old coyote weariness about him, that first made him a grade one detective some 30 years ago. He's now older, definitely wiser his skills very much in demand by an undermanned LAPD.

     

    At the start of "Two Kinds of Truth" Harry is doing what he does best, searching through cold case files in a "drunk

    There are very few events in my reading history that beat the thrill of delving into a new Michael Connelly/Harry Bosch novel. Harry may well be into his mid 60's now but he still has that hunger, that old coyote weariness about him, that first made him a grade one detective some 30 years ago. He's now older, definitely wiser his skills very much in demand by an undermanned LAPD.

     

    At the start of "Two Kinds of Truth" Harry is doing what he does best, searching through cold case files in a "drunk tank" somewhere in San Fernando. His suspicions are aroused when detectives arrive to confront him about an investigation many years old. With the advance in forensic medicine the investigation that led to the conviction of Preston Borders, in the trial of Danielle Skyler, is now in danger of collapse. This follows the discovery of semen, belonging to a rapist Lucas John Olmer, since deseased, on some of the victims clothing. So the reality is that Borders could be freed and a wrongful arrest case brought against Harry, the ramifications of this are immense as Bosch's 30 year workload could now be open to scrutiny.  Our hero is furious but has little time to dwell on his feelings and the rights or wrongs of an old case, as the Los Angeles County once again needs his skill when a double murder occurs at a downtown pharmacy "La Farmacia Familia". In spectacular fashion he arrives, he is a happy man once again as he is now one of the lead detectives on a "live" case. The author so vividly portrays the innermost thoughts and workings of this great detective, and has me the reader cheering when once again Harry is back!! I realize that not only will Bosch solve this case but he will be accompanied by you and me dear reader riding as shotgun, and that is something we cannot miss!

     

    In the background the historic cold case proceeds and meanwhile Bosch's present assignment sees him becoming involved in the processing and handling of illegal prescriptions involving large quantities of drugs. In the course of this operation we once again meet Harry's old partner Jerry Edgar and it is wonderful to witness the "sparring" that still exists between them. Edgar never felt that Bosch truly trusted him and he now feels a little exhilarated that he is supplying vital information to his ex partner..."Bosch asked the question, jumping at the opportunity to show some expertise to the man who had always doubted him"... Connelly has always painted Bosch as a loner and even though he got results and solved cases he was always viewed as a maverick playing by his own set of rules.

     

    The drug scam is quite simple; enlist the poor and desperate in society with a deep and entrenched drug habit. Then with the help of a bogus doctor authorize illegal  prescriptions which are "cashed" in at the Farmacia. Bosch estimates that this is an industry worth more than thirteen million per year. To infiltrate this operation our hero has elected to go undercover, something new in a Connelly novel and adding an extra lair of anticipation and excitement! By going undercover Bosch puts himself in grave danger and all his colleagues and friends begin calling and leaving messages on his cell phone. I have a gripe with Bosch and his two sided standards. He loves dearly his daughter Maddie who is now a student and he implores her to be careful especially at night when she collects her car from a dismal concrete car park adjacent to her college. Yet here he is a 68 year old man about to board a small plane in the company of two Russian thugs...and he notices on takeoff that the back door is wedged open.....and they are about to fly over the sea! He is in mortal danger, what will I the reader do if the unthinkable happens? and more importantly what will young Maddie feel that the one stable person in her life her father who she loves dearly...is no more??..."His life and his world had once again clobbered his daughter. If he vowed to make those who did this pay, didn't that include himself?"....."There was no one in the world Bosch trusted more than his daughter. He told her everything, more detail than he had even told the collective in the mobile command post. He felt the details would mean more to her, and at the same time, he knew he was telling her about the dark side of the world. It was a place she had to know about, he believed no matter where she went with her life.".....

     

    I love Michael Connelly. I love the way he has brought the life of H Bosch into my home over many years. His stories are to me about life, love, relationships, the good and bad that happens, and the evil that is prevalent all around us, the choices that we make, the decisions we take and the consequences we must reap. I love the frailties on display through Harry and the bond that exists between him and his daughter the wonderful Maddie and I fear for Harry, I worry what will happen to her if ever the unthinkable were to occur to her father...."People lie, the president lies, corporations lie and cheat.....The world is ugly and not many people are willing to stand up to it anymore"...

     

    So the two story threads are brought to a very fitting conclusion amidst  a highly charged courtroom drama involving Bosch's colourful half brother, Los Angeles based attorney Mickey Haller. Yet amongst all this elation Harry is a restless soul, a man who never seems at ease with himself, a nonconformist with a really big heart. I admire the guy, I applaud the way he unearthed $10,000 from his "end of the world emergency fund" to save the drug soul of Elizabeth Clayton, a dope addict he whose life went out of control when her daughter Daisy was killed. Connelly's stories about a Los Angeles detective are as fresh today as when the first book was published some 25 years ago. Harry Bosch may well be in the autumn of his life but he but he still retains magnetism and human qualities that we all recognise. I look forward to his next outing with great anticipation and would like to thank Orion and the good people of netgalley for a gratis copy in return for an honest review and that is what I have written.

     

  • Brenda

    This is Harry Bosch book number 22. What could I possibly say about Harry that hasn’t been said before? It’s a fine addition to the series, and I enjoyed it. I did have a sense of melancholy during the end of the book, and I think that’s because Harry wasn’t satisfied with the conclusions of his cases. He was also thinking about mothers, his own and two that were involved in his cases, and how they differed. That added to the melancholy.

  • Kathi Defranc

    Harry Bosch is back, leading us down a thrilling path with some cold cases but also a new one, in which he proves that old dogs can learn new tricks when he works with the DEA as a murder branches in several directions! He is retired from the LAPD but volunteers in the San Fernando police dept,a small force with little experience. Bosch is still hard-hitting, take no prisoners with his approach to the law,and finds himself in hot water over a 30 year old case in which the criminal is on death ro

    Harry Bosch is back, leading us down a thrilling path with some cold cases but also a new one, in which he proves that old dogs can learn new tricks when he works with the DEA as a murder branches in several directions! He is retired from the LAPD but volunteers in the San Fernando police dept,a small force with little experience. Bosch is still hard-hitting, take no prisoners with his approach to the law,and finds himself in hot water over a 30 year old case in which the criminal is on death row. It is very bad when your work on a case is in question,but to hint that the detective,Bosch, planted evidence! At the same time the criminal throws his old lawyer under the bus by stating that he was told to lie.

    Say what you want, but to ruin the reputation of a highly decorated and well loved detective is not sitting well with Bosch. His half brother,Micky Haller, an attorney, is called to assist with this case. But soon both cases wind with each other, and Bosch is doing things he has never done trying to find the truth. This is the thrilling, suspenseful ride we have come to know and love in stories by Michael Connelly. Bosch is getting older, and incorporates his age and knowledge into the search for justice.

    I did receive an ARC of this book from the author, giving my honest thoughts in this review. I suggest any lover of crime fiction, police procedural and intense suspense grab a copy of this book, you will be breathless until the end...

  • Bill Lynas

    Harry Bosch is getting older (& grumpier!) in Michael Connelly's latest police procedural. This time Harry investigates two cases, one involving his half brother & lawyer Micky Haller & one has Harry investigating a double murder & taking on a role a little different to his usual one. In this new role Connelly creates some very tense moments & these chapters are by far the best in the book.

    Despite plenty going on the ingredients are better than the overall result. It's a good

    Harry Bosch is getting older (& grumpier!) in Michael Connelly's latest police procedural. This time Harry investigates two cases, one involving his half brother & lawyer Micky Haller & one has Harry investigating a double murder & taking on a role a little different to his usual one. In this new role Connelly creates some very tense moments & these chapters are by far the best in the book.

    Despite plenty going on the ingredients are better than the overall result. It's a good read, but (like Connelly's previous novel The Late Show) it's not a great one. After so many novels it's not surprising that the author is running out of ideas. Is it really time for the legendary Harry Bosch to call it a day ?

  • Andrew Smith

    Having read Michael Connelly’s books for years, I’ve recently started watching the Bosch television series, developed by Amazon. In fact, on a long flight recently I watched 8 episodes of series 2 back to back! I think (though such is the nature of things many will disagree) they’ve got it spot on using Titus Welliver in the lead role. He seems to me to have precisely the right body language and attitude for the part and his verbal delivery feels like it jumps right out of the the pages of the b

    Having read Michael Connelly’s books for years, I’ve recently started watching the Bosch television series, developed by Amazon. In fact, on a long flight recently I watched 8 episodes of series 2 back to back! I think (though such is the nature of things many will disagree) they’ve got it spot on using Titus Welliver in the lead role. He seems to me to have precisely the right body language and attitude for the part and his verbal delivery feels like it jumps right out of the the pages of the books. I’m now not only addicted to the books but to the television series too.

    Having recently read, and very much enjoyed, Connelly’s recent book featuring a new character -

    – I was beginning to think that Harry Bosch and his crew might have been finally put out to grass. I needn’t have worried: not only is Harry back but he’s joined Mickey Haller (his lawyer half bother and star of

    and other books) and also Jerry Edgar, his former LAPD partner – a man who hasn’t featured in the series for about five years. Now is it me being cynical or might this be linked to the fact that not only does Welliver read the audio version I listened to (and he does an excellent job!) but it’s Edgar who partners Bosch in all episodes of the television series produced to date. Whatever the rationale, it’s good to see him back, albeit in a cameo role.

    The cast also provides the opportunity for Connelly to include dual plot lines:

    1. Harry, working these days for the San Fernando PD as a volunteer detective, is charged with investigating the murder of a father and son who were shot whilst working in the family pharmacy. It turns out that Edgar is working for a city agency Bosch needs to liaise with.

    2. Harry is accused of planting evidence in a previous murder case. This accusation not only threatens Bosch’s reputation but also his financial security, given the fact that should the guilty verdict be overturned the accused would have the opportunity to sue the police department and Bosch might be personally liable. Time for a call to Haller.

    Needless to say, both elements are flawlessly integrated, feeding off each other as they play out. The pacing is brilliantly handled – not once did I think a scene was over-played or undersold – and, for me, it all ended far too quickly. I loved it. The master is back and the ending certainly held the promise of at least one more Bosch book to come.

  • L.A. Starks

    Harry Bosch fans, rejoice! Two Kinds of Truth is another installment in Connelly's well-written series, with Harry putting himself at risk to uncover a drug dealer, then recovering his investigative reputation on a long-ago murder with the (watch the cool subplot reverse at the end) help of his half-brother. As always, Harry is also trying to save the forgotten abused dreamers and victims of Hollywood--scenarios that are all too real given recent news about Harvey Weinstein and others.

    There is a

    Harry Bosch fans, rejoice! Two Kinds of Truth is another installment in Connelly's well-written series, with Harry putting himself at risk to uncover a drug dealer, then recovering his investigative reputation on a long-ago murder with the (watch the cool subplot reverse at the end) help of his half-brother. As always, Harry is also trying to save the forgotten abused dreamers and victims of Hollywood--scenarios that are all too real given recent news about Harvey Weinstein and others.

    There is a bit of general chat about politics which takes away from the book. Not much, but the return to the plot and subplots is a relief after these detours.

    Connelly's Bosch series triumphs because Harry is so humane--he is the hero (heroes doubt themselves and are effective because they feel fear)--like those we know or hope to know in real life, and to be ourselves.

  • Kristy

    Michael Connelly's iconic detective, Harry Bosch, is back again. Harry's basically a volunteer for the San Fernando police department, working cold cases for the tiny force and mentoring their three young detectives. When they are called out for a murder of a father and son at a local pharmacy, Harry assists the inexperienced team in trying to track down the killers. The case leads Harry and his detectives into the dark world of opiates--both the big money of pill mills and the sad, cold side of

    Michael Connelly's iconic detective, Harry Bosch, is back again. Harry's basically a volunteer for the San Fernando police department, working cold cases for the tiny force and mentoring their three young detectives. When they are called out for a murder of a father and son at a local pharmacy, Harry assists the inexperienced team in trying to track down the killers. The case leads Harry and his detectives into the dark world of opiates--both the big money of pill mills and the sad, cold side of addiction. Meanwhile, Harry hears from his former employer, the LAPD, when one of his thirty-year-old cases is reopened based on new evidence. Even worse, the killer is claiming Harry framed him. The case threatens Harry's most prized possession: his reputation as a cop, and he knows that no one will fight to clear his name like himself. The two unrelated cases pull at different sides of Bosch as he works to discover all different facets of the truth.

    I actually moved this book up in my rotation (something I rarely ever do!) so I could read it on a weekend trip to Chicago, and my only regret is that it meant I finished it in about 48 hours, and now it's over. Per usual,

    This one covers the timely topic of the opiate crisis, which looms fairly large in America today. It's well-researched, as always.

    Our Bosch is aging, which this book acknowledges well. We see Bosch still grappling with having left the LAPD--who can he trust, what can he do with his life now. We even get some appearances from previous characters in earlier novels. Perhaps the best thing is a fairly large role for Bosch's half brother Mickey Haller, the famed "Lincoln Lawyer." These two are still figuring out their own relationship, but it's a treat for us readers to get a glimpse of Mickey; we even get to see some of his enjoyable courtroom antics. There's even an appearance from Mickey's investigator, Cisco! (See, it's like being old friends!)

    And, of course, we can't forget the actual story, which, in usual Connelly style is excellent and tracks along flawlessly along Bosch's own journey. The opiate tale is both fascinating and depressing, while Bosch's unraveling of the backstory behind the reopened cold case will certainly keep you reading. There's never really any crazy twists or turns, but the novel moves along steadily and easily. There's both growth and angst with Bosch--I have to admit, I worry about the end of his arc, but I will still enjoy every moment I get with him until them.

    Another enjoyable one for the Bosch canon--certainly recommend!

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