In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's by Joseph Jebelli

In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's is the great global epidemic of our time, affecting millions worldwide -- there are more than 5 million people diagnosed in the US alone. And as our population ages, scientists are working against the clock to find a cure.Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli is among them. His beloved grandfather had Alzheimer's and now he's written the book he needed then -- a very h...

Title:In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's Reviews

  • Ben

    I received this book through GoodReads' "First Reads" in exchange for a review.

    Firstly, there is a very important topic for me. My great grandmother had Alzheimer's, as well as numerous others that I've gotten to know throughout my lifetime. One of the biggest things I often think about, and worry about, is the loss of my 'brain' in a working capacity, the memories, how to function, how to think, how to rationalize, philosophize, etc. Ever since seeing my great grandmother decay, visiting her tw

    I received this book through GoodReads' "First Reads" in exchange for a review.

    Firstly, there is a very important topic for me. My great grandmother had Alzheimer's, as well as numerous others that I've gotten to know throughout my lifetime. One of the biggest things I often think about, and worry about, is the loss of my 'brain' in a working capacity, the memories, how to function, how to think, how to rationalize, philosophize, etc. Ever since seeing my great grandmother decay, visiting her two-three times a week at the home with my Grammy.... it's always been one of my biggest fears and concerns.

    So this book was definitely of great interest to me, an Joseph Jebelli does an amazing job of showing both the scientific and the emotional side of things. As a relative of a patient he sympathizes greatly with those he's interviewed and those involved in the patient side of things. There is just so much to this disease, more than just the common thought of 'lost memories'. This is definitely a disease that needs to be eradicated now... like yesterday... like thirty years ago now.

    Jebelli does a good job of explaining the scientific jargon without over-explaining and dumbing down, also without exaggerating the illness, and just spelling it out exactly as it is, in all of it's various forms. The writing style is simple, easy flowing, and personable.

    A definite recommend for anyone with any kind of interest in the disease.

  • Rebecca Foster

    Debut author and neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli has a personal stake in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease: his beloved grandfather succumbed to it back in Iran in 2012. With the world’s population aging, it’s expected that by 2050 Alzheimer’s will be the second leading cause of death (after heart disease). What to do in the face of what Jebelli calls a “global and inescapable epidemic”? You might expect a book like this to be depressing, but instead it is reassuring to see how our under

    Debut author and neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli has a personal stake in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease: his beloved grandfather succumbed to it back in Iran in 2012. With the world’s population aging, it’s expected that by 2050 Alzheimer’s will be the second leading cause of death (after heart disease). What to do in the face of what Jebelli calls a “global and inescapable epidemic”? You might expect a book like this to be depressing, but instead it is reassuring to see how our understanding of dementia and the genetics of diseases has advanced in the last century and just how many research avenues are open and promising. Jebelli’s writing style is comparable to that of Siddhartha Mukherjee, Ed Yong and Atul Gawande. His prose is perhaps not quite as lively and literary as theirs, but he conveys scientific facts in a clear way the layman can understand; in addition, he balances history and research with a personal story readers can relate to.

    See my full review at

    . (See also

    on Alzheimer’s facts.)

  • Joodith

    Here's a frightening thought:

    “.....Globally, there's a new diagnosis every four seconds, and even that's a conservative estimate. In England,for example, it's thought that only 48 per cent of people with dementia receive a diagnosis. The remaining 52 percent may be people whose symptoms are mistaken for something else – like stress, the side effects of medication, normal ageing – or elderly people who live on their own.”

    I have a personal interest in reading as much as I can about dementia as my

    Here's a frightening thought:

    “.....Globally, there's a new diagnosis every four seconds, and even that's a conservative estimate. In England,for example, it's thought that only 48 per cent of people with dementia receive a diagnosis. The remaining 52 percent may be people whose symptoms are mistaken for something else – like stress, the side effects of medication, normal ageing – or elderly people who live on their own.”

    I have a personal interest in reading as much as I can about dementia as my mother is one of the 800,000+ people annually diagnosed in the UK alone. I have to accept that I, or other members of my family, may one day suffer from it.

    This is one of the most enlightening, readable and interesting books I've read on the subject; it deals more specifically with Alzheimer's which is just one form of dementia, rather than dementia as a whole. How many of us knew that there are different forms of Alzheimer's? How many of us knew there is a link between Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's, or a treatment for cancer and Alzheimer's? I certainly didn't.

    There are so many questions about this disease: could a transfusion of young blood into an elderly body have a beneficial effect? Can you catch the disease? Is there a gene responsible for it? Why do Icelanders not suffer from it? And so on, and on. The answers are as intriguing as the questions.

    I have recently completed a course in Dementia Care, simply for my own interest, and in order to help better understand, and help care for my mum To say the a person “suffers” when speaking of dementia and its various forms often sounds strange to me, as it is a disease which affects everyone around that person, who can be unaware of what's happening. It is indeed a cruel disease.

    The fact the the UK government, thanks to the Chief Medical Officer, one Sally Davies, as recently as 2014, decided not only to NOT follow certain recommendations with regard to using particular disinfectants in hospitals, but to reject out of hand requests for funding blood samples is not only irresponsible but outrageous. Apparently the government had “limited budgets for healthcare, public health and research.......”

    Joseph Jebelli, whose grandfather suffered from Alzheimer's felt compelled, from an early age, to research this dreadful disease; he writes with authority and passion making this a fascinating book with many anecdotal stories whilst being stuffed full of the science of research. My personal thanks and admiration go to the unsung heroes who dedicate their careers to solving the riddle of Alzheimer's.

    Thanks to Amazon for a complimentary copy to review

  • Paul

    When you think of diseases that kill people cancer and heart disease would most top peoples list, but with the population in the western world getting older, other illnesses are having an effect on mortality rates and people’s quality of life. One of the most significant is Alzheimer's and dementia, a cruel disease that leaves the shell of the person whilst stealing their personality, dignity and their memories. The first time that Joseph Jebelli came across this illness was when he was twelve y

    When you think of diseases that kill people cancer and heart disease would most top peoples list, but with the population in the western world getting older, other illnesses are having an effect on mortality rates and people’s quality of life. One of the most significant is Alzheimer's and dementia, a cruel disease that leaves the shell of the person whilst stealing their personality, dignity and their memories. The first time that Joseph Jebelli came across this illness was when he was twelve years old and his grandfather started doing strange things and becoming ‘indefinably peculiar’; Gone was the warm person he had known. This family tragedy became a pivotal point in his life and drove him to pursue a career in science researching the very disease that claimed his grandfather.

    Jebelli is now an established expert in the field of Alzheimer's research and in this interesting and informative book he sets about describing the background with Alois Alzheimer's discovery of the illness in 1906 all the way up to the current understanding of the science behind this distressing disease. Travelling all over the world he talks to the people at the cutting edge in laboratories about the latest avenues of research as they race to find a cure. He takes time to talk to sufferers and their families gaining a heartfelt understanding of the anguish they go through every day. It is a clear and well-written exploration of the different efforts that encompass research into Alzheimer's. There is a small amount on Sir Terry Pratchett, who was sadly one of those to get early onset Alzheimer's, or his embuggerance as he called it. He donated a fairly hefty sum of money to enable research, but more importantly, he spoke about his illness and spent time raising awareness of it. Jebelli writes about a difficult and personal subject in a way that brings clarity to the dark world that is Alzheimer's, I can highly recommend this book. 4.5 stars

  • Snoakes

    In this interesting and informative book Joseph Jebelli tells us the story of Alzheimer's. Starting with the history of the disease - how and when it was first described, he leads us through the history of its diagnosis and the discoveries of the different variants, research into genetics, prevention and potential treatments.

    Along the way he meets patients and their families, doctors and the scientists at the cutting edge of the research. Packed with information but also totally readable it's a

    In this interesting and informative book Joseph Jebelli tells us the story of Alzheimer's. Starting with the history of the disease - how and when it was first described, he leads us through the history of its diagnosis and the discoveries of the different variants, research into genetics, prevention and potential treatments.

    Along the way he meets patients and their families, doctors and the scientists at the cutting edge of the research. Packed with information but also totally readable it's a good example of a popular science book - you learn a lot along the way.

    If one thing comes across more than anything it's that Alzheimer's is a ticking time-bomb and this research is currently woefully underfunded. Hope is in sight though - most experts seem to agree there is a light at the end of a very long tunnel.

    I had a copy of this as a Goodreads giveaway.

  • Kerena

    I received a copy of 'In Pursuit of Memory' as part of a Goodreads giveaway in return for an honest review and I was not let down! The book is beautifully written. Although there is a lot of scientific knowledge and research that Jebelli has searched to the ends of the world to collect, he entwines a very personal and hopelessly sad journey of Alzheimer's within the pages of the novel.

    It was absolutely thrilling and captivating to read. It is a shame that investment into research this disease h

    I received a copy of 'In Pursuit of Memory' as part of a Goodreads giveaway in return for an honest review and I was not let down! The book is beautifully written. Although there is a lot of scientific knowledge and research that Jebelli has searched to the ends of the world to collect, he entwines a very personal and hopelessly sad journey of Alzheimer's within the pages of the novel.

    It was absolutely thrilling and captivating to read. It is a shame that investment into research this disease has barely increased.

    I found the number of paths of research being walked to find sense of this disease was vast and extremely thought-provoking. It was also fascinating to discover the variety and types of Alzheimer's from early onset to visual Alzheimer's.

    If you haven't read a scientific book before this is such as good start to ease you in but you definitely get your mind blown by the intricacy of this disease.

  • Natalie  S

    We are currently staring down the barrel of an epidemic with respect to the aging disorders Alzheimer’s and dementia. Human beings are living longer and these diseases have increased to the point where it will soon be our leading cause of death, overtaking things like cancer and heart disease. There are claims that one in three of us will develop Alzheimer’s and that one in two people will care for someone with it. These claims are confirmation that books like Joseph Jebelli’s In Pursuit of Memo

    We are currently staring down the barrel of an epidemic with respect to the aging disorders Alzheimer’s and dementia. Human beings are living longer and these diseases have increased to the point where it will soon be our leading cause of death, overtaking things like cancer and heart disease. There are claims that one in three of us will develop Alzheimer’s and that one in two people will care for someone with it. These claims are confirmation that books like Joseph Jebelli’s In Pursuit of Memory are an important part of the conversation and it’s one that should be required reading by all.

    To read the rest of this review please visit:

  • Christina Dudley

    I found this book unputdownable, and I've read plenty of Alzheimer's and brain books. Jebelli writes engagingly and with sympathy, tracing the history of the disease's discovery, its certain and possible causes, and its possible avenues toward a cure. Although it's too late for my mother-in-law, it made me want alternately want to give her a blood transfusion from a young person, hit her with a round of cancer drugs, and prepare some curry dishes for her to eat. Who cares if the human trials wer

    I found this book unputdownable, and I've read plenty of Alzheimer's and brain books. Jebelli writes engagingly and with sympathy, tracing the history of the disease's discovery, its certain and possible causes, and its possible avenues toward a cure. Although it's too late for my mother-in-law, it made me want alternately want to give her a blood transfusion from a young person, hit her with a round of cancer drugs, and prepare some curry dishes for her to eat. Who cares if the human trials were nonexistent or inconclusive at this point--could it possibly hurt? And if, by 2050, 135 million people worldwide will be sufferers, I'm all for throwing the spaghetti at the wall to see what sticks. (Not that this book isn't full of lots of good, solid science.)

    A great read, and a hopeful one, too, if you don't think too hard about the 135 million people who will require 135 million caregivers.

    Thank you to the publisher for the opportunity to read this excellent book.

  • Amy Leigh

    Fantastic book full of history on the disease and things we can hope for, like a cure. Having a grandmother who had Dementia through my late teen years I wound up babysitting her and reminding her who I was all too often. Now I have a future mother in law with it and she is very stubborn. My fiancé says I have helped them both so much but I hate witnessing what they both go through.

    This book gives you ideas for situations you may be in and an idea of progression- although everyone is different.

    Fantastic book full of history on the disease and things we can hope for, like a cure. Having a grandmother who had Dementia through my late teen years I wound up babysitting her and reminding her who I was all too often. Now I have a future mother in law with it and she is very stubborn. My fiancé says I have helped them both so much but I hate witnessing what they both go through.

    This book gives you ideas for situations you may be in and an idea of progression- although everyone is different. It also offers reasons for a cure. This disease to me is plain evil! You start grieving a loved one while they are still alive.

    Highly recommend if you are interested in the history of this disease or have a loved one with Alzheimer's.

    Won this book through Goodreads Giveaways and wanted (was not asked) to offer a fair and honest review.

  • Anne Showering

    This is a very good book. It's fairly scientific, but full of compassion and hope. A moving read, I can recommend it

Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.