Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson

Oathbringer

The eagerly awaited sequel to the #1 New York Times bestselling Words of Radiance, from an epic fantasy author Brandon Sanderson at the top of his game.In Oathbringer, the third volume of the New York Times bestselling Stormlight Archive, humanity faces a new Desolation with the return of the Voidbringers, a foe with numbers as great as their thirst for vengeance.Dalinar K...

Title:Oathbringer
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Oathbringer Reviews

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)

    5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    A full five stars to Oathbringer and nothing less. If you’ve read the two previous volumes in the Stormlight Archive, you’d probably already understand; this series is a masterful, meticulous continuation into the journey to explore the mysterious world of Roshar, and once again this third installment is revealing so much more about our characters and their roles in this epic tableau. I find myself speechless, as I often a

    5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    A full five stars to Oathbringer and nothing less. If you’ve read the two previous volumes in the Stormlight Archive, you’d probably already understand; this series is a masterful, meticulous continuation into the journey to explore the mysterious world of Roshar, and once again this third installment is revealing so much more about our characters and their roles in this epic tableau. I find myself speechless, as I often am after reading a Brandon Sanderson novel, because there’s so much to talk about and yet also so much I can’t spoil. I’m also not too articulate when my mind is blown, so trying to put into words my roiling feelings upon finishing Oathbringer will be difficult, but I’ll try my best to convey my thoughts on this work of art. That said, you should still only read this review after you’ve read the first two books (and if you haven’t yet, what are you waiting for, anyway!?) just in case.

    For readers who have made it to this point though, you’ll already know that the world is on the verge of another Desolation, a cataclysmic event that has occurred on a cyclical basis throughout the history of Roshar. The heralds of these wars, known as Voidbringers, have returned along with the other forces of Odium, a powerful being who is the manifestation of hatred itself. The focus once more returns to the main characters of this series: Dalinar Kholin, a Highprince of Alethkar who is the brother of the late King Gavilar; Kaladin, also known as the Stormblessed, who was a bridge crew slave before eventually becoming captain of the royal guard; Shallan Davar, a young Lighteyes woman and scholar-in-training, who studied under the tutelage of Princes Jasnah Kholin; and Adolin Kholin, eldest son of Dalinar and a full Shardbearer like his father, who is now betrothed to Shallan. Together, these characters must work together to hold off the end of the world, but to do that they’ll also need some outside help.

    Desperate for allies, Dalinar has set up his new base of operations at the legendary city of Urithiru after losing his own home to the invaders, attempting to reach out to the other Highprinces and rulers of other nations in the hopes of forming a united front against the forces of Odium. The enemy has now subsumed a great number of Parshendi fighters for their side through awakening of the previously docile parshmen with their summoning of the Everstorm, and the only chance the humans have now may be the mysterious fabrials known as Oathgates which, when activated, are said to be capable of transporting anyone to Urithiru.

    Problem is though, Dalinar not only has the shadow of his past working against him, most people also think he’s gotten soft in his resolve as well as in his head, especially after he expressed beliefs that could be considered heresy. So far, much of what we’ve seen of Dalinar paints him as an honorable, principled, and valiant figure, which is one of the reasons why he’s always been a favorite of mine ever since meeting him in The Way of Kings. But the story has always teased a darkness in his past, hinting at an angry, violent, and ruthless young man before the assassination of Gavilar dramatically altered his way of thinking. There was also that mysterious business with Dalinar’s wife, whom he can’t remember at all—not even her name, which comes across as white noise in his mind if someone utters it in his hearing.

    As a result, many questions have been raised about Dalinar’s history, and the good news is that Oathbringer lives up to every expectation by offering up a ton of answers. Is it any wonder that this may be my favorite volume of the Stormlight Archives yet? In between telling the events of the present, the narrative also occasionally takes us back to the past, delving into Dalinar’s younger years. Admittedly, these sections weren’t always easy to read, and not just because we got to see some of the atrocities he’s committed in his youth. It was also hard to reconcile this young man, who constantly fed off his sense of “The Thrill” by seeking violence and death, with the older and wiser Dalinar I’ve come to know. Though I hated to admit it, I even came to sympathize with some of the other leaders and their reluctance in helping Dalinar, fearing him to be a tyrant who will use the Oathgates to usurp them. Still, I suppose there was some beauty in these flashback chapters, especially when Adolin was born and we got to see Dalinar react to becoming a father, but ultimately there is a lot more pain than happiness in these past sequences, and some of the terrible and heartbreaking events covered the final few flashbacks damn near broke me.

    Of course, Oathbringer being “Dalinar’s book” notwithstanding, Sanderson also pays plenty of attention to the other characters, developing the roles of Kaladin, Shallan, Adolin, and even those of a number of important supporting figures besides, including a few I can’t name for fear of revealing too much. Shallan in particular gets a lot of love, because following the revelation that she is a Knight Radiant, she has become something of a magical powerhouse. That said, getting a hang of her Lightweaving abilities involve a lot of growing pains, and in inventing multiple identities for herself, Shallan also risks losing the essence of who she is. Much of Shallan’s storyline sees her testing the limits of her powers and learning to become comfortable in her own skin, which also ties into her growing relationship with Adolin, who is trying to come to terms with all that is expected of him as Dalinar’s son. Their romance subplot continues to fill my girlish heart with glee though, because I still can’t get over just how damn cute the two of them are together. To be honest, Kaladin was perhaps my one source of mild disappointment, and only because his character and personality has not evolved as much compared to the others. The storming bridgeboy is still as brave, loyal, and caring as ever, but his penchant to want to save everybody all the time also means that the all-consuming guilt still gets to him when he realizes he can’t. But then again, that’s why we all love Kaladin, isn't it?

    Thus far, I know I’ve only mostly talked about the characters, but mainly because I think they are the heart and soul and these books. But I would be remiss if I didn’t at least mention the incredible world-building, even if I probably sound like a broken record by now, since it’s no secret that Brandon Sanderson is a genius when it comes to this area. I am in awe of the number of new ideas that are still coming out of this series though, and the astounding amount of new knowledge I gained about the world of Roshar from reading Oathbringer. The characters go to some amazing places and see some amazing things, and we learn along with them as they discover new and important information about the Desolations, the Heralds, the Oathpact, Honorblades, spren, and so much more.

    And finally, all I have to say about the plot is that it was epic. Virtually no other word would do to describe this magnificent feat of storytelling. While I won’t pretend that every moment of this 1200+ page tome was a riveting experience, I can honestly say I was never bored. Oathbringer was long and slow to build, but in a good way, unfolding at the kind of pace that increases anticipation rather than induces tedium, and there were also plenty of surprises and shocking developments, including both triumphs and losses. The last two hundred pages or so were something else as well. Much of the book builds towards this final showdown, when all the character POVs come together in an exhilarating, climactic battle that’s sure to knock you off your feet. You’ll remember the ending to this one for sure.

    All told, Oathbringer is another stunning addition to the already impressive Stormlight Archive, and I’m in love with this series more than ever. Events are starting to come together to form a clearer picture, but of course there’s still much to come in this journey, which I’m excited to continue. If you’ve been enjoying this ride as much as I have so far, trust me when I say there is no way you will want to miss this book. Read it, I say, read it!

  • Dan

    4.5 stars.

    Finishing Oathbringer was both a satisfaction and a disappointment. Satisfying because this book was absolutely astonishing in every way that I expected it to be. Disappointing because I wanted it to be longer (even though it's almost 1300 pgs and it took me over two weeks to finish it).

    What can I really say about Oathbringer? Questions that I have waited years for answers were finally answered, all of my favorite characters were amazing as usual and Sanderson still keeps on developi

    4.5 stars.

    Finishing Oathbringer was both a satisfaction and a disappointment. Satisfying because this book was absolutely astonishing in every way that I expected it to be. Disappointing because I wanted it to be longer (even though it's almost 1300 pgs and it took me over two weeks to finish it).

    What can I really say about Oathbringer? Questions that I have waited years for answers were finally answered, all of my favorite characters were amazing as usual and Sanderson still keeps on developing a 10/10 solid epic fantasy world with intriguing and full-fledged characters in a world filled with great magic and despair.

    I just......Don't know how to really write a proper review for this without leaving out important bits and things here. All I can say is that this series is looooooooooooong and can be rough to get through at times, but it is so satisfying to read and if you have read some of Sanderson's other books in the Cosmere universe, then Oathbringer will blow your mind with how complex it is within the Cosmere and how it all relates.

    My only really critique for this book is that the overall redemption/forgiveness theme in the story could be a tad too much at times, but I see why it was necessary to bring it so much in focus for the overall arc. There are also some expectations that were not fulfilled within the plot, but those might be fulfilled within the next book(s).

    Anyhow, Oathbringer is astonishing in a mind-blowing way. Absolutely worth the wait and one of the most memorable books I have read this year.

    Thank you, Brandon Sanderson.

    BEFORE READING OATHBRINGER

    Edit: 9/12/2017: ONLY TWO MONTHS LEFT UNTIL I HAVE THIS BOOK IN MY HANDS, WHAT A JOY!!!

    I NEED THIS BOOK RIGHT NOW WHO DO I HAVE TO SACRIFICE TO GET IT IN MY HANDS?!!?!?!

  • Leah Steele

    Soo I just saw that there are going to be ten books in this series. Ten? 10?! TEN?!! So, what you're telling me is that I'm going to be in my mid 40's before I get to see the end of this story... damn

  • Eon ♒Windrunner♒

    RTC.

  • TS Chan

    ----------------------

    was easily the best book I've ever read, which naturally resulted in some pretty high expectations going into Oathbringer. As much as I've tried to smother it after waiting for over 3.5 years, I just had to accept that it was futile.

    Who am I kidding?

    Is Oathbringe

    ----------------------

    was easily the best book I've ever read, which naturally resulted in some pretty high expectations going into Oathbringer. As much as I've tried to smother it after waiting for over 3.5 years, I just had to accept that it was futile.

    Who am I kidding?

    Is Oathbringer a literary masterpiece? A classic that will stand the test of time and be remembered in the same vein as Lord of the Rings? That might stretch it a bit too far, but only time will tell. I wouldn't also call it flawless, as it is not. As far as I am concerned, however,

    The worldbuilding in this book, to put it mildly, outshines its predecessors. We finally leave the confines of The Shattered Plains to traverse the other parts of this vivid and alien world. The events from the end of Words of Radiance precipitated the need to extend the reach of the political narrative to other monarchies in Roshar. Urithiru, Kholinar and Thaylen City are all impressive and fascinating in very distinct and unique ways. I appreciate having the large full-coloured map of Roshar behind the dust jacket that came in handy when trying to understand the relative location of one country to another. The interior art is, as usual, stunning in illustrating the worldbuilding elements.

    Oathbringer is a dense book. Much to my delight, the lore and histories of Roshar, which so intrigued readers in The Way of Kings and Words of Radiance, are deeply explored. With each deftly handled exposition or revelation, one cannot help but wonder at the mind that did not merely create but also balance and manage such complexity (not only of Roshar but the Cosmere); the skill to weave that complexity into strands that teased and yet seemed almost apparent on hindsight. It is like seeing tiny unconnected parts of a massive painting, each giving you a small clue, its implications only dawning upon you once the larger picture has been revealed. Even then, I am sure that I am only seeing a fragment of a whole - one which is, more or less, complete at this stage. Or so I've been led to believe.

    After three books in, one thing that I kept marvelling at is Sanderson's naming convention in this series. Using the term Radiants to denote knights who adhere to specific Ideals and who glow with Stormlight is so fittingly epic. The names of the Ten Orders of the Knights Radiant, those of the Heralds and the Unmade, and the pivotal historical events such as the Desolations, Aharietiam and the Recreance - it all just sounds so

    in its own context. To be honest, I don't usually pay much attention to this aspect while reading (unless it's really bad or jarring), but here, it is too good not to do so.

    As for pacing and plot progression, it is close to perfection. Oathbringer felt even more like a trilogy in a single book than the previous two instalments. The narrative ebbed and flowed with a slower start followed by mini-climaxes and little lulls as the events gradually escalated to a mind-blowing, heart-stopping and breathtaking climactic ending. When the final chapters start to switch into multiple POVs, you will know that you have arrived at what has come to be known as the "Sanderson avalanche". In this book,

    For all the worldbuilding, lore and action present, this novel is sublime in balancing between a grand sweeping tale and personal character growth.

    I've watched a recording of the BYU launch party of Oathbringer, where Sanderson said that the first magic system he developed for Stormlight was that of soulcasting; an allusion to transformation, which is the theme of The Stormlight Archive. It is about the change and progression of people through their conflicts, both internal and external, and experiences. As such, the series is ultimately character-driven, despite all the fantastical elements wrapped around it.

    Most of you would know this if you follow the series and its updates closely. Oathbringer is Dalinar Kholin's book, as the previous two were Kaladin's and Shallan's respectively - from a backstory perspective. And it very much feels like Dalinar's book. With a longer history given his age relative to the two younger main characters, there are a lot more flashback chapters of Dalinar - an enlightening, powerful and highly relevant backstory to the events unfolding in the present timeline. The manner in which the story of his past is woven to lead into the climax is absolutely masterful.

    The development of the characters - both main and supporting ones - continues to be most compelling and excellent, taking the story in a direction that is not entirely expected, but still wholly satisfying. It is an understatement to say that Sanderson does not make it easy for his characters. The path towards being a full Knight Radiant demands an embodiment of the Ideals, each being more difficult than the previous. In this, we see our beloved characters going through significant internal struggles and learning acceptance, which makes a transformation more realistic and way more gratifying when it happens. More importantly is how Sanderson enabled readers to feel as if they are part of the inner turmoil and eventual evolution of these characters, instead of being a mere bystander to the events. And by staying steadfast to an existing core cast, this only further fuelled my empathy and emotional investment for them, favourites or otherwise. (Notwithstanding, I am still not a fan of Shallan; she infuriated me even more in this book, as fascinating as her chapters may be.)

    Allegorically, the story deals with both big and abstract world-spanning issues and small and personal real-life matters. I respect the effort he took to understand and then write about mental health issues, as well as his openness in dealing with discrimination and prejudice, whether it's challenging individual perception, societal norms or even religious doctrine.

    Now, I need to touch upon the prose and dialogue. Personally, I have always enjoyed Sanderson's dialogue and writing, and find him quite talented in delivering simple, direct and succinct phrases that truly make an impact, without having to go into long and rambling philosophical discourses. The in-world texts in The Stormlight Archive demonstrate that he is capable of writing in a more ‘elegant and poetic' manner, but perhaps that is just not how he wanted to tell his stories. Just as I can admire long beautiful passages of introspection and philosophy, I can also equally appreciate the simplicity of unembellished prose which distils the verbiage. Given how dense these Stormlight books are, I prefer this style of writing as it allows me a more thoroughly immersive experience. Notably, his writing skills are noticeably improving with every book he releases.

    All that said,

    I cried and laughed. I squealed and screamed. I felt my heart turning to mush. It brought out joy, tears, sorrow, pain, fear, anger, excitement, anticipation, shock, wonder and awe, so strongly that I'm sure emotionsprens surrounded me. This is also, in my opinion, the darkest book that Sanderson has ever written. There are moments, which made me think that the series is treading into the grimdark territory.

    Admittedly, I did wish for my favourite character of the series (and possibly of all-time) to have more presence in this instalment, but I accept that this might not always be the case given that the story is not going to centre around one main character (as much as it might seem to be in the past two books). There are also a few storylines which appear to be given too much of a light touch in the narrative, possibly in compromise for the momentum of the overarching story, or even perhaps to fit into future books. These are a few of the issues which, I am all too aware of, may not be entirely well-received by some existing fans.

    Oathbringer can be treated as Book 3 of 5, out of a larger 2-part series of 10 books, with the second part of The Stormlight Archive heading in a new direction. As with each volume so far, this novel is a self-contained story that concludes most satisfactorily, while teasing the reader with more questions and leaving some loose and new threads for future instalments. Even after reading over 1200 pages,

    and almost flipped back to the first page to start over again. There can be no other testament to the magnificence of Sanderson's magnum opus, where every book so far had succeeded in perpetuating such an obsession from me.

    A fair warning though – be prepared to suffer from a hangover once you have finished reading these masterpieces.

  • Bradley

    Holy c**p.

    This was amazing.

    I thought it was going to be hard to top the first two doorstoppers, but this one not only outdid the others in page-count but also in the quality of the storytelling. Every aspect of it was brilliant.

    I'm not usually one to gush on and on about epic fantasies. Most are pretty okay and I can slog through and eventually enjoy certain ones like GoT all right, but a few really manage to jump right out there and grab you with character, world-building, and overall story wit

    Holy c**p.

    This was amazing.

    I thought it was going to be hard to top the first two doorstoppers, but this one not only outdid the others in page-count but also in the quality of the storytelling. Every aspect of it was brilliant.

    I'm not usually one to gush on and on about epic fantasies. Most are pretty okay and I can slog through and eventually enjoy certain ones like GoT all right, but a few really manage to jump right out there and grab you with character, world-building, and overall story with heart, rage, heartache, and amazeballs reveals that are about as far away from the usual as you can get but still slam you with the reality and inevitability. I'm talking about Dalinar.

    I mean, sure, we get a lot of great stuff from Kaladin as he grows into his new heroic role and learns a lot of disturbing things about the Parchendi, including the fact that humanity is the invaders to this land, that we are the villains. And Shallan continues to grow as an illusionist and her love story is quite satisfying if generally on the backburner to the main action. Doesn't matter. I think I'll always love her and all her split personalities.

    But even though we think we've learned a lot of things about the ultra-honorable Dalinar and we're satisfied with the fact that he's bonded with the Stormfather himself, the reveals regarding his missing memory is kinda shocking, to say the least. I mean, it's kinda flooring. And now all the unspoken and referred-to actions of his younger self now make a lot more sense. He's an animal. All about the passion and the Thrill. The blood-rage, the thing that consumes all. How did he get here from there? Ah, that's the trick, no?

    Well, I can tell you all that it is all brilliant. :)

    But don't just think this is all character development. Indeed, most of it is occurring during really fantastic scenes of action or during inopportune times. The momentum is maintained. And then there's a whole squad of flying, storm-riding heroes. Matter-altering women, master illusionists, blade dancers, immortal assassins, gods, and my personal favorite... the cognitive realm itself.

    Oh, yes, we are treated to the homeworld of the Spren. A lot of it. And a very cool place it is. :) Nature spirits or creatures of pure thought, who cares? It's damn cool. :) And the reveals about humanity? NICE. :)

    I think this one might be my favorite. It obviously builds on the previous novels, but it has the wonderful distinction of not just gliding. It pushes and strives for a lot more and I couldn't be happier. :)

    Bravo, Sanderson! You've got a life-long fanboy here!

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    Let simply start with the book itself before I show the freaking freaking freaking awesome inside pictures and map on the dust jacket! I'm am freaking happy!

    I got the pre-order from Audible BUT I was waiting to read this beautiful book and listen at the same time. ♥

    I'm going to do a series of excerpts from each person. I'm not going to say what is going on or from what year. I want

    Let simply start with the book itself before I show the freaking freaking freaking awesome inside pictures and map on the dust jacket! I'm am freaking happy!

    I got the pre-order from Audible BUT I was waiting to read this beautiful book and listen at the same time. ♥

    I'm going to do a series of excerpts from each person. I'm not going to say what is going on or from what year. I want to keep it a little mysterious. Although, there will be some funny parts. There will probably be

    in some of the excerpts so if you haven't read the book just skip this or if you don't plan on reading the book and want to read the randomness, then be my guest. I decided to only do this for the first part of the book and the rest will be my regular review. So, lets crack on with it!

    No spoilers ahead..

    I can't believe I just finished the 3rd book and there are, what is it now... 7 more to be written?!

    I feel like I feel like I feel drained. I feel like I have come through so much. This book is by far better than the first two books, in my opinion. Oathbringer was filled with so freaking much. And yes, the first two books at 1000 + were filled too but it was just different. I felt like this book had more. I mean I would never not love the first two books and have them on my favorites list but this one just sealed the deal even more. I can't even imagine what else Brandon Sanderson can write in this world. I'm almost scared to know. Although, I don't think I will live long enough to finish the series since there are so many and what 2-3 years in between.

    I loved every single character in this book, even more than I did before. Well, not so much the evil people but they were great too.

    The back and forth stories, the past, the interludes, they were all perfect. I'm not saying that some didn't go over my head because all high/epic fantasy does that to me. I don't care. I will sort it all out some day with re-reads like I always do. =)

    Lord though, the freaking battles! I had to fight off a panic attack! My peeps fought a crazy, bloody battle!

    Brandon Sanderson, thank you for this wonderful book. Thank you for the art inside and out. Thank you for putting so much effort into this book. I don't see how you or any other author I love that writes these freaking murder weapon tomes can think up these worlds.

    and that's all I have to say. Okay, a couple more things. I know that all Stormlight fans will love this book. If you don't then you fell off the cliff. I don't know. Now, I'm going to shut-up because this is my longest review to date and Goodreads isn't going to let me write much more =)

    Happy Reading My Wonderful Stormlight friends.

    Mel ♥

    MY BLOG:

  • Simone

    WE HAVE A COVER!!!

    That's just stunning, can't wait to get my hands on it!

    ---------------

    I'm extremely excited about this book and my sister knows that, so she did a thing. A brilliant thing. She made me the book:

    ISN'T IT GORGEOUS? IT IS. IT TOTALLY IS. If the actual book looks like this, I'll be thrilled. AMAZING SISTER. AND I CAN'T WAIT FOR THIS BOOK.

  • ☽Luna☾

    *screams for eternity over this wonderfully glorious cover*

    I expect to have a heart attack after finishing this.

    Counting the days until release in November..

  • Petrik

    It’s not an exaggeration to say that my expectations regarding

    were extremely hard to contain. I had heard a lot of fantastic things about this series the first time I went through

    and

    last year, but I read through them many years after their original release dates.

    is a different experience in terms of environment and surrounding h

    It’s not an exaggeration to say that my expectations regarding

    were extremely hard to contain. I had heard a lot of fantastic things about this series the first time I went through

    and

    last year, but I read through them many years after their original release dates.

    is a different experience in terms of environment and surrounding hype; this time I’m actually in the midst of all the hype, praises, and excitement everywhere. Because of this my expectations were Skybreaking high; especially after reading one of my favorite books of all time:

    . Despite my irrational expectations, I’m gratified to say that Sanderson managed to meet my expectations because

    ended up being another masterwork installment in

    series.

    There’s always something in Sanderson’s story that resonates with me. Whether it’s a topic involving religion, oppression, camaraderie, or love, any book he writes will always feature one theme that is expressed articulately, and that is hope. In my opinion, out of every book that Sanderson has written so far,

    is the darkest in terms of tone. Yet, despite how dark the story gets, Sanderson reminds us that hope will always be there, and it is a theme that I will always appreciate. It’s refreshing, satisfying, and makes me happy to read his books. There’s always something philosophical and positive to learn and apply in our real-life situations from Sanderson’s books, and that remained true here, maybe even stronger than ever.

    The story was unpredictable, full of twists and turns and filled with tons of revelations.

    managed to build upon every foundation that was prepared since the beginning of

    , and in phenomenal ways. In this gigantic book, there are no words wasted. In fact, there is so much plot progression in

    that it makes both

    and

    –as epic and majestic as they are already—feel like a preparation for this book alone. With new antagonists who completely raise the stakes for Roshar, along with tons of powerful and memorable moments,

    is a meticulously structured book that felt like a trilogy or duology on its own.

    The amount of action sequences in this book far surpasses both of its predecessors. Sanderson is seriously at the top of his game when it comes to his action scenes here. If you have read any of Sanderson’s books, you should know by now that Sanderson always prepares a fantastic climax sequence to end his book in a memorable way; this applies for all of his books. The fanbase called it the "Sanderson Avalanche" (no idea who named this in the first place) and this time, we didn’t get just one, but two avalanches. This, in my opinion, is a very smart move. Not only it made the book felt like a duology/trilogy, it also made the pacing exceptional. Unlike

    , which featured Sanderson’s best close-quarter combat sequences to date,

    final conclusion is more of an epic war on a grand scale. Giant monsters, magical blades, magic clashing and unleashed, dark and cataclysmic situations, heart-pounding, intense, fist pumping and poignant moments, all told in magnificent shifting multi-POV narration; it was action-packed, pivotal, and

    It’s been half a year since I’ve read and reviewed any of Sanderson’s full novels. You know what made me miss his work the most?

    Sanderson always has a way of developing his characters with his narration to the point where we truly get inside their heads, even when it’s written in third person perspective. I’ve read a lot of fantasy books and there are really only a few authors who can do this wonderfully. The number of characters featured is not small by any means; this series features hundreds of characters. At the same time, it features Sanderson’s biggest cast of POV; yet these characters all remain distinct and unique in their personalities. Tons of characters—both main and side characters—receive proper and significant character developments, but the spotlight of this book undisputedly goes to Dalinar. We have seen Kaladin’s past in

    , Shallan’s in

    , and finally, it’s time for Dalinar’s. If you have started the first book, most likely you’ll know already what Dalinar past will involves. I need to remind you of this: unlike the previous two books—even though

    was meant to be Shallan’s book—Kaladin is not the main character here.

    It's truly an incredible experience to have witnessed Dalinar’s growth throughout the passage of time. Three chapters into his past and I can say that it was already better than all Shallan’s flashback chapters in

    I was completely captivated by Dalinar’s character development and history here; Sanderson truly did a superlative job in integrating Dalinar’s past into the main storyline. It was emotionally rewarding to read the culmination of all his experience in this book; making him one of my favorite characters of all time.

    If I have to choose only ONE thing that

    did better than its predecessors, it’s definitely the lore and world-building. The world-building is already masterfully done in the previous two books, but somehow, Sanderson successfully made it even better.

    and

    storylines were heavily centered on The Shattered Plain, whereas

    finally diverts its attention from that place and visits many other major cities in Roshar. It’s epic in scope and, combined with intricate maps and astounding revelations in the lore, this is once again Sanderson at the top of this game. If you’re not a fan of intricate world-building, I seriously think you’re going to have a hard time enjoying this series because that is definitely one of the main strengths of this series.

    I’ve talked about Sanderson’s prose several times now, and I don’t think I need to state how well written his books are. His prose is simple, immersive, vivid, (Oops, I did it again) but the most important thing to me is that it always feels like coming “home”. Sanderson shows us that fancy words and purple prose aren’t necessary to create a masterpiece of an epic fantasy. His writing never felt forced, it’s like all these words came to his head naturally. A sign of an amazing book is when you’re reading and never felt bored with any page.

    is in fact the biggest single installment I’ve ever read in my life, and I was completely enthralled with every moment of it. Some much smaller book could make me feel like homework but for

    , despite its staggering size, I still craved more. This is all due to the extremely well written and well-polished prose style that Sanderson employs.

    Let’s talk about the book’s value. When people told me they don’t want to start this series because it’s too monstrous, I honestly can’t agree with that.

    and

    were too short for me; with each book’s conclusion I always ended up craving more, and that’s still true here.

    is a staggering 450k words or 1243 pages and somehow, it’s still not enough. Plus, each book in the series feels like a special limited edition. Starting from the beautiful endpapers by Dan Dos Santos and Howard Lyon, then the gorgeous chapter icons and twenty-two interior artworks by amazing artists such as Miranda Meeks, Kelly Harris, Ben McSweeney, Isaac Steward and once again, Dan Dos Santos, we are given so much in order to enrich our imagination and experience.

    At the time of writing this review, I have around one hundred physical books and only three of them—

    ,

    , and

    —are hardcovers. I won’t go into full detail on why I dislike hardcover, but to explain it as simply as possible, they’re heavy, uncomfortable to read, and super expensive. However, I have to make a special exception for this series because of its gorgeous artworks and satisfying value. I spent $45 to buy the HC of

    , (it is that expensive where I live) but it was truly money well spent and I’ll do it again for future installments of the series.

    I have talked a LOT about this book. Let’s get to the most important questions:

    -Is

    a worthy sequel?

    -Is it better than the previous books?

    It’s definitely better than

    but not

    In my opinion, it’s equal to

    in terms of quality. There are some things that

    did better, especially when it comes to intimate and evocative scenes, and there are also some ways in which

    surpasses it, such as plot and world building. However, this will be the first time I actually have some cons—though they are minor—with any installment in this series.

    To me, the main character of the series is Kaladin. This is almost completely a Dalinar and somehow, Shallan’s book. I know, I know, it was meant to be written that way, and I have no complaint about how it’s written. However, Kaladin’s storyline didn’t truly begin until halfway through the book, which took 600 pages; before that, his POV was scarce and close to nonexistent despite him making an appearance in other character’s POV.

    It’s just a matter of preference; Dalinar’s, Shallan’s, and everyone’s storyline are incredibly compelling in their own way, but Kaladin and Bridge Four will always be special and remained one of the most illuminating parts of the series for me. Secondly, I mentioned in my

    review that I fell in love with Shallan’s character there, but

    changed my mind on this. Shallan’s growth—though fascinating and making the plot more interesting—occurred in ways that made me dislike her character. Shallan is, in fact, the first female character written by Sanderson that I dislike at this point, and I sometimes even found her infuriating. Lastly, there are two scenes that I wish didn’t happen off-screen.

    Do know that these are minor cons, and that the three books in

    totally stand above almost all books I’ve ever read in the genre.

    is not a perfect book by any means, but just like true love, I absolutely love this book with all my heart despite some flaws it had. Diving into this series is like diving into a long-term relationship, and one I’m glad to partake in. Call me selfish but right now, I’m at the point where I’ll be completely happy if Sanderson decides to drop all his outside of Cosmere universe works. I just can’t bring myself to care about his other books outside of Cosmere when in fact, I already know that the Cosmere and this series comprise his magnum opus.

    This will probably be my last epic fantasy novel review of the year. I binge reread and read the series so far within three weeks and now I’m in a major

    , I will need at least a month before starting another epic fantasy series unless I’m willing to risk rating them unfairly. That said, I’m going to end my review here, this has become the longest review I ever wrote so far and trust me, there are a myriad amount of things I left out for the sake of making this review as spoiler-free as possible for your maximum reading experience.

    is not just a book, it’s a grimoire that’s filled with magical power capable of transporting me to the best kind of escapism experience.

    (I haven’t read

    yet so this might change in the future.)

    has always been one of the series which I urge anyone to start as soon as possible, and this is still true. Waiting for the completion of this series before diving into it is ridiculous; not only are you going to have to wait at least twenty years before its completion, but we don’t even know what the future holds for this series, and for each one of us. Do. Not. Wait.


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