Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America by Samhita Mukhopadhyay

Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America

Twenty-Three Leading Feminist Writers on Protest and SolidarityWhen 53 percent of white women voted for Donald Trump and 94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton, how can women unite in Trump's America? Nasty Women includes inspiring essays from a diverse group of talented women writers who seek to provide a broad look at how we got here and what we need to do t...

Title:Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America Reviews

  • Lauren Bourke

    A great read for anyone disillusioned by the current state of American politics, specifically by who occupies the White House. The essays bring all points of the feminist movement into view, not just the needs of the white/cisgendered population, which is important as the future of our country depends on the equal inclusion of all those who have a stake in this country. The essays allow you to commiserate with like minded individuals also traumatized by the outcome of the election, but then quic

    A great read for anyone disillusioned by the current state of American politics, specifically by who occupies the White House. The essays bring all points of the feminist movement into view, not just the needs of the white/cisgendered population, which is important as the future of our country depends on the equal inclusion of all those who have a stake in this country. The essays allow you to commiserate with like minded individuals also traumatized by the outcome of the election, but then quickly encourage you to shake off your self pity and continue to fight. Intelligent, well written, and thought provoking, everything a good manifesto should be.

  • Nenia *The Flagrant Liberal* Campbell

    ||

    ||

    ||

    ||

    The last presidential election made me very upset. Like many Americans, I asked myself, "How did this man get elected?" But also, "Why were so many people willing to overlook all the terrible things he said? Why did 53% of women vote for him, despite the remarks he made about women of all kinds?" And, most terrifyingly of all: "How did we become so willing to turn a blind eye to, or, worse, actively participate in or encourage acts of aggre

    ||

    ||

    ||

    ||

    The last presidential election made me very upset. Like many Americans, I asked myself, "How did this man get elected?" But also, "Why were so many people willing to overlook all the terrible things he said? Why did 53% of women vote for him, despite the remarks he made about women of all kinds?" And, most terrifyingly of all: "How did we become so willing to turn a blind eye to, or, worse, actively participate in or encourage acts of aggression and hate towards those who are different?"

    NASTY WOMEN is a collection of essays from various feminist writers about Hillary's campaign, Trump's victory, and what they believe the aftermath of the election means for women - and for Americans, more broadly.

    Some of the essays are filled with anger, some with sadness, some with hope. Some of the essays are written by queer women and women of color. Some of the essays are written by women who were born here, and some from women who came here as immigrants. There is a lot of diversity in these essays, which really added depth to this collection and made it complex and multi-faceted.

    I've included a break-down of all the essays in my status updates for this book on Goodreads (

    ), but here is a collection of what I see as this book's "greatest hits."

    "Are Women Persons?" by Kate Harding discusses the flaws of some of the pioneering feminists, like Susan B. Anthony, who was definitely a product of her times in that she could be racist as f*ck. It cautions that historically, feminism was a white upper-class women's issue; and while these women helped paved the road for where we are now and their frustration at being held back by condescending men still resonates for many, we must not make their mistakes by throwing people of color under the bus or failing to include them when advancing feminist issues.

    "Trump, The Global Gag Rule, and the Terror of Misinformation" by Jill Filipovic goes into Trump's extremely cruel expansion of the gag rule, which basically penalizes foreign groups from discussing or providing abortions and birth control to foreign countries. It's heart-breaking, but powerful.

    "Is There Ever a Right Time to Talk to Your Children About Fascism?" by Kera Bolonik is written by the granddaughter of holocaust survivors and discusses how many of Trump's supporters and campaign tactics mirror that of fascist Germany during WWII.

    "Permission to Vote for a Monster: Ivanka Trump and Faux Feminism" by Jessica Valenti turned out to be one of my favorites. It's a discussion of the women conservatives champion - women who are content to play by the rules set by men and who don't want to make waves, and condemns conservative women who co-opt "feminism" to push their own agendas. It helps explain the mentality of the white women who voted for Trump.

    "X Cuntry: A Muslim-American Woman's Journey" by Randa Jarrar was so weird and so unlike any of the other more traditionally formatted essays in this book that it ended up being totally memorable. It's a series of dream-like diary entries written by a Palestinian immigrant discussing her encounters with racism in the toxic sociopolitical climate leading up to Trump's election.

    "Trust Black Women" by Zerlina Maxwell gives the reasons black women overwhelmingly (94%) voted for Hillary Clinton. It's a good essay. There were several other similar essays in this collection, but I felt like this one was the best. Maybe because it ends on a note of hope & I'm a hopeless fool.

    "All American" by Nicole Chung ends this book on a strong, resonant note. Chung is the adopted daughter of two white people (she's Korean-American). She talks about how the aftermath of the election has affected her, and her fear for her children because of their ethnicity and also because one of them has autism. She discusses the countless microaggressions she encounters from people who are so ignorant that they don't even realize they're being offensive, and the tense discussions with her conservative parents who voted for Trump and regard anyone different as suspicious.

    This really is a fantastic collection from a varied and talented group of essayists. I would honestly recommend this book to anyone who was #WithHer and is feeling angry, scared, hopeless, or sad. The editors went out of their way to include a diverse array of women with many different views when it comes to the dual but related subjects of liberalism and feminism. I heartily recommend it!

    Bonus pictures from the SF Women's March:

    4 to 4.5 stars

  • Jackie

    I read every essay from this book. I read several to my boyfriend. While each essay didn't strike a chord for me, many did. I think this is an important read for all women living in the US today. See this as your call to action. If you are conservative, see this as a book that teaches you about the other women in your life. Read it out loud to your boyfriend/girlfriend. Tweet your representatives about your opinions (I did this yesterday for the first time!). I will be purchasing a copy for my s

    I read every essay from this book. I read several to my boyfriend. While each essay didn't strike a chord for me, many did. I think this is an important read for all women living in the US today. See this as your call to action. If you are conservative, see this as a book that teaches you about the other women in your life. Read it out loud to your boyfriend/girlfriend. Tweet your representatives about your opinions (I did this yesterday for the first time!). I will be purchasing a copy for my sister and trying to force my mom to read a few of the essays as well to start slowly teaching her my views. Thank you Picador for publishing this important work.

    Note: I received a free Advanced Reader's Copy (uncorrected bound manuscript) from the publisher, Picador. I requested this copy, as I was very motivated to read this title. All reviews expressed below are my own. If you would like to read more about my review and why this was an important read for me, please check out my blog

    .

    Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America is a collection of 23 essays in response to the 2016 United States presidential election. The essays focus along the theme of feminism and each writer focuses on what this means to them.

    I am not the biggest fan of nonfiction. I have to read a lot of nonfiction for my job, so it often feels like work when I try to read nonfiction for leisure. But when I saw this title announced on Picador's Instagram, I knew I needed to read it.

    I will not go into detail about all of the essays and cannot quote them, as I have an uncorrected copy of the text, but this book was amazing. It gave me so many action items (small and large) that I can use to speak up about in our current political scene. I highly recommend this book for female readers. I recommend it for women who voted to Hillary and also women who voted for Trump. I think this is the perfect time for us to come together and to talk about our opinions, rather than segregating ourselves with others who already share our views.

    This is not an easy read - it took me several weeks to work my way through the essays. At times, it made me embarrassed about my limited support and activism during the election. But it left me feeling hopeful and empowered to make a change.

  • DalaiMommaReadingDrama

    Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America by Samhita Mukhopadhyay because right now we are in Trump's America...and according to the way things have turned up...I suppose I'm one of those Nasty Women. So the desire to read this....yeah.

    In a nutshell: 23 high profile feminist and their thoughts on what is going on, what went wrong, and what we need to do to make the most of what the heck just happened. Inspiring essays...fantastic writing styles...the power of words fr

    Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump's America by Samhita Mukhopadhyay because right now we are in Trump's America...and according to the way things have turned up...I suppose I'm one of those Nasty Women. So the desire to read this....yeah.

    In a nutshell: 23 high profile feminist and their thoughts on what is going on, what went wrong, and what we need to do to make the most of what the heck just happened. Inspiring essays...fantastic writing styles...the power of words from some very smart women.

    It truly is a phenomenal read. I'm not going to go into the details however I will say this...let this book serve to be a voice from all the angry people, all the people injusticed by the outcome, let it educate you on what other people feel and why. Open mind...food for thought....a defiant opinion...what ever this book does for you...even if you don't agree with it....just read it.

    Thanks as always to the wonderful peeps of goodreads for my free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review to which I gladly and voluntarily gave.

  • Amanda

    I'm going to start by saying that I actually read this. I can't believe I have to put that, but based on most of the star ratings, with no written reviews, on a book that isn't out until next week, it is clear that many have not. Ironic considering the point of the essays in this book. (And yes, I do believe that 5 star reviews by people who don't read the book are also an issue. I hate when people do that just because they "love" the author or topic.)

    This book is phenomenal. As with most essay

    I'm going to start by saying that I actually read this. I can't believe I have to put that, but based on most of the star ratings, with no written reviews, on a book that isn't out until next week, it is clear that many have not. Ironic considering the point of the essays in this book. (And yes, I do believe that 5 star reviews by people who don't read the book are also an issue. I hate when people do that just because they "love" the author or topic.)

    This book is phenomenal. As with most essay questions, some are better than others, but all will make you think. This isn't always the most comfortable book to read, even as a woman. YMMV based on where you fall along many spectrums (race, gender, sexual preference, etc.,) but it is important that we read books that make us uncomfortable. Going out of your comfort zone is often how one learns, so read hard books once in awhile.

    This comes out next Tuesday (Oct 3, 2017) and you should pick it up. I recommend the paper version as my Kindle version is now full of more highlights and bookmarks than anything I've read since college. I'll be picking up a paper copy for my bookshelf.

    Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for an advanced reader copy.

  • Tonstant Weader

    Nasty Women is a collection of 23 essays responding to the Great Betrayal that was the 2016 election. Edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay and Kate Harding, this collection unites the voices of women with all kinds of identities in contemplation of the world we woke up to on November 9th.

    For some reason, the media is far more interested in the belligerent whining of white men and white women whose feelings were hurt by black hands on the steering wheel of state and who were damn sure they didn’t want

    Nasty Women is a collection of 23 essays responding to the Great Betrayal that was the 2016 election. Edited by Samhita Mukhopadhyay and Kate Harding, this collection unites the voices of women with all kinds of identities in contemplation of the world we woke up to on November 9th.

    For some reason, the media is far more interested in the belligerent whining of white men and white women whose feelings were hurt by black hands on the steering wheel of state and who were damn sure they didn’t want no woman’s hands driving next. We are supposed to have compassion for all the suffering they endure in their victory.

    Meanwhile, the media has no interest in what it feels like to work for and support the candidate who won the most votes, who was the most qualified, only to see a constitutional defect to protect slavery hand the country over to an ignorant, unqualified, thuggish grifter. I don’t know about you, but I think that’s a more interesting story. After all, we won the most votes and they got the White House anyway – in large part due to structural failings that should disturb us. After all, two of the last three guys handed the keys to the national car lost the popular vote. That’s no democracy. Why isn’t the media interested in what it feels like to be robbed of America’s promise again?

    Thankfully, the editors of Nasty Women are interested. With essays by women who are White, Black, Asian, Latino, Native American, straight, lesbian, transgender, citizens, immigrants, urban, rural, blue state and red state, this is a cross-section of Hillary voting women who have every right to be angry and who have something to say about it. These are voices we are not hearing from enough. These are the real stories of this election.

    Nasty Women is as good as anthology like this can be. Not every essay spoke to me and a few of them made me roll my eyes when they fell into the familiar “flawed candidate” rut that prefaced every statement of support for Hillary before the election. She’s not running for anything now, so must we still follow that script? The majority of essays though were affirming, empowering, and challenging pieces that dissected the misogyny than demands we enumerate her flaws before saying anything positive. Sarah Jaffe’s essay was particularly discordant, echoing many of the familiar denunciations of Clinton, even bringing up her very short service on the Wal-Mart board and repeating Sanders’ smears on her character. But that is just one of twenty-three and many are excellent.

    I was particularly moved by editor Samhita Mukhopadhyay’s defense of identity politics. It’s appalling that post-election analysis is so shoddy as to suggest abandoning the voters we have in pursuit of voters presumed more worthy because they are white and male. This is not giving up a bird in hand for two in the bush. It’s giving up a bird in hand for a myth in the bush. Rebecca Solnit’s essay was perhaps my favorite. She called out the “flawed candidate” trope in particular and took on the pathology of “progressive” men who hated Clinton. How many of us were floored during the primary by the atavistic hatred of her voiced by men we had always thought of us a liberal, smart, and feminist? Sady Doyle’s essay is important, too, in pointing out how calling Trump crazy is excusing his evil and the evil of those who voted to give him power. Carino Chocano’s essay was another that spoke to me because, to be honest, I am far more angry with those on the left who helped elect Trump by hating Clinton than with those on the right from whom I did not expect better.

    Rebecca Solnit’s essay was perhaps my favorite. She called out the “flawed candidate” trope in particular and took on the pathology of “progressive” men who hated Clinton. How many of us were floored during the primary by the atavistic hatred of her voiced by men we had always thought of us a liberal, smart, and feminist? Sady Doyle’s essay is important, too, in pointing out how calling Trump crazy is excusing his evil and the evil of those who voted to give him power. Carino Chocano’s essay was another that spoke to me because, to be honest, I am far more angry with those on the left who helped elect Trump by hating Clinton than with those on the right from whom I did not expect better. Though, on the other hand, Nicole Chung’s essay makes me ask if I should have challenged the Trump voters in my family more. They voted for Trump in spite of Black and Native American family members who will be hurt by Trump’s bigotry. They voted for Trump despite gay, lesbian, and trans children and siblings. What can someone say in the face of that indifference to the human cost of their votes? Their identity as white and rural was more powerful than their identity as sister or brother, mother or father. What can anyone say in the face of that and still be family?

    Nasty Women is not comforting unless the notion that other people are just as mad as you are is comforting. What it does is challenge us to not give in, not give up and to pick up the struggle and persist. If you were broken-hearted on November 9th, this won’t mend your heart, but it will pick up and set you in the direction of fixing what breaks us.

    I received an e-galley of Nasty Women from Picador through NetGalley.

    Nasty Women at Macmillan / Picador

    Samhita Mukhopadhyay author site

    Kate Harding author site

  • Peggy

    This is the best book I have read so far this year. The diversity of each author's essay and perspective is thought provoking. I think this book of essays would make a perfect book club selection for discussion. It's impossible for me to pick a favorite essay but 2 that I especially loved were "As long as it's Healthy" and "All-American".

  • Melissa

    If you read one essay from this book, read Mary Kathryn Nagle’s “Nasty Native Women” - that is a history lesson and a sermon in one.

    And once you’ve read that, read the rest of the book. The contributors are diverse, the subjects and responses are diverse, and the ideas for what to do next are myriad.

  • sharon

    I feel like I've been waiting for this book since the election. It is so, so cathartic to witness the rage and grief of other women over our current administration. Especially appreciated the attention paid to soliciting contributions beyond the usual roster of white, cishet, able-bodied women -- this was a truly intersectional collection with a wide range of viewpoints and suggestions for how to move forward, with the overall message that what is important is that we do, all of us, find a way f

    I feel like I've been waiting for this book since the election. It is so, so cathartic to witness the rage and grief of other women over our current administration. Especially appreciated the attention paid to soliciting contributions beyond the usual roster of white, cishet, able-bodied women -- this was a truly intersectional collection with a wide range of viewpoints and suggestions for how to move forward, with the overall message that what is important is that we do, all of us, find a way forward.

  • Megan Prokott

    Overall, this essay collection is worth a read if you're looking to participate, learn, or even just commiserate on our tragic political state.

    Full review here:

Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.