What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky by Kelsey Oseid

What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky

A richly illustrated guide to the myths, histories, and science of the celestial bodies of our solar system, with stories and information about constellations, planets, comets, the northern lights, and more. Combining art, mythology, and science, What We See in the Stars gives readers a tour of the night sky through more than 100 magical pieces of original art, all accom...

Title:What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky
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Edition Language:English

What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky Reviews

  • Nostalgia Reader

    3.5 stars.

    First up: The illustrations in this are gorgeous. The short paint strokes and the various shades of blue really capture the depth of space. I can only imagine how awesome they will look on the printed page, especially if glossy ink/paper is used.

    Overall, the information presented in this book is an excellent introduction to the constellations, planets, and other aspects of our universe. I found myself constantly comparing it to H.A. Rey’s

    –much of the information here is si

    3.5 stars.

    First up: The illustrations in this are gorgeous. The short paint strokes and the various shades of blue really capture the depth of space. I can only imagine how awesome they will look on the printed page, especially if glossy ink/paper is used.

    Overall, the information presented in this book is an excellent introduction to the constellations, planets, and other aspects of our universe. I found myself constantly comparing it to H.A. Rey’s

    –much of the information here is similar to what’s presented in Rey’s book, but Oseid’s presentation is a bit more simplistic and a better jumping off point for younger audiences.

    The book’s main selling point, the overview of constellations, are well done, but I had a few peeves with them. Each of the major constellations gets a page with an illustration of the constellation, and a brief rundown of the mythological story(ies) behind it and some mentions of deep space objects contained within the constellation. However, each constellation is presented by itself against a general background, with no other constellations surrounding it. Additionally, none of the deep space objects mentioned are pointed to in the drawing. It was also a bit odd that there was not even a sky chart overview, showing the constellations of both hemispheres, to at least provide some basic orienting. Northern and Southern constellations were also not distinguished in this section, which could be confusing for some readers.

    The rest of the book provides a general overview of each of the planets, meteors and asteroids and comets, and deep space. These sections provide excellent jumping off points for research about the topics–I know I would have loved this as a source when I did some Solar System reports in grade school!

    While I still prefer Rey’s book to this, this is an excellent “beginner Rey” book to give to younger kids, especially if they need a source for a report. It’s also just lovely to look at, so it would make a pretty companion to any astronomy shelf.

    Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a free copy to review!

    (Cross posted on

    .)

  • Laura

    Do you remember looking up at the stars as a kid, being told that is Orion's Belt, Casiopea's Chair or that is the Big Dipper, and all you could see were stars, not the picture the names suggested. And when you looked at reference books, they weren't much better help.

    This book is for the kid in us, as well as kids today. It is so cool. Well researched, well documented, and lovely pictures, showing which stars are supposed to represent what parts of the constellation. There is also a little bit o

    Do you remember looking up at the stars as a kid, being told that is Orion's Belt, Casiopea's Chair or that is the Big Dipper, and all you could see were stars, not the picture the names suggested. And when you looked at reference books, they weren't much better help.

    This book is for the kid in us, as well as kids today. It is so cool. Well researched, well documented, and lovely pictures, showing which stars are supposed to represent what parts of the constellation. There is also a little bit of history, and what the brightest star is. This last bit is important, because depending on the light pollution in the area you are in, you might only be able to see the brightest star.

    Each major constellation is written about, both ancient as well as modern. But, wait, there is more. This book also covers the Milky Way, the Sun and the phases of the moon.

    The only failing is that there is not a large foldout start chart showing where to find all the stars, although that would be rather hard, because it is different depending where you are in the world.

    Highly recommend this book for classrooms, libraries and personal homes.

    Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    MY BLOG:

  • Michelle (In Libris Veritas)

    4.5 Stars

    Full review to come!

  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    We took a family trip to a planetarium last year. The boy child swears that I liked it the most of anyone in the family. (I totally did) But it did give us the 'want to know more' when it comes to looking up at the stars. I snatched up this book when given a chance.

    It has images of the constellations...

    With little tidbits about each.

    A section on the moon.

    The sun.

    The planets.

    Cute little guidebook!

  • Crystal

    Oseid’s work is comprehensive in scope, but simple in format. In her introduction to the constellations, she provides a general overview of constellations and their relation to humans throughout history. For instance, most of the constellations’ names are mythologically based because Ptolemy (the second century philosopher who named them) was Greco-Egyptian. And did you know that what we consider constellations are actually asterisms? And that Islamic scholars named stars during the medieval per

    Oseid’s work is comprehensive in scope, but simple in format. In her introduction to the constellations, she provides a general overview of constellations and their relation to humans throughout history. For instance, most of the constellations’ names are mythologically based because Ptolemy (the second century philosopher who named them) was Greco-Egyptian. And did you know that what we consider constellations are actually asterisms? And that Islamic scholars named stars during the medieval period, which was also the “Islamic Golden Age”? Oseid also places key terms in bold type, making it easy for readers to locate definitions that they want to reread later.

    Each of the ancient constellations receives a full-page layout, which includes a description of its placement in the cosmos and other interesting pieces of trivia. Aquila, for instance, crops up numerous times as an eagle in Greek mythology; it is also one of the stars closest to Earth. Pegasus, on the other hand, represents the seventh largest constellation. And Libra contains “a potentially habitable exoplanet.” Celestial illustrations accompany the text, which is generally limited to two paragraphs.

    Halfway through the book, Oseid introduces readers to the modern constellations, which number thirty-eight in total. These star formations are divided into three sections: those named after tools, those named after animals, and those named after miscellaneous items. The illustrations for these constellations are smaller and appear two, three, or four to a page, with a succinct description to accompany each name. Moving beyond the stars, Oseid then discusses the sun, moon, planets and more!

    What We See in the Stars is a physically attractive book. The cover features illustrations of the constellations—colored in shades of blue—with metallic dots set among them to trace the stars’ actual pattern. The book’s dimensions (approximately eight inches by eight inches) lend to easy handling. Thanks to the hardcover format and the pages woven into the spine, it should withstand years of use.

    The contents of this book exceed expectation. The cover/title suggests that the book is just about the constellations. However, Oseid also explores the moon (including a two-page spread showing its phases, the sun and its eclipses, the planets (each with its own full-page illustration), and other phenomena such as comets. In addition to exploring the nighttime sky, Oseid’s book doubles as a general overview of Greek mythology. Highly recommended.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from Blogging for Books, in exchange for an honest review.

  • destiny ☠ howling libraries

    My word, this book is, first and foremost, STUNNING. The artwork is by far the loveliest I have ever seen in a nonfiction title. Even if you aren't interested in the stars and learning about constellations, I cannot recommend this book enough as a "coffee table" book - one of those that you pick up just to leave sitting out like interactive artwork, because your guests will pick it up, and "oooh" and "ahhh" and positively rave about it.

    On to the actual content of the book, if you're at all inter

    My word, this book is, first and foremost, STUNNING. The artwork is by far the loveliest I have ever seen in a nonfiction title. Even if you aren't interested in the stars and learning about constellations, I cannot recommend this book enough as a "coffee table" book - one of those that you pick up just to leave sitting out like interactive artwork, because your guests will pick it up, and "oooh" and "ahhh" and positively rave about it.

    On to the actual content of the book, if you're at all interested in learning about the stars and space, this would be a great, easy introduction to the topic. Not only are there illustrations of each constellation, but there are also tidbits of history, as well as tips on how to find the brightest star in each one and locate that specific constellation. I learned so much and it made me really eager for the next clear night sky, so that I can go somewhere plenty dark and try to find some of the new stars I learned about!

  • Amalia Gavea

    In high school, I was an excellent student in every subject that had to do with Languages, Literature, History and so on and so forth. Maths was the very bane of my existence, Physics and Chemistry were very effective sleeping methods and once or twice, I ‘’fell asleep’’ while I was awake, overlooking the schoolyard. There were two exceptions, though. Biology and Technology. I’ve always been fascinated by the perfect way in which every living organism functions and Technology was always full of

    In high school, I was an excellent student in every subject that had to do with Languages, Literature, History and so on and so forth. Maths was the very bane of my existence, Physics and Chemistry were very effective sleeping methods and once or twice, I ‘’fell asleep’’ while I was awake, overlooking the schoolyard. There were two exceptions, though. Biology and Technology. I’ve always been fascinated by the perfect way in which every living organism functions and Technology was always full of projects and projects were a cause for a feast for me. Now, one day, our Technology professor gave us an assignment that I have kept to this day, some 15-odd years later. She told us to create a project about the field of Science we loved most and I chose Astronomy. Not to blow one’s trumpet, but it was a blast and one of the finest (and thankfully, there were many) moments in high school.

    Who doesn’t love gazing at the night sky? Especially when we’re away from our light- polluted cities (you who live in rural areas know that you have my eternal admiration and envy…) and the sky above us appears darker, richer, intimidating, endless and eternal. Watching documentaries and reading about Space makes you feel humble, it makes you realise that you are tinier than tiny, a speck of dust in the mysterious universe. Books such as this one should be ideal for those who wish to start reading about the planets, the constellations and all the magic that happens right above our heads and little gems for those of us who have read extensively on the subject.

    Kelsey Oseid has created a lovely book that succeeds in being both aesthetically beautiful and extremely informative. Full of impressive sketches coloured in celestial blue, white and gold, the mythological figures that gave their names to the planets and the constellations come alive. It provides information on the myths, the stories and the scientists that made the most significant discoveries and observations. The readers learn all about the wonderful world above our heads, from the zodiac to the dwarf planets in a language that is clear, simple, but not simplistic. I don’t think it is suitable for children since there are quite a few scientific references and technology, but the teenagers will have no issues with it if they are interested in this glorious infinity we call Space. It is a jewel for every bookcase and a wonderful addition to the books that aim in making certain fields of Science more approachable to the laymen.

    My reviews can also be found on

  • Dena (Batch of Books)

    Kids that like outer space, astronomy, stars, and constellations will love exploring the night sky with What We See in the Stars by Kelsey Oseid.

    My kids and I enjoyed several things about this book.

    It's Beautifully Illustrated.

    If you've followed

    for any length of time, you'll know I'm a sucker for pretty art. The illustrations in this book are gorgeous.

    And it's illustrated all the way through. It's not just a picture here and there. Every page has art on it, which makes the book more eng

    Kids that like outer space, astronomy, stars, and constellations will love exploring the night sky with What We See in the Stars by Kelsey Oseid.

    My kids and I enjoyed several things about this book.

    It's Beautifully Illustrated.

    If you've followed

    for any length of time, you'll know I'm a sucker for pretty art. The illustrations in this book are gorgeous.

    And it's illustrated all the way through. It's not just a picture here and there. Every page has art on it, which makes the book more engaging and visually pleasing.

    It's Informative.

    While it IS beautiful, that's not all it has to offer. What We See in the Stars is full of fascinating facts, information, and history behind the night sky.

    Learn everything from constellations and history to planets and phases of the moon. There's even a section about comets and meteors. A large portion of the book is dedicated to constellations, facts about them, and the stories behind them.

    It's Interesting.

    Nonfiction books have progressed in leaps and bounds in recent years, and this is a great example of that progress. Just because it's informative doesn't mean it has to be boring.

    Kids (and adults) that are interested in the night sky will easily find themselves engrossed in this book. It's easy to peruse, but it's also easy to get lost in.

  • Leah Rachel

    What We See in the Stars is a fun and educational book about space. I knew before opening this book by Kelsey Oseid that it would be a book full of gorgeous, mainly blue-and-grey watercolor-like illustrations of the sky and all that it contains.

    But I wasn’t expecting it to teach me as much as it did. I expected more of a coffee-table book on the stars—beautiful, but telling me things I mostly knew. I was wrong. This book taught me a lot that I didn’t know about the night sky and how we understa

    What We See in the Stars is a fun and educational book about space. I knew before opening this book by Kelsey Oseid that it would be a book full of gorgeous, mainly blue-and-grey watercolor-like illustrations of the sky and all that it contains.

    But I wasn’t expecting it to teach me as much as it did. I expected more of a coffee-table book on the stars—beautiful, but telling me things I mostly knew. I was wrong. This book taught me a lot that I didn’t know about the night sky and how we understand space. It dove into Ptolemy’s contributions, and thought me the scientific definition of a constellation, describing which constellations are backed by science and what kind of stars and systems take up those spaces in the sky. It taught me that our North Star will change based on a 26,000-year cycle of the tilt of earth’s axis, and that in the time of ancient Egypt, the North Star was Thuban in the constellation of Draco, not Polaris—and in 21,000 years, it will be Thuban again. It turns out that a lot of planets’ moon and crater names are themed: Venus has craters all named after famous women and female goddesses, including Lakshmi and Tubman, and the moons of Uranus are all named after Shakespearean characters. I highly recommend this book—it is both beautiful and will teach any reader something new about the sky above our heads.

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