Calling My Name by Liara Tamani

Calling My Name

"Taja Brown knows her place and the restrictions within her conservative and tight-knit African American family, but she suddenly feels left behind watching her friends go through a world of firsts — from kisses to boyfriends to everything in between. But everything shifts when Taja falls in love for the first time. Tamani creates a raw, relatable, and eloquently-told comi...

Title:Calling My Name
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Calling My Name Reviews

  • Nikki S

    02/15/2017:

    African American girl. Growing up IN Houston, Texas?! GIMMIE.

    10/22/2017:

    Eh..... Real review to come.

  • Morelia (Strandedinbooks)

    Set in Houston, TX? Where I was born and raised? YES PLEASE!

  • Tiffany Nichols

    Loved this book! Having 3 daughters, I find it especially important expose them to books with main characters with whom they can relate. Not only is it a beautiful story, but the author does such an amazing job of transporting you right into the main character's shoes. We need more positive books like this! Great read!

  • Candace

    This is a quietly beautiful book. It's lyrical, soft and easy. It's a story that spans time with only light theme within it. There's no urgency and what kept me reading was the beautiful writing. While not in verse it had a similar feel to it.

    It has a theme of the MC being in a religious family and feeling those pressures to always be good.

    If I were to complain it would be that I wish it had expanded on this more. But that is largely because of my own beliefs and way I was raised. I do not bel

    This is a quietly beautiful book. It's lyrical, soft and easy. It's a story that spans time with only light theme within it. There's no urgency and what kept me reading was the beautiful writing. While not in verse it had a similar feel to it.

    It has a theme of the MC being in a religious family and feeling those pressures to always be good.

    If I were to complain it would be that I wish it had expanded on this more. But that is largely because of my own beliefs and way I was raised. I do not believe in organized religion but I am spiritual. Nature is my church. ;)

    The book also takes place in the 90's and early 2000's (I believe). I was a 90's kid so I connected with some of that. While it's very different than my life was, I still really connected with it. And that really speaks loudly that this is a really good story.

    The debate was whether I'll pass this to my 12 year old and I've decided to wait. The suggested age is 14+ and that sounds right. I WILL be saving it for her though as I think it's a great story to see in the life of a family different from ours and reading other people's stories, who are different, is important to have a wider view of the world.

  • Sarah

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a teenage girl called Taja.

    Taja was such a normal sort of girl with the normal sort of girl worries. I felt really sorry for her and the way she felt left out compared to her brother and sister, and the way she wasn’t prepared for her first period. She was also subject to a lot of peer pressure.

    The storyline in this was about Taja growing up, and her worries over God a

    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.)

    This was a YA contemporary story about a teenage girl called Taja.

    Taja was such a normal sort of girl with the normal sort of girl worries. I felt really sorry for her and the way she felt left out compared to her brother and sister, and the way she wasn’t prepared for her first period. She was also subject to a lot of peer pressure.

    The storyline in this was about Taja growing up, and her worries over God and sins. Her parents kept warning her how premarital sex was a sin, once she had got her first boyfriend, and even made her sign a purity pledge. Taja wanted to be like everyone else though, whilst dealing with the guilt of maybe going too far and sinning.

    The ending to this was okay, and I was pleased that Taja got a fairly happy ending.

    6.5 out of 10

  • Shenwei

    a poetic coming of age story that portrays emotions in a viscerally engaging way. Taja's adolescent confusion, curiosity, and conflicted feelings about sex and her religion are captured very well.

    that all said, there were some really cringe-worthy microaggressions here and there that put me off

    TWs: body/fat-shaming, ableism, transmisia, slut-shaming/misogyny, racism

    -the most prevalent microaggressions were body/fat-shaming, and it was kind of hypocritical coming from someone who was insecure abo

    a poetic coming of age story that portrays emotions in a viscerally engaging way. Taja's adolescent confusion, curiosity, and conflicted feelings about sex and her religion are captured very well.

    that all said, there were some really cringe-worthy microaggressions here and there that put me off

    TWs: body/fat-shaming, ableism, transmisia, slut-shaming/misogyny, racism

    -the most prevalent microaggressions were body/fat-shaming, and it was kind of hypocritical coming from someone who was insecure about her own appearance and felt like everyone was probably judging her for it. the narrative tried to address oppressive ideologies of attractiveness and value through a teacher who challenged them to look at what ads and society tells us to value and messages that you feel lesser. but that was undermined when the narrative proceeded to describe a girl as manlike and gross for having leg hair on the next page with zero self-critical reflection.

    -the r-slur is used multiple times in this one paragraph and it made me super uncomfortable even though it was not directed at about person but rather the protagonist's inner anxiety going on a self hating rant.

    -then there was the use of "Chinese eyes" to describe a character. only once but that was a real WTF to me -_-

    -the slut-shaming and gendered double standards surrounding sex are addressed in text, though.

  • Ms. Yingling

    I was intrigued by the cover and didn't read the description. Definitely a Young Adult/New Adult book, with graphic sexual content. Lyrical writing made it somewhat challenging to follow plot. Just not a middle grade novel

  • Kimberley

    Imagine yourself as a young girl, unsure of herself, and trying desperately to find your footing in a world where the messages are mixed (at best), and wrong (at worst). That’s where we first meet Taja.

    As she navigates the social spectrum—from middle and on through high school—she’s forced to answer questions about who she wants to be: her parents expect her to remain steeped in God. He is to be her eternal guide where all decisions of the heart, head, and body are concerned.

    Unfortunately for

    Imagine yourself as a young girl, unsure of herself, and trying desperately to find your footing in a world where the messages are mixed (at best), and wrong (at worst). That’s where we first meet Taja.

    As she navigates the social spectrum—from middle and on through high school—she’s forced to answer questions about who she wants to be: her parents expect her to remain steeped in God. He is to be her eternal guide where all decisions of the heart, head, and body are concerned.

    Unfortunately for her parents, Taja’s growing interest in all things “worldly” makes those boundaries tough to respect—especially when they seem to be invisible where her older brother is concerned.

    Damon, Taja’s brother is able to takes every advantage of the opportunities he’s given—both socially and sexually. No one looks for him to abide by any set of rules because, as Taja’s father put it, it’s just “different” where boys are concerned.

    Needless to say, having grown up with a similar message, I hated it for Taja. There should be no difference! The very fact Taja’s parents and church allowed one to exist made it more confusing for her in the long run.

    But, I digress.

    It’s obvious the author has a love for the writings of many a black author: Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, James Baldwin, Maya Angelou, etc., because much of the prose within

    has a similar poetic voice.

    As one whose enjoyed many of the works of the aforementioned, it’s a voice I could really appreciate.

    That said, there were times when less could certainly have been more.

    The second half of this book more than made up for its slow beginning, and I found myself infinitely more invested in Taja as she began to truly gain confidence in the type of young woman she wanted to be: one built upon terms she felt befit her goals.

    Overall, a wonderfully insightful read about what it means to live and love by your own rules.

  • Lola  Reviewer

    Such an elegant book.

    The cover is elegant, the writing is elegant, the atmosphere is whimsical and contemplative, the heroine is lovely, almost angelically so. Reading the whole story is just a pleasurable experience you won’t soon forget.

    Liara Tamani has written here a very beautiful story about growing up amongst family members that do not always understand you. Although religion is important to Taja, unlike her parents, she feels the need to question some of her beliefs and explore things al

    Such an elegant book.

    The cover is elegant, the writing is elegant, the atmosphere is whimsical and contemplative, the heroine is lovely, almost angelically so. Reading the whole story is just a pleasurable experience you won’t soon forget.

    Liara Tamani has written here a very beautiful story about growing up amongst family members that do not always understand you. Although religion is important to Taja, unlike her parents, she feels the need to question some of her beliefs and explore things all teenagers do… dating, kissing, having sex.

    I loved that we could see Taja grow from a middle grader to a high school student, but we never explicitly know how old she is, and sometimes the chapters jump past months of her life, not explaining everything.

    So that takes getting used to, but when you do, it’s easy to fall in love with Taja and root for her to gain strength and find within herself the courage to stand up for what her heart tells her is right.

    Unfortunately she can’t talk to her parents, because they’d give her a sermon. That’s something I actually didn’t like. I thought she should have had someone to talk with in all seriousness, not just to joke around. Her friends weren’t much help to ease her mind. It’s a journey she had to take upon herself practically alone. But it made her stronger and wiser.

    Taja’s is an authentic teenage voice. Before I realized the book started with her as a middle grader, I found her voice too young, but as she gains life experience and discovers the joys of adolescence (yeah, right), she becomes more and more mature.

    Not only is this a book with a diverse heroine readers can easily connect with, it’s also a book with diverse themes that matter in the life of a teenage girl. Quite recommended.

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

  • Kelly

    This book, set in a recognizable past (my guess is the 90s based on the name checks on things), follows Taja Brown from her middle school through the end of her high school days. It's told through vignettes, in a way that is really unique and engaging, with gorgeous prose to accompany the story.

    Readers looking for stories about religious teens, coming of age as a black girl, and/or the tensions and challenges that can exist between teens and their parents will enjoy this a lot.

    Totally appropri

    This book, set in a recognizable past (my guess is the 90s based on the name checks on things), follows Taja Brown from her middle school through the end of her high school days. It's told through vignettes, in a way that is really unique and engaging, with gorgeous prose to accompany the story.

    Readers looking for stories about religious teens, coming of age as a black girl, and/or the tensions and challenges that can exist between teens and their parents will enjoy this a lot.

    Totally appropriate for younger through older teen readers. Would definitely appeal to fans of brown girl dreaming and would be a great book to pair up with The House on Mango Street.

Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.