Things I'm Seeing Without You by Peter Bognanni

Things I'm Seeing Without You

Seventeen-year-old Tess Fowler has just dropped out of high school. She can barely function after learning of Jonah’s death. Jonah, the boy she’d traded banter with over texts and heartfelt e-mails.Jonah, the first boy she'd told she loved and the first boy to say it back. Jonah, the boy whose suicide she never saw coming. Tess continues to write to Jonah, as a way of proc...

Title:Things I'm Seeing Without You
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Edition Language:English

Things I'm Seeing Without You Reviews

  • Elizabeth La Lettrice

    I've been in a bit of a book rut but this, my friends, is the first book I've read from start to finish in one sitting in a very long time. I also may have sent Snapchats of my ugly crying. Mark your calendars for 9/26/17.

  • Stacee

    3.5 stars

    I tend to stay away from angsty books, but I was sucked in by the pretty cover and the comparison to ATBP.

    I liked Tess well enough. She has an interesting inner monologue and it took me some time to settle into her head space. I did enjoy the interactions between Tess and her father. The funerals are an effective way for Tess to examine what she’s going through.

    Plot wise, there are things happening, but not really any momentum. At times it felt like the relationship with Jonah was sor

    3.5 stars

    I tend to stay away from angsty books, but I was sucked in by the pretty cover and the comparison to ATBP.

    I liked Tess well enough. She has an interesting inner monologue and it took me some time to settle into her head space. I did enjoy the interactions between Tess and her father. The funerals are an effective way for Tess to examine what she’s going through.

    Plot wise, there are things happening, but not really any momentum. At times it felt like the relationship with Jonah was sort of blown out of proportion. I’m not trying to discount her feelings, but I didn’t always see that Jonah was her boyfriend when it felt so casual.

    I did struggle with this book in the beginning. For the first 50+ pages I wondered if the weird {and maybe sort of cringy} feeling I had was because a male author was writing a female teenager. But then Something Happens — it is referenced in the synopsis about Tess getting a message — and it was that occurrence that turned it around for me. I quickly became invested in the outcome.

    And yes, I know I’m being vague and that this review doesn’t make a lot of sense. I’ve typed and deleted several things over and over again.

    Overall, it grabbed me in a way I wasn’t expecting and I really enjoyed the journey.

    **Huge thanks to Dial Books for providing the arc free of charge**

  • Olivia (The Candid Cover)

    I wasn’t really sure what I was going into when I first heard about Things I’m Seeing Without You. It is about a girl who loses her boyfriend to suicide, and the main character has an entertaining personality. But what really drew me in was the alternative funeral business. It makes the story a little bit lighter and glances out the sadness of the story. I really enjoyed this one, and I found it to be a unique approach to the grieving process.

    This book tells the story of a girl recovering from t

    I wasn’t really sure what I was going into when I first heard about Things I’m Seeing Without You. It is about a girl who loses her boyfriend to suicide, and the main character has an entertaining personality. But what really drew me in was the alternative funeral business. It makes the story a little bit lighter and glances out the sadness of the story. I really enjoyed this one, and I found it to be a unique approach to the grieving process.

    This book tells the story of a girl recovering from the suicide of her boyfriend. Their relationship was mostly online, so she logs in and writes to him even though he will never be able to respond. Through her messages, she makes some shocking discoveries about Jonah’s true identity, and even meets someone new. Tess also starts working for her father at his unique funeral business, which helps her cope with her grief. I really enjoyed reading about the business and Tess’s experiences planning unconventional funerals that are more entertaining. This book may seem depressing, but you’ll actually find yourself laughing out loud.

    Tess’s character really lights the mood of this story. She is a high school dropout with a sarcastic and witty attitude. The way she acts and deals with her grief is realistic and believable for someone her age. However, you can tell that she was written by a male author. Tess is easy to sympathize with, and the fact that she loses her first boyfriend is so heartbreaking. She really transforms throughout the book as she moves on, and it is so touching to read.

    This story is actually pretty funny for a book that is about grief. I really enjoyed the way topics like death are handled and balanced out with humour so that the story isn’t all sad. The funeral business provides a lot of comic relief and introduces some quirky characters. Things I’m Seeing Without You really has a unique take on the grieving process, and I would definitely recommend it to those in the mood for a heavier read.

    Things I’m Seeing Without You is a heart-wrenching story about a girl moving on from the death of her first boyfriend. The main character is so real, and her sarcasm brings some humour to the book. This book really blends humour and sorrow, so it isn’t actually as depressing as I had anticipated.

  • Cheri

    !! NOW AVAILABLE !!

    3.5 Stars

    Tess Fowler is seventeen years old, and has recently fallen in love, for the first time, with a boy she met at a party. They’ve kept in touch since then until recently, when a week went by without a text message or any message at all. When she logs onto his facebook page she finds out that he is gone. Suicide.

    !! NOW AVAILABLE !!

    3.5 Stars

    Tess Fowler is seventeen years old, and has recently fallen in love, for the first time, with a boy she met at a party. They’ve kept in touch since then until recently, when a week went by without a text message or any message at all. When she logs onto his facebook page she finds out that he is gone. Suicide.

    She tries, but eventually trying becomes too much, too difficult to face people who know nothing of her pain, who expect too much, and she feels like she is failing everyone, including herself. And so, she makes a decision that changes everything.

    Her mother is off flitting about the world with her latest guy, so when she leaves her Quaker school, she figures that her only real option is to stay at her father’s house. She doesn’t have a very high opinion of him, either.

    He slowly is taking in that his daughter has voluntarily come to stay with him, and rather than jinx it by asking too many questions, perhaps he asks too few. When he questions her about school, her snappy retort has him take a step back, and he thinks maybe she would learn more, for now, to help him in his latest business venture. Funeral planning.

    With enough humour to balance the grieving, this is a story of first love, a story of losing someone you love before you ever got to really know them, a story of parental conflicts, depression, suicide, and the struggle for independence, the struggle to be heard as a person and not as a child.

    Pub Date: 03 Oct 2017

    I won this in a Goodreads giveaway! Many thanks for the ARC to the publisher!

  • Inge

    was a book that held a lot of meaning. At first sight, it is a book about depression, suicide and grief. But when you (gently) brush away that first layer, it is also a book about first loves, second loves, celebrating life, and finding yourself by finding others. That's about as cryptic as I can go.

    I am having quite a hard time forming words right now; can't really seem to get my thoughts on screen.

    was a book that held a lot of meaning. At first sight, it is a book about depression, suicide and grief. But when you (gently) brush away that first layer, it is also a book about first loves, second loves, celebrating life, and finding yourself by finding others. That's about as cryptic as I can go.

    I am having quite a hard time forming words right now; can't really seem to get my thoughts on screen.

    While there are a lot of funerals in this book, I didn't find it particularly sad. While our main character is dealing with the loss of her first boyfriend, it wasn't too heart-breaking. There were definitely some melancholy moments, but overall I found these funerals to be more celebrations of life (e.g. elderly burlesque dancers - Mamie Lee's storyline was probably my favourite), and Tess's love life to be more awkward and uncomfortable. You'll know what I mean when you read it - I couldn't fully get behind her love story, which is a big part of why I enjoyed the first half better than the second one.

    My thoughts seem to be a bit all over the place. Did I like it? Yes. I read the book in two days - it was engaging, quick, and had a lot of heart at times. But I don't think it's a book I will particularly remember a few months from now. There are certainly better mental health books out there. But I would tell you to give this one a try of your own, because it definitely had its unique moments, and it was quite meaningful.

  • ☽ MaryJane ✨

    I won an ARC of this book from the publisher through a GR giveaway which has in no way impacted my review.

    BR with

    I have a lot of mixed feelings towards this story. This a story that packs a really important message. It deals with a lot of difficult topics including grief, love, loss, depression and finding who you are and who you want to be. And because of that, this book is important. All of those mentioned topics are handled really well, in a way that is respectful to the characte

    I won an ARC of this book from the publisher through a GR giveaway which has in no way impacted my review.

    BR with

    I have a lot of mixed feelings towards this story. This a story that packs a really important message. It deals with a lot of difficult topics including grief, love, loss, depression and finding who you are and who you want to be. And because of that, this book is important. All of those mentioned topics are handled really well, in a way that is respectful to the characters and any readers who may have dealt with something similar.

    The descriptions of pain and grief, of living with depression, and of figuring out who you are after dealing with something traumatic, are all incredibly spot on. The descriptions made me, and I believe they will make other readers, feel something. The writing was beautiful, and accurately described some of the emotions that people would feel if they were in a similar situation or in a similar place emotionally/mentally to these characters. While I’m on the topic of the descriptions I feel like I should mention that the writing is great across the board, the author doesn’t just nail emotional descriptions, he also creates beautiful imagery throughout the story that makes it so easy to visualize everything that is going on. The characters feel real, and I think I would be saying that even if it wasn’t for how easy it was to connect with them emotionally.

    One thing that really surprised me about this story was the content of it. While dealing with so many difficult things and so much emotional representation, this book was also just super sweet and super funny. While I was reading the book, I first thought that the author bit off more than he could chew. I liked so many different aspects of this story individually and was struggling to understand how everything would fit together without feeling completely tacky. Thankfully at the end of the novel everything comes together really well, and it just becomes a relatively accurate representation of how sometimes life has a funny way of working out exactly how you need it too. And I just want to stress that this isn’t even done in a conventional/obvious way that frequently happens in books where everything all works out. It’s messy, and weird, and a little confusing but most importantly it just all feels so natural when it all falls into place. Part of me wants to say that the real life aspect of this book was distracting from what could have been a more detailed journey of the mental/emotional effects of dealing with the things dealt with in this book, but I think that was just my own personal preference, because I’m not sure that was the point of this story. BUT that being said some of the deep introspective parts of this book that resonated with me felt out of place due to the light tone of things going on despite what the MC was dealing with. It was just a weird balance of the two, it managed to feel accurate and inaccurate at the same time.

    My only issue with the story was the love aspect of it. I really cannot go into details without spoiling anything, so despite my best attempts at a spoiler free review, I’ll have to put this section under a spoiler tag.

    Overall this is a pretty good story with a pretty good message. I think it’s worth it for anyone to read and form their own opinion on. There is a lot to like and respect here, and after reading this novel I’ll definitely be keeping an eye out to see if the author has any other stories planned.

  • Bruna Miranda

    **I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review**

    3,5 - Tess Fowler just lost her boyfriend. Her online boyfriend. They've met a few months back in a house party and stayed in touch a

    **I received this ARC in exchange for an honest review**

    3,5 - Tess Fowler just lost her boyfriend. Her online boyfriend. They've met a few months back in a house party and stayed in touch and had plans to be together IRL. However, after a week without hearing from Jonah she finds out through his Facebook page he's committed suicide.

    In shock, Tess drops out of high school to live with her dad - who's now running a funeral business after many unsuccessful attempts. Not long after she receives a message. From Jonah's profile.

    First things first: the writing is beautiful and catchy. It was a bit faster than I expected - sometimes the story advanced a lot in a few paragraphs, however it didn't feel rushed, only a different pace than I expected.

    I really enjoyed how the author tried to show all the stages of grief and how many different ways we can deal with death. To some, it's natural and should be seen as such with grace (hence the character's name, I assume), others just can't handle it. As someone who has a lot of issues talking about death, I felt acknowledged and comfortable enough to keep reading.

    At first, how Daniel comes into the story seemed too weird and unrealistic - his connection with Jonah/Tess is still a bit odd to me, but maybe it's just my lack of awareness of how many ways you can love someone. I feel that

    is about death, of course, but about love: how do you love someone after they're gone? Should you stop or is there a way to keep that love true?

    I really, really liked Tess. She's sarcastic and unapologetic as I would expect - I particularly enjoyed seeing her being "overly" sarcastic in some situations because that's her comfort zone and trying to sound "funny" was a mechanism of trying to go back to that. Despite of how he entered the story, I feel more connected to Daniel than Jonah. Even though he (Jonah) is a major part of it all, most of what we see is other people's opinions on him.

    As someone dealing with depression and other mental health issues, I did have some concerns about a comment or another that I'll probably go back and forth if I'm okay with it or not, but I see why they were there and why the author chose to portrait all of it to create a bigger picture.

    What kept me from giving it a higher rating: the last 30% of the novel seemed a bit rushed - now it wasn't just the writing. The events happened so fast I found myself going back to check if I was caught in it all. Even though explained within the story, it was a tad unrealistic.

    , I would recommend it to whoever enjoys sick-lits, a good writing style, and a new perceptive on death and mourning. :)

  • Korrina  (OwlCrate)

    "The way I see it, we have a bunch of imperfect moments all lined up, one after the next, and we feel this strange, imperfect love. Then, before we know it, it's all over. We give everything we have, but that can never be enough to make things just the way we want them, or to keep someone with us as long as we'd like. But the struggle is worth something. And the love is worth something even though it's imperfect. And maybe we should try to celebrate this brief, incomplete thing we've been given.

    "The way I see it, we have a bunch of imperfect moments all lined up, one after the next, and we feel this strange, imperfect love. Then, before we know it, it's all over. We give everything we have, but that can never be enough to make things just the way we want them, or to keep someone with us as long as we'd like. But the struggle is worth something. And the love is worth something even though it's imperfect. And maybe we should try to celebrate this brief, incomplete thing we've been given. Maybe that's all we can do when we find ourselves in the dark."

  • Whitney Atkinson

    My grandma's library gave this to her for free and she passed it on to me, and I figured I would never read it because I haven't been a fan of YA contemporary for years, but I was pleasantly surprised! I picked this up because it said it would appeal to fans of I'll Give You The Sun, which is one of my favorite contemporaries of all time back when I read the genre a lot. I started this on a whim not knowing if I'd actually get into and if I should just pass it along, but the narrator and the ton

    My grandma's library gave this to her for free and she passed it on to me, and I figured I would never read it because I haven't been a fan of YA contemporary for years, but I was pleasantly surprised! I picked this up because it said it would appeal to fans of I'll Give You The Sun, which is one of my favorite contemporaries of all time back when I read the genre a lot. I started this on a whim not knowing if I'd actually get into and if I should just pass it along, but the narrator and the tone of the novel sucked me in. It's a story about grief and recovery from losing someone close to you, which I can't relate to, but the main character struggled a lot from anxiety and depression and using humor as a coping mechanism, which is something I COULD relate to. There were passages in this that just made me stop and go, "Whoa. That's me." And that hasn't happened in a long time.

    I loved the main character of this book, Tess. I thought her fight to overcome her grief was valiant, and her choices felt justified and fleshed out. Her personality was very take-no-bullshit, which I appreciated. It's about a girl who's mourning, but she's not just wallowing in her own self-pity.

    The reason why I took a star off is because I was questioning how realistic it could be. For this to be my only complaint is a massive feat, though. It started out small with just bits of dialogue seeming pretentious and rude for a 17 year-old, a snarkiness that left a bitter taste in my mouth. Then, I began questioning some instalove aspects which I can't really go into without spoiling. Lastly, I think her road to recovery was a bit expedited, and I think a more defined explanation of her battle with mental health issues was needed, because in this book it seemed to recover pretty organically and I was hesitant at how plausible that would be after just a few weeks.

    Nevertheless, I would definitely recommend this. It made me laugh out loud at certain points, which rarely, RARELY happens.

  • Joce (squibblesreads)

    DNF. Underdeveloped and writing style had no specificity to it. You can really say so much by using the right specific verb at the right time and the word choices seemed so vague across the board which elicited way less emotion that I needed this to. I would read two paragraphs and they would add absolutely nothing in terms of tone, volume, plot, character arc. And it wasn’t a “quiet” book in style that I usually enjoy. It was just off. The author also didn’t seem to have a character sketch of o

    DNF. Underdeveloped and writing style had no specificity to it. You can really say so much by using the right specific verb at the right time and the word choices seemed so vague across the board which elicited way less emotion that I needed this to. I would read two paragraphs and they would add absolutely nothing in terms of tone, volume, plot, character arc. And it wasn’t a “quiet” book in style that I usually enjoy. It was just off. The author also didn’t seem to have a character sketch of our protagonist and the characterization seemed... off and never really took shape? I read this at a time when I was grieving myself and I DNFed it, feeling more irritated than empathized with.

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