Birding Without Borders: An Obsession, a Quest, and the Biggest Year in the World by Noah Strycker

Birding Without Borders: An Obsession, a Quest, and the Biggest Year in the World

Traveling to 41 countries in 2015 with a backpack and binoculars, Noah Strycker became the first person to see more than half the world’s 10,000 species of birds in one year. In 2015, Noah Strycker set himself a lofty goal: to become the first person to see half the world’s birds in one year. For 365 days, with a backpack, binoculars, and a series of one-way tickets, he tr...

Title:Birding Without Borders: An Obsession, a Quest, and the Biggest Year in the World
Author:
Rating:

Birding Without Borders: An Obsession, a Quest, and the Biggest Year in the World Reviews

  • Victoria Peipert

    Fascinating story! As a very casual bird watcher and nature enthusiast the story in this book intrigued me. It was engaging and was hard to put down since I was dying to know how everything would turn out at the end of the year. -1 star for the editing - it could have been stronger.

  • David Holtzclaw

    This is a delightful account of Mr. Stryker's journey & record breaking bird count. Even if you're not a birder, this is totally enjoyable & makes me want to buy some new binoculars to hit the trail.

  • Alison

    In 2015 the author traveled through 41 countries and 7 continents on his quest to find 5,000 birds in a year long journey.

    I have definitely become an armchair birder as I love reading about peoples journeys to track birds, and also watch the ones that live around me. This was a really informative and fun book to read, as it gives us the mindset of a person with a passion to achieve a goal, and not only that of the author, but other birders with as much love of this recreational activity, and wh

    In 2015 the author traveled through 41 countries and 7 continents on his quest to find 5,000 birds in a year long journey.

    I have definitely become an armchair birder as I love reading about peoples journeys to track birds, and also watch the ones that live around me. This was a really informative and fun book to read, as it gives us the mindset of a person with a passion to achieve a goal, and not only that of the author, but other birders with as much love of this recreational activity, and what made them get into it.

    Before the author left on his year long quest, he had a lot of preparations to do, from one way plane tickets, to searching out birders in each place that he was going, for the company and for the knowledge of the areas that these people could provide. He was so grateful for the interest of so many on making his trip memorable. One can feel what a tight group birders are. He had many exciting adventures along the way and he loved to stay as locally as he could to absorb the whole experience of the areas he visited.

    This is a book that even if you are not a birder you could appreciate, it is a wonderful travel memoir.

    I would like to thank NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC of this book.

  • Viva

    I'm a backyard birder and I quite looked forward to this book. Unfortunately it's hard to read. I feel bad for my rating, I commend this guy on writing a book on what he loves and I want him to succeed. But I don't think he's a natural writer and he might need a good editor.

    It says on the back "this is no travelogue or glorified checklist". Funny but I think it would have been better for the reader if it had been either as those were the parts I liked. His travel anecdotes were amusing and there

    I'm a backyard birder and I quite looked forward to this book. Unfortunately it's hard to read. I feel bad for my rating, I commend this guy on writing a book on what he loves and I want him to succeed. But I don't think he's a natural writer and he might need a good editor.

    It says on the back "this is no travelogue or glorified checklist". Funny but I think it would have been better for the reader if it had been either as those were the parts I liked. His travel anecdotes were amusing and there is a species checklist with date and location on the back!

    For the rest, some of it was just boring and some meandering and it's not pieced together well. This book is best read piecemeal, looking up passages on the birds or countries you are interested in. In any case, my best wishes for him and his hobby. The 2 star rating according to GoodReads = it was ok and I felt this was an ok book for me.

    I got this book as a free ARC.

  • Dennis Winge

    Noah wrote an excellent account of his big year in setting the record for most bird species seen in a single calendar year. He presents a nice overview on his strategy to set the record and then provides a compelling travelogue on his travels and importantly his uses of local birding experts to accomplish his goal. The role these various local guides provide in his quest is incredible and Noah gives them great credit for their guidance. It is impressive to read about an individual who sets a lof

    Noah wrote an excellent account of his big year in setting the record for most bird species seen in a single calendar year. He presents a nice overview on his strategy to set the record and then provides a compelling travelogue on his travels and importantly his uses of local birding experts to accomplish his goal. The role these various local guides provide in his quest is incredible and Noah gives them great credit for their guidance. It is impressive to read about an individual who sets a lofty goal and then follows a well-honed strategy to achieve it. Noah is an inspiration as he had to move through fatique and illness to achieve his goal. Although the books is about birds, it is also a testimony about the unfolding of one's passion toward achieving a goal. This was an outstanding read. I first learned about Noah when he was the featured guest at the Salt Lake Bird Festival and we heard his presentation on his big year. That captivated me to want to read his book and I enjoyed the book as much as his lecture. One notable aspect is his humility and clear acknowledgement of others. Great job Noah!

  • Erika

    I've read a lot of birding narratives, and this one is a must have. With exquisite attention to detail and the people he travelled with, Noah Strycker takes birders on a whirlwind tour of the globe's best birding locations. "But I read the blog about his trip on Audubon," some say. Me too, but this book pulls it altogether beautifully, including a great deal more detail and reflection. When I try to explain to someone new why I love birding, I'm going to recommend this book.

  • Suzanne

    Loved it! This is a fantastic complement to the blog Noah wrote while on his global Big Year, and it adds more about the many local people he met along the way and the situations he found himself in. I'm so impressed that such a brilliant birder also has such super writing skills. It's a page turner.

  • kglibrarian

    Loved this! So many fascinating details about his time exploring different countries and their birds. As a casual bird watcher I’m now determined to get a pair of binoculars and take it to the next level.

  • Paulette

    If you love birds and you love adventures, this is the book for you. Noah Strycker spent a year of his life to see if he could see half of the world's species of birds. From Antarctica to Argentina to Africa to India to Taiwan, etcetera, etcetera, Noah with the help of international fellow bird lovers met his goal and then some. I found his narrative very interesting and was glad it was not a diary day by day overdetailed account. He comments on issues along the way, all to do with birders, the

    If you love birds and you love adventures, this is the book for you. Noah Strycker spent a year of his life to see if he could see half of the world's species of birds. From Antarctica to Argentina to Africa to India to Taiwan, etcetera, etcetera, Noah with the help of international fellow bird lovers met his goal and then some. I found his narrative very interesting and was glad it was not a diary day by day overdetailed account. He comments on issues along the way, all to do with birders, the companionship and friendships he formed over his months nation-hopping...He mentions the logistics of his travels ($2,000 on visas alone!) And his book lists all the guidebooks he had scanned to take with him on an e-reader, and all the equipment he took with him--he traveled light, to say the least! My only minor criticism is that I would have liked to read more details about more birds. Clearly he could not go into details on all 6,ooo+ birds he saw, but I would have liked to learn more specifics about some of the unique creatures he encountered, to include the Harpy Eagle and the Flame-Crowned Flowerpecker. There were some photos in the book, but I wanted more, especially of the birds. I mean, he saw over 6,000! What is in this book hardly makes a dent! I am hoping this birder will follow up with another book, focused entirely on those lovely creatures he visited all year. I do recommend reading it, for both bird lovers and for those who just love to read about adventures in nature.

  • Ken

    What a wonderful book. But, I am biased. I was lucky enough to have been at the Magee Marsh Wildlife Area's Boardwalk on NW Ohio last spring in May for the spring migration. Noah was visiting that area and was on the Boardwalk. A friend and I got to talk with him for a little while. He was very nice to all the birders who wanted to talk with him even though he was mobbed. Birders come from all over the world to visit NW Ohio for the spring migration. The warblers can be seen at incredibly close

    What a wonderful book. But, I am biased. I was lucky enough to have been at the Magee Marsh Wildlife Area's Boardwalk on NW Ohio last spring in May for the spring migration. Noah was visiting that area and was on the Boardwalk. A friend and I got to talk with him for a little while. He was very nice to all the birders who wanted to talk with him even though he was mobbed. Birders come from all over the world to visit NW Ohio for the spring migration. The warblers can be seen at incredibly close range because they are only interested in feeding, pairing up and resting for their flight across Lake Erie.

    Yes - I enjoyed this book because I am a birder. But, what I really enjoyed was how Noah made an effort to do his Big World Year by almost exclusively using local birders for help. He could have used tour companies and avoided the locals. But, instead, he embraced them and shared his experiences as they shared their local birding patches with him. And, he tries to give credit to a great many of the people who helped him in his book.

    I also enjoyed how Noah wasn't just after a big number for the year. He wanted to visit places that meant something to him. He could have tallied more birds by not going to Antarctica and spending that time elsewhere in more birdy locations. But, he had spent time there as a researcher (see his penguin book); so, he wanted to start his journey there. (I also recommend his penguin book, especially if you are thinking about a career in wildlife research.)

Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.