Take Three Girls by Cath Crowley

Take Three Girls

"This beautifully crafted, lively novel captures the good and the bad of female friendship" Bec Kavanagh Books + Publishing, 5 stars. 3 award-winning authors.1 compelling book. ADY - not the confident A-Lister she appears to be.KATE - brainy boarder taking risks to pursue the music she loves.CLEM - disenchanted swim-star losing her heart to the wrong boy.All are targeted b...

Title:Take Three Girls
Author:
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Edition Language:English

Take Three Girls Reviews

  • Amanda

    Four years ago, on the now defunct podcast Ladies of YA, I interviewed Fiona Wood and she let slip that she, Cath Crowley, and Simmone Howell were working on a book together. I have been eagerly anticipated that book since that day. Finally receiving an ARC of

    , a book coauthored by my three favourite authors, was a dream come true. To say I love this book would be an understatement because I love it with ALL my heart.

    Sixteen-year-olds Clem, Kate, and Ady are in Year 10 at St H

    Four years ago, on the now defunct podcast Ladies of YA, I interviewed Fiona Wood and she let slip that she, Cath Crowley, and Simmone Howell were working on a book together. I have been eagerly anticipated that book since that day. Finally receiving an ARC of

    , a book coauthored by my three favourite authors, was a dream come true. To say I love this book would be an understatement because I love it with ALL my heart.

    Sixteen-year-olds Clem, Kate, and Ady are in Year 10 at St Hilda's, a private girls school in Melbourne. Clem and Kate are boarders, but Ady is a day girl. Clem, a competitive swimmer was forced to board after her parents relocated to Singapore for work. She chose not to room with her twin sister Iris. Kate, a passionate cellist, has left her country home to try and get a scholarship so she can study medicine and not be such a burden on her parents' finances. She winds up rooming with Iris, both of them studious and serious. Ady loves fashion and art, and now dreams of becoming a costume designer. Her parents are fighting non-stop, and she's tiring of her friends and their judgemental ways. The three girls are thrown together in a new initiative at school, and they find the friendship they've all been unknowingly searching for.

    Told from three perspectives, I was instantly hooked by the voices of Clem, Kate, and Ady. Each girl so different, yet also sharing similar qualities, insecurities and fears. All three of them have problems they try to avoid, despite knowing they need to eventually deal with them. They were well developed, and as the story went on, their histories and personalities were revealed in depth.

    An accident forced Clem to stop swimming and now that she can return to her former pastime, she finds she's not really bothered about it. She's also struggling with how her body has changed in the six weeks since she stopped training. She's conscious of the weight she's gained and finds herself fixated on food. And Stu, he boy who bumped into her, causing her to break her wrist. She falls head over heels for him; her crush was sweet and naive.

    Kate knows she's lucky to be attending such a good school, one that will hopefully keep her from having to return to her small town, even though she loves her family home. She dreams of becoming a musician and enjoys experimenting with sampling songs and playing over them on her cello. She finds Oliver, a fellow cello player in the orchestra, incredibly annoying, but watching them slowly get to know each other was such a delight. Kate's torn between doing what she feels is right and doing what her heart desires.

    Ady is creative and observant. She's slowly becoming aware that she's tired of playing games and being fake, something she's had to do with her group of friends. She's also not into her boyfriend Rupert, even though she feels as though she should be, instead she later finds herself attracted to a girl named Max, someone she meets through Kate. Ady's also dealing with the guilt that she and her siblings are the reason her father is an alcoholic and coke addict, but she's determined to play it cool and not talk to anyone about her home life.

    I made so many notes in regards to pop cultural references, whether it was art or music, as well as places the girls go. I loved the layers to each character and finding out all the little details that influence their lives.

    The story tackles a lot of subjects including bullying, feminism, sexism, addiction, sexuality, friendship, and first loves. It looks at them realistically and sensitively and in a way that's totally relatable for teens. It's so relevant to the social issues in our world right now, and I hope that it's picked up by teenagers and their parents.

    crazy, fuckwit, dumb, lame.

    is a touching, funny, beautiful story, one that is sure to appeal to readers of all ages. It made me nostalgic for my teenage years while at the same time speaking to me as a woman in her thirties. I love the characters, I love the setting, I love the issues, I LOVE THIS BOOK. I cannot wait to reread it when the finished version is in stores!

    Thank you to PanMacmillan for the ARC.

    ________________________________

    It's been 3 years since this collaboration was first announced, and now the 2017 release is so close!

  • Diem

    , a definite keeper and a novel I will be recommending everyone.

    I spent around 2 hours reading from the story out loud to my friends today - my throat is a teensy bit sore but my heart is so full.

    Also, OLIVER. OLIVER. OLIVER.

    I can't wait for September to arrive because even though I'm reading the uncorrected proof copy, and I can see what needs fixing up, it's amazing. It's everything I could have wished for and more.

    This isn't a light hearted b

    , a definite keeper and a novel I will be recommending everyone.

    I spent around 2 hours reading from the story out loud to my friends today - my throat is a teensy bit sore but my heart is so full.

    Also, OLIVER. OLIVER. OLIVER.

    I can't wait for September to arrive because even though I'm reading the uncorrected proof copy, and I can see what needs fixing up, it's amazing. It's everything I could have wished for and more.

    This isn't a light hearted book, it deals with issues. Lots of different issues. So make sure to manage your expectations when you start reading the book!

  • Marla Mei

    OMG THIS IS GOING TO BE THE BEST COLLABORATION OF 2017!!!! Three of my fave Aussie authors writing a book together???

  • Kelly (Diva Booknerd)

    Gather your girl gang and fight the patriarchy!

    The private boarding school of Saint Hilda's promotes excellence in academic pursuits so when a website begins to engage in targeted student abuse, the prestigious school begins a Wellness initiative to promote well being and self reflection. The Private School Secrets Tracker website engages in defamation to humiliates female students, sharing personal information and encouraging concealed users to engage in abuse. Young women defined by their bodi

    Gather your girl gang and fight the patriarchy!

    The private boarding school of Saint Hilda's promotes excellence in academic pursuits so when a website begins to engage in targeted student abuse, the prestigious school begins a Wellness initiative to promote well being and self reflection. The Private School Secrets Tracker website engages in defamation to humiliates female students, sharing personal information and encouraging concealed users to engage in abuse. Young women defined by their bodies, sexuality and social standing.

    The improbable companionship between Kate, Clementine and Adelaide is wonderful. Kate is an astute and enthusiastic music student and although wistful, Kate relies upon her scholarship to attend school. Adelaide is an extrovert who is often callous and judgemental, enduring her father's addiction and dissolution of marriage while exploring a bisexual relationship. Clementine is a former athlete rediscovering her personal identity and navigating her first sexual relationship. Her relationship with sister Iris has surpassed the boundaries of sibling rivalry and often socially isolated one another.

    The Private School Secrets Tracker degrades female adolescents and the societal and psychological and ramifications are disquieting. I enjoyed the discussion of the toxicity of online communities. The website was incredibly confronting and reminiscent of the online abuse women on social media experience consistently. Take Three Girls reinforces the significance of female solidarity and empowerment, encouraged by the Wellness initiative as part of the school curriculum in response to the toxic, damaging website.

    Take Three Girls is a journey of discovery, identity and acceptance. I enjoyed the journal aspects throughout the storyline, each narrative examining how rumour and innuendo influences our mental wellness, confidence and self esteem. Beautifully written, significant and empowering.

    Wouldn't we just.

  • Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    This review was originally posted on

    . Check it out for more reviews!

    It’s easy for online trolls to hide behind the anonymity of the internet, but when you know it’s someone at school, it makes it even harder to get away from.

    At this private girls school, cyber bullying is addressed through Wellness class, which inspires positive self reflection. Told through lesson plans, excerpts from the PSST website, and diary entries from each of three main characters – you can almost pictu

    This review was originally posted on

    . Check it out for more reviews!

    It’s easy for online trolls to hide behind the anonymity of the internet, but when you know it’s someone at school, it makes it even harder to get away from.

    At this private girls school, cyber bullying is addressed through Wellness class, which inspires positive self reflection. Told through lesson plans, excerpts from the PSST website, and diary entries from each of three main characters – you can almost picture this happening at any high school.

    I loved how Take Three Girls deals throws the notion of perfection out the window. On the surface, it follows three talented girls who have achieved a lot, and appear to have their futures set out for them. Clem is a swimming superstar, Kate is a talented cello player, and Ady has an eye for fashion design. But as you get to know them through their own perspectives and through the other girls, you discover that they’re just like us, with their own hopes, dreams, worries and fears.

    By looking beneath the surface, we find out what they’re really dealing with. From sibling rivalry, to family substance abuse, secret talents and hidden kisses, there’s a lot more going on here behind the scenes. All this is going on with the misogynist website PSST watching in the sidelines – ready to post about any slip up. Although I guessed who the culprit was early on, it was still an intriguing read with many lessons to be learnt along the way.

    These three girls each learn their own lessons in life – about finding out who their real friends are. About pursuing your own talents and dreams without trying to please others. About being able to make mistakes, in love and in life, but also falling back on your own two feet and going where life takes you. I loved Clem’s naivety, Kate’s braininess and Ady’s penchant for detail. It’s these quirks that made them feel so real and relatable.

    I also loved how Take Three Girls dealt with female empowerment through friendship. As Ady learns, it’s not about competing with each other, showing off, or trying to get on top of the pecking order. It’s about loving and accepting each other for who you are, supporting each other through your weak spots, and also just learning to listen and understand. There’s a heavy dose of feminism, with an apt contrast between how guys felt about the misogyny on PSST (taking it as a joke) and how demeaning the women found it.

    Part of high school for some teenagers is also to discover falling in love, pursuing crushes, and having sex for the first time. Each of these girls experience different types of romantic relationships, including bisexuality and sexual fluidity.

    Take Three Girls is an empowering feminist read, with friendship, self-reflection and growth at its heart. Told in such a refreshing and heart warming way, it still manages to remain warm and fuzzy despite some of the heavier topics. It’s a wonderful #LoveOzYA book about friendship, feminism, and self-discovery, which I really enjoyed!

  • Paula Weston

    I first heard that Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell and Fiona Wood were writing a book together around two years ago. I was so excited - they are three of my favourite writers - and I marvelled that they were able to collaborate while working simultaneously on individual projects.

    The end result is a brilliant book. It would be well crafted if it was written by a single author, but the fact it has three creators makes it even more impressive. It reads seamlessly, and I love how the three girls’ stori

    I first heard that Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell and Fiona Wood were writing a book together around two years ago. I was so excited - they are three of my favourite writers - and I marvelled that they were able to collaborate while working simultaneously on individual projects.

    The end result is a brilliant book. It would be well crafted if it was written by a single author, but the fact it has three creators makes it even more impressive. It reads seamlessly, and I love how the three girls’ stories intertwine so cleverly.

    As you’d expect, the writing is sublime, the characters nuanced and the plot engaging. And the topic of cyber bullying has never been more timely, with another tragic teen death recently here in Australia following online abuse. In Take Three Girls, the PSST posts and comments are brutal and obscene and are a reminder of how insidious online trolls can be behind their facade of anonymity.

    But Take Three Girls also has a wonderful a sense of fun, a love of life and celebrates the power of honest friendship. Clem, Ady and Kate are real. They swear, they make bad choices, they misjudge family and friends…and they learn how to be true to themselves.

    The construct of the Wellness Journal also works beautifully, with its thought provoking prompts at the beginning of each ‘week'. The book handles positive messaging around self esteem, body image and feminism without being heavy handed, and could easily double as a useful resource for readers.

    This is novel that will spark important conversations. It’s also a cracking read. :)

    Highly recommended

  • Casey

    Take Three Girls is a book that made my heart so happy whilst dealing with some real issues. I saw so much of my own highschool in this story and while it was enraging to see all the online bullying and slut shaming it’s all unfortunately just apart of highschool. It would be cool if everyone was nice and educated but it takes time, and perhaps it takes three girls to

    Take Three Girls is a book that made my heart so happy whilst dealing with some real issues. I saw so much of my own highschool in this story and while it was enraging to see all the online bullying and slut shaming it’s all unfortunately just apart of highschool. It would be cool if everyone was nice and educated but it takes time, and perhaps it takes three girls to change the ways things are, even for a little bit.

    Three Girls who seemingly only have the same school in common are forced to buddy up for Wellness class based on the size of their thumbs and not much else. One a star swimmer who doesn’t want to swim, another an A+ student looking for a scholarship and faced with giving up her passion of music to pursue a career of medicine, the third a popular girl sick of the hate and slander and feeling the weight of her family press down on her shoulders.

    A country girl living in the dorms of school, A+ student working hard for a scholarship to ease some financial pressure off her parents she knows the safe route is to study hard and get into medical school but her hearts drawn to music, faced with a solid career path or to follow her passion she’s torn. Kate is soft, nice, and an all round amazing human who I’d love to be friends with.

    A twin without the super close relationship that is assumed comes with all twins, known for her swimming talents everyone has set expectations of her and she’s sick of them. Clem was one of my favourite characters dealing with the unknowns of what she really wants to do with life, she’s sex positive as well as having self-image issues stemmed from idealistic body standards and bullying. She’s rash but her journey and character arc was my favourite.

    A kick ass girl whose a marshmallow under it all. Ady isn’t the best student, doesn’t have the nicest of friends and can be a bitch with the rest of them but aren’t we all. Ady’s family is falling apart, she’s sick of her boyfriend, wants more out of her friend group, and has amazing dreams, she just needs a jump to kickstart the rest of her life.

    It’s so hard to put these three character’s story into a review, there is just so much depth to each and every one of the characters I want to include all 400 pages of awesomeness so you can see for yourselves. I can’t wait for everyone to read about them and fall in love with them as much as I did.

    This story is essentially about the power of friendship, the support of teens, and kicking misogynist asses, also kissing.

    If you’re looking for three kick ass unlikely friends all with different dreams and aspirations just within their grasp, lifting each other up to reach them then this is the book for you.

    Hey even if you’re just looking for some soft boys and a swoon worthy w/w relationship Take Three Girls is it.

  • Taneika

    I received this book for free from Pan Macmillan Australia in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    When I first heard about this, I was so incredibly excited to get my hands on it as not only is it written by three incredible #LoveOzYA authors, but it tackles feminism, identity, bullying and friendship!

    Take Three Girls follows three girls (funnily enough) named Ady, Clem and Kate as they go through Year 10 at an all girls school i

    I received this book for free from Pan Macmillan Australia in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    When I first heard about this, I was so incredibly excited to get my hands on it as not only is it written by three incredible #LoveOzYA authors, but it tackles feminism, identity, bullying and friendship!

    Take Three Girls follows three girls (funnily enough) named Ady, Clem and Kate as they go through Year 10 at an all girls school in Melbourne. Ady is a day student who is part of the popular crowd, but we see her questioning popularity and her relationships. She also has a shitty home life that she keeps utmost secret. Clem is one of the boarders and a member of the school swim team, until she ends up taking time off for an injury and realises that swimming is not all of who she is as a person while getting involved with the wrong boy. Another one of the boarders, Kate, is not only incredibly intelligent, but incredibly in love with music. She plays the cello and starts to discover that your dreams can change. Ady, Clem and Kate all end up bonding after each becoming victim to vicious rumours spread by a student run gossip site and we get to see their friendship with eachother develop while learning more about each of them as people.

    The rest of this review is up on my blog here:

  • Rachel Lightwood

    Well, I did not expect to like this, let alone

    it.

  • RavenclawReadingRoom

    Trigger warnings: misogyny, slut shaming, fat shaming, homophobia, drug/alcohol addiction.

    I've been excited about this since I heard the authors reading an excerpt from it at the 2016 YA Showcase at the State Library in December of last year. So I may have squeed more than a little when I saw it for sale at the shop at the Melbourne Writers Festival over the weekend. And I read it pretty much straight away, because reasons.

    This follows the story of three teenage girls at a snooty private school

    Trigger warnings: misogyny, slut shaming, fat shaming, homophobia, drug/alcohol addiction.

    I've been excited about this since I heard the authors reading an excerpt from it at the 2016 YA Showcase at the State Library in December of last year. So I may have squeed more than a little when I saw it for sale at the shop at the Melbourne Writers Festival over the weekend. And I read it pretty much straight away, because reasons.

    This follows the story of three teenage girls at a snooty private school in Melbourne. Ady is dealing with her parents fighting constantly, with her father being out of work, and with her friends...not being particularly friendly. Clem is a former swimmer who isn't sure who she is after an injury. She's also not sure how she feels about her twin sister, Iris. And Kate is the quiet, studious country girl who wants nothing more than to make amazing cutting edge music on her cello.

    The three girls are forced together by a wellness/positive education program at school, but they really start to bond over a godawful anonymous website dedicated to slut shaming and secret sharing girls at the local private schools.

    As someone who spends 40 hours a week around 16 year old girls, this is pretty damned accurate. As someone who spends 40 hours a week in a place that emphasises the importance of positive education, the reaction the students have to the program (groans, mostly) is authentic.

    There are friendship dramas, relationship dramas, family dramas, inappropriate relationships, and a whole host of feminism, female empowerment, and humour. I loved all three characters, although Kate's story is probably the one I related to the most of the three. I loved that it's not a conclusive, definitive ending. And I loved just how very Melbourne it is. BRB, shoving this book at teenagers.

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