Agatha Raisin and the Witches' Tree by M.C. Beaton

Agatha Raisin and the Witches' Tree

The Witches’ Tree continues the tradition in M. C. Beaton's beloved Agatha Raisin mystery series―now a hit T.V. show.Cotswolds inhabitants are used to inclement weather, but the night sky is especially foggy as Rory and Molly Devere, the new vicar and his wife, drive slowly home from a dinner party in their village of Sumpton Harcourt. They strain to see the road ahead―and...

Title:Agatha Raisin and the Witches' Tree
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Agatha Raisin and the Witches' Tree Reviews

  • Malia

    Another little caper with my old friend Agatha. I do wish there were a little progress in the characters' personal lives after 28 books, but all in all, I enjoyed it.

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  • Charlotte Miller

    It is entirely M. C. Beaton’s fault that I am sleep-deprived today, for I was up half the night reading The Witches’ Tree, the 28th volume in the magnificent Agatha Raisin series. Full of twists and turns, and the charming and ever-irascible Agatha, The Witches’ Tree is a must read for mystery fans. If you haven’t met the unforgettable Agatha yet, you really should. This is a fantastic series, and The Witches’ Tree is one of M. C. Beaton’s best.

    (Advance Reading Copy obtained by request from Net

    It is entirely M. C. Beaton’s fault that I am sleep-deprived today, for I was up half the night reading The Witches’ Tree, the 28th volume in the magnificent Agatha Raisin series. Full of twists and turns, and the charming and ever-irascible Agatha, The Witches’ Tree is a must read for mystery fans. If you haven’t met the unforgettable Agatha yet, you really should. This is a fantastic series, and The Witches’ Tree is one of M. C. Beaton’s best.

    (Advance Reading Copy obtained by request from NetGalley.)

  • OutlawPoet

    Okay, here’s my confession…

    I want Agatha and Charles to get married and have a Happily Ever After.

    I loved this latest entry in the Agatha Raisin series. The Witches Tree has a great mystery, some truly devious crimes, and it’s just pure fun.

    Agatha is maturing. She’s still Agatha (no worries), but in this book she’s becoming more the person her readers know she can be. And her relationship with Charles is getting interesting…in a swoon-worthy way.

    No worries – your favorite characters are there a

    Okay, here’s my confession…

    I want Agatha and Charles to get married and have a Happily Ever After.

    I loved this latest entry in the Agatha Raisin series. The Witches Tree has a great mystery, some truly devious crimes, and it’s just pure fun.

    Agatha is maturing. She’s still Agatha (no worries), but in this book she’s becoming more the person her readers know she can be. And her relationship with Charles is getting interesting…in a swoon-worthy way.

    No worries – your favorite characters are there and there’s still a lot of nasty under the ‘peaceful’ country exterior.

    A fast and fabulously fun read. And as a reminder, if you’re new to Agatha Raisin, you really can start anywhere. No need to go back to book 1.

    *ARC Provided via Net Galley

  • Nancy

    My thanks to Netgalley and the Publisher for an opportunity to read an advanced copy of this book.

    After the last book, ‘Pushing up Daisies’, I had hoped that MC Beaton has turned a corner and her Agatha Raisin series would get back to what they had previous been with multiple story lines that bounced back and forth effortlessly. Unfortunately, this book returned to the usual drivel that has become her norm.

    Fifty-three year old Agatha is in her usual depressed mood when there is no man in her lif

    My thanks to Netgalley and the Publisher for an opportunity to read an advanced copy of this book.

    After the last book, ‘Pushing up Daisies’, I had hoped that MC Beaton has turned a corner and her Agatha Raisin series would get back to what they had previous been with multiple story lines that bounced back and forth effortlessly. Unfortunately, this book returned to the usual drivel that has become her norm.

    Fifty-three year old Agatha is in her usual depressed mood when there is no man in her life and work is the usual boring assortment of missing pets, marital affairs and wayward teens. Agatha is still the “pet hate” for Wilkes since she tends to solve more crime by “bumbling about” then he does. Thus begins the tale of the Witches’ Tree when the body of Margaret Darby is found hanging from a tree that has a curious past.

    The story gets a bit twisted with several dead bodies, a coven, and a will that has gone through several revisions, but when it comes down to it, the village of Sumpton Harcourt has some very odd people not to mention too much affinity for Agatha Christy and romance novels.

    Things were touched on in the book, involving the wife of the new vicar, that I did not think belonged in a cozy mystery and I was rather surprised to see it brought up here. There were parts that did not seem to be fully addressed by the end of the book and characters that took up more room than they should have. Overall, if you have read the full series to this point, you would not be able to pass by a new Agatha, but if you are just staring out, I suggest that you start at the beginning and develop you own love for the people of Carsley.

  • Nicole

    The Witches' Tree, the 28th Agatha Raisin mystery by acclaimed author M.C. Beaton, is so well written that it doesn't matter if one hasn't read all the previous books in the series prior to this one. Personally, I'd only read the first (The Quiche of Death) but did see all the episodes of the television series. Other than the location and some of the characters, new readers to the series should not expect the same warm/fuzzy feeling from the television shows to be evident in the books. The story

    The Witches' Tree, the 28th Agatha Raisin mystery by acclaimed author M.C. Beaton, is so well written that it doesn't matter if one hasn't read all the previous books in the series prior to this one. Personally, I'd only read the first (The Quiche of Death) but did see all the episodes of the television series. Other than the location and some of the characters, new readers to the series should not expect the same warm/fuzzy feeling from the television shows to be evident in the books. The story is very enjoyable - it's a lovely combination of charming, spooky, amusing and it's also a little bit dark. Not one, but two bodies are found hanging from The Witches Tree in the small Cotswolds village of Sumpton Harcourt (near Carsely), and it's up to Agatha and her team to investigate and discover the culprit. There are lots of little behind the scenes antics as well (relationships between Agatha and James, and also between Agatha and Charles), and it does quite well as a standalone. The banter is quick and clever, and there is a little surprise in the epilogue as well. Highly, highly recommended!

  • Susan Johnson

    A character in this book moved to the Cotswolds solely because he wanted the Agatha Christie experience. It's really the Jane Marple experience of village life and he was trying to experience that. I realized that is one of the reasons I like this series so much. I too want to live in a little village with other little towns all 5-10 minutes apart and gorgeous scenery. And never a shortage of handsome men, just ask Agatha Raisin.

    I always am surprised she makes a living running a detective agenc

    A character in this book moved to the Cotswolds solely because he wanted the Agatha Christie experience. It's really the Jane Marple experience of village life and he was trying to experience that. I realized that is one of the reasons I like this series so much. I too want to live in a little village with other little towns all 5-10 minutes apart and gorgeous scenery. And never a shortage of handsome men, just ask Agatha Raisin.

    I always am surprised she makes a living running a detective agency with employees no less in the Cotswolds but she does. Apparently there are more things that need investigating than I envisioned and when people start dying right and left, Agatha investigates. There is one scene where she gets ties up with her assistant, Toni, that is laugh out loud hysterical.

    There is a witch's coven thrown in and a restaurant owner who dares to spit into Agatha's food. There is never a dull moment. Agatha even gets Charles out of a big mess in a very fun way. Who isn't rooting for Agatha and Charles to get together? I think they are better suited than James.

    It's another fun romp with Agatha that I enjoyed. Thanks to Net Galley for a copy of this enjoyable read.

  • Josephine (Jo)

    I was very grateful to goodreads giveaways and to M.C. Beaton for the chance to read this latest in the Agathat Raisin series!

    As usual I thoroughly enjoyed Agatha Raisin’s latest case! M.C. Beaton brings Agatha to life so well and I feel so many different emotions when I read about her. I sometimes want to shake her and tell her to grow up and stop throwing herself at her latest crush; I feel sorry for her because she is lonely and feels left on the shelf. Sometimes she is annoying and sometimes

    I was very grateful to goodreads giveaways and to M.C. Beaton for the chance to read this latest in the Agathat Raisin series!

    As usual I thoroughly enjoyed Agatha Raisin’s latest case! M.C. Beaton brings Agatha to life so well and I feel so many different emotions when I read about her. I sometimes want to shake her and tell her to grow up and stop throwing herself at her latest crush; I feel sorry for her because she is lonely and feels left on the shelf. Sometimes she is annoying and sometimes very funny. In this latest book Agatha is faced with several murders in a neighbouring village and although the local police are not very grateful for her ‘help’ she is on the track of some very nasty people and gets herself and her young female assistant into a very dangerous situation. Agatha comes face to face with some of the old village beliefs and some people who believe in witchcraft. Some of her ideas do backfire, but Agatha is nothing if not persistent and she keeps on their trail with great tenacity! I was annoyed with her long-time friend and sometimes lover Sir Charles Fraith, he really is a selfish man and treats Agatha’s home as a drop in centre where he can crash for the night if he wants to! Molly Harris, wife of the vicar of Sumpton Harcourt is definitely not what she seems to be: not at all like the ever patient and kind Mrs Bloxby, wife of the vicar of Carsely in the Cotswolds where Agatha has come to live after her busy life in London.

    These books are some of my favourite ones to pick up when I need to relax and enjoy a mystery that is not too stressful but really amusing and entertaining. I also love Ms. Beaton’s Hamish MacBeth books; they are just as entertaining and set in a peaceful Scottish village where, like Carsely there are a surprising number of crimes!

  • Claire Stoyle

    Well, what can I say - not up to the expected standard. The sentences were short, the story jumped from one thing to another - one minute someone was dead, and then he wasn't. Names of people had changed, and the continuity was all out of sync. I felt the story needed bulking out and I was reading the annotated version. There was also too much focus on the love life of poor Agatha instead of focusing on the juicy bits of the story. I felt this was a book written for the fans far too quickly, and

    Well, what can I say - not up to the expected standard. The sentences were short, the story jumped from one thing to another - one minute someone was dead, and then he wasn't. Names of people had changed, and the continuity was all out of sync. I felt the story needed bulking out and I was reading the annotated version. There was also too much focus on the love life of poor Agatha instead of focusing on the juicy bits of the story. I felt this was a book written for the fans far too quickly, and to order instead of a well thought out story that evolved over the pages. That being said, I did enjoy the antics of our dear Agatha, but as with the writing, I do think she is past her best. Cruel opinion maybe, but mine, and not necessarily that of the other fans.

  • The Flooze

    I remember a time when I eagerly devoured every Agatha Raisin story. I delighted in Aggie's abrasiveness, in the villagers' eccentricities, and in the ludicrously daft situations the characters found themselves in. It added up to intriguing, uncomplicated entertainment.

    Sadly, that's not the case any more. Riddled with inconsistencies, this installment cries out for a good line edit. Characters who have just packed themselves into a car are suddenly and magically storming out the vicarage door. N

    I remember a time when I eagerly devoured every Agatha Raisin story. I delighted in Aggie's abrasiveness, in the villagers' eccentricities, and in the ludicrously daft situations the characters found themselves in. It added up to intriguing, uncomplicated entertainment.

    Sadly, that's not the case any more. Riddled with inconsistencies, this installment cries out for a good line edit. Characters who have just packed themselves into a car are suddenly and magically storming out the vicarage door. Names are swapped around. Newly acquired clues are suddenly forgotten or are attributed to the wrong source. It's utterly distracting.

    Bringing this book down further is the unnatural dialogue. The conversations are short and sharp, yet they still manage to meander helter-skelter through topics.

    The mystery is bland. The Charles question has dragged on far too long. I'm infuriated by Simon's continued presence. I wish Bill played a larger role. And I desperately want Agatha to stop comparing herself to all women and swooning over every available man.

    Sorry, Agatha. We may not meet again. But if we do, I fervently hope it's after someone has given your prose a bit of tough love.

  • Deanna

    This is one of my few remaining light-reading series. I haven’t found it objectionably disappointing and deserted it deep into the series, like I have a bunch of others. And it’s one of the exceptions to 3-stars reflecting that I would have been happier reading something else, or at least that my positive expectations were significantly squashed.

    The vinegary, un-charming, age-anxious, man-obsessive, ferociously independent, lonely 50-something ex-PR-exec-turned PI-in-the-Cotswolds is a unique f

    This is one of my few remaining light-reading series. I haven’t found it objectionably disappointing and deserted it deep into the series, like I have a bunch of others. And it’s one of the exceptions to 3-stars reflecting that I would have been happier reading something else, or at least that my positive expectations were significantly squashed.

    The vinegary, un-charming, age-anxious, man-obsessive, ferociously independent, lonely 50-something ex-PR-exec-turned PI-in-the-Cotswolds is a unique fixture in mystery fiction and I always wonder what she is up to between books, so I keep coming back to them. I forgive them their flaws, because the anti-stereotype Agatha somehow soothes me.

    Agatha is bright, successful, clever, and powerful, but foolishly tripping her own flawed self up in ways that make us wince in recognition of all our personal proclivity to stupid-acting and better-judgement leaving.

    She has to have a man to embarrassingly obsess over, but in no way are these books in the romance genre thank you.

    She romps around cozy country and tea is a feature, but the gin-and-smokes Agatha is not a cozy heroine, thank you again.

    She’s a PI, sort of, but the series doesn’t fit the serious PI genre at all.

    The series is inherently whimsical and works at being funny, neither of which syncs up with my reading DNA, but somehow I’m not really put off by the whimsy, and even find myself genuinely amused at the humor at times. I’m a serious reader and take my mysteries seriously, but in this case I manage to be fine with the wink wink of it all.

    I don’t love the series but I do like it well enough, somehow manage to just enjoy it for what it is rather than fuming over what it isn’t. How is it that Agatha Raisin of all people brings out the zen in my reader soul?


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