Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector by Andy Hirsch

Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector

How well do you know our favorite furry companion? Did they really descend from wolves? What's the difference between a Chihuahua and a Saint Bernard? And just how smart are they? Join one friendly mutt on a journey to discover the secret origin of dogs, how genetics and evolution shape species, and where in the world his favorite ball bounced off to.Every volume of Scienc...

Title:Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector
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Edition Language:English

Science Comics: Dogs: From Predator to Protector Reviews

  • Carla Johnson-Hicks

    This is not just a graphic novel. Science comics are full of interesting information, detailed illustrations, use of topic and more. This particular one teaches about genetics, adaptations, breeding and evolution particularly with dogs.

    In this book we meet Rudy, a pet dog who visits the local dog park. Once there, he tries to play with his yellow ball. This ends up taking the reader through a history of canis lupus to canis familiaris. We meet several different breeds of dogs and how they came t

    This is not just a graphic novel. Science comics are full of interesting information, detailed illustrations, use of topic and more. This particular one teaches about genetics, adaptations, breeding and evolution particularly with dogs.

    In this book we meet Rudy, a pet dog who visits the local dog park. Once there, he tries to play with his yellow ball. This ends up taking the reader through a history of canis lupus to canis familiaris. We meet several different breeds of dogs and how they came to be using genetics, evolution and adaptations. There is a lot of scientific detail within these pages. There is a lot of scientific vocabulary that is explained in the story as well as in the extensive glossary at the end of the book. This book is geared to older children, I would suggest 10 and up. It is a fun way to describe the process of evolution using dogs. The graphics are fun as well as informative.

    This would be a great book to use when teaching about genetics, evolution, adaptations, natural selection, and breading. It should be in all libraries, school and public. It is a great resource to teach these topics in a fun way. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.

  • Suz

    Rudy (a dog), is the narrator of this volume in the Science Comics series. He tells us that he is a "canardly" - you can 'ardly tell what breed. While at the local dog park, Rudy chases his favorite ball into the past. He explains to readers how dogs evolved from wild predators to tame companions and protectors (and also looks for his lost ball). His explanation covers topics like Linnaeus, Mendel, Darwin, Punnett squares, DNA, nature and nurture, the gene pool, and pretty much anything else tha

    Rudy (a dog), is the narrator of this volume in the Science Comics series. He tells us that he is a "canardly" - you can 'ardly tell what breed. While at the local dog park, Rudy chases his favorite ball into the past. He explains to readers how dogs evolved from wild predators to tame companions and protectors (and also looks for his lost ball). His explanation covers topics like Linnaeus, Mendel, Darwin, Punnett squares, DNA, nature and nurture, the gene pool, and pretty much anything else that affects the adaptation of a species over time. Rudy gives examples of how a dog's senses work; the difference in what colors they can see compared to human eyesight, the way they can detect odors that are only 1 or 2 parts per trillion, or how far their hearing range extends. Breeds, dog shows, pedigrees, vocal communication and body language are all a part of Rudy's explanations. One fun fact he shares is that dogs and humans are two species that both continue to play even after they reach adult age.

    This series follows in the tradition of the Magic School Bus and the Max Axiom books by sharing science concepts through a graphic format. In this case, the comic style illustrations display the different time periods Rudy visits as he traces the evolution of dogs, and readers can also see his determination to retrieve his ball. There are plenty of facts, and also helpful features such as a glossary, a list of books for further reading. One last appearance by Rudy is similar to the bonus scenes that show up during a movie's end credits. He urges readers to consider pet adoption and find a companion to take into their home. This book is an excellent introduction to the history of domesticated dogs, and offers enough basic facts to give readers a good place to start researching the topic more deeply on their own.

    I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.

  • Jenny

    Just so you know, this review was not written by the human who normally posts stuff here. This review was written by her dog.

    Some of you may have enjoyed my previous review of _The Dog Master_, which made my tail wag. That’s right, humans, I’m back. I figured out the code to unlock the iPad and it has changed my life. This time I read a comic called Science Comics: Dogs. Man, I knew that was going to be a great book right when I saw the title. Because what topic could be more important than DOG

    Just so you know, this review was not written by the human who normally posts stuff here. This review was written by her dog.

    Some of you may have enjoyed my previous review of _The Dog Master_, which made my tail wag. That’s right, humans, I’m back. I figured out the code to unlock the iPad and it has changed my life. This time I read a comic called Science Comics: Dogs. Man, I knew that was going to be a great book right when I saw the title. Because what topic could be more important than DOGS? (Global warming, maybe, but you humans don’t seem interested enough in that, now do you?)

    Just in case you’re thinking this is “fake news,” let me remind you I’m a Border Collie, the most intelligent of dogs, and not only do I read, write, and post reviews, I also watch your Netflix when you’re at work. I mean, you don’t expect me to watch the dandelions grow all day while you’re gone, do you?

    So on to the book. Science Comics: Dogs is full of interesting details on everything about a dog’s life. From the way a dog smells (Did you know we have two smellers? I bet you didn’t!) to the way humans affect dog genetics and evolution, this book has it all. Rudy, the dog who is your guide, loves ball, just like I do, and he’ll help you travel back in time to witness early dog-human collaboration, take you to Russia to observe Silver Fox breeding experiments, and even show you dog DNA. My human is a science teacher and she would do well to buy this book for her classes because everything a middle school life science student needs to know is in here. Heck, if I had a credit card, I’d buy her a class set. Then maybe she’d get home a little earlier and play more ball. If your human is smart, they’ll fetch this book from the bookstore before you can say WOOF.

  • Roger

    Fun educational, cutting-edge scientific information!

    I am very surprised with this book, scientific information about the origin of dogs is very well explained for children and adolescents. The part of genetics and evolution goes deep and touches enough detail to make clear the most important aspects. It was even educational for me, the latest research data on breeding and the discovery of behavioral traits associated with various morphological traits were unknown to me.

    It also includes fun expl

    Fun educational, cutting-edge scientific information!

    I am very surprised with this book, scientific information about the origin of dogs is very well explained for children and adolescents. The part of genetics and evolution goes deep and touches enough detail to make clear the most important aspects. It was even educational for me, the latest research data on breeding and the discovery of behavioral traits associated with various morphological traits were unknown to me.

    It also includes fun explanations about the vision of dogs, their ears, their barking, and their powerful smell that can detect diseases in humans. In their genes they have the ability to read human body expressions and respond to them like no other species, they actually communicate with us!

    Our friendly playful friends are the most widespread mammal species on Earth along with humans for 5000 years, plus you'll also find information on how humans have created hundreds of breeds and traits about their body language to better understand your companion dog. Surely it is a species that will companion us when we go to live to the moon or other planets!

    My gratitude to the Publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to review the book

  • Hoover Public Library Kids and Teens

    This series is always awesome. And this particular one could be considered kid's best friend.

  • Stacey Shapiro

    Too much science needs more dogs

  • Comics Alternative
  • First Second Books

    In this volume we follow an adorable Cocker Jack named Rudy on a exciting trip to the dog park. There he introduces us to to his friends and works through key scientific principles from Gregory Mendel, Charles Darwin, and Dmitir Belyaev to explain dog taxonomy, origin, genetic makeup, and much more!

  • Brandi Stevens

    Great nonfiction graphic! It had a ton of information, and if you love dogs, it's a fun and interesting read. Genetics, evolution of breeds, and why things happen. Fantastic stuff and adorable illustrations!

  • Lola  Reviewer

    My brother just announced to me that he wants to adopt a dog, a decision I entirely support, so I felt motivated to read this book after I watched him be so excited at the idea of having a furry companion in his apartment.

    This is a good book for kids who want to learn more about genetics and the behaviours of dogs. I mainly recommend it to young readers because it contains many logical facts that are universally known. I already knew at least 70% of what the author discussed in this book.

    For in

    My brother just announced to me that he wants to adopt a dog, a decision I entirely support, so I felt motivated to read this book after I watched him be so excited at the idea of having a furry companion in his apartment.

    This is a good book for kids who want to learn more about genetics and the behaviours of dogs. I mainly recommend it to young readers because it contains many logical facts that are universally known. I already knew at least 70% of what the author discussed in this book.

    For instance, everybody knows that animals do not actually understand human language. What they do, however, do is associate words with behaviours or objects. Like, if you shove a ball in a dog’s face and say ‘‘ball’’ a couple of times, they’re going to connect the sound with the ball and get excited in the anticipation of playing with the object in question.

    What I enjoyed learning about most were the different theories presented and experiences conducted. I honestly thought all dogs became friendly towards human beings naturally, not that experiences were made to make them so. Of course some of it happened naturally, but humans became obsessed with domestic animals pretty early on and studied them closely.

    I just wish the author had dug deeper since my mind is telling me that there must be more. The author stayed on familiar ground at all times, discussing only popular contexts and subjects in regards to dogs. I wish he had paid more importance to the different interactions between dogs and other animals as well as the roles of dogs when it comes to helping human beings. He mentioned rapidly that they can smell cancer, but I had hoped he would focus on a specific case to prove and illustrate this fact.

    Not bad. Quite enjoyable actually and very accessible to young readers. It just could have contained more surprising information.

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