The Library at the Edge of the World by Felicity Hayes-McCoy

The Library at the Edge of the World

A warm, feel-good novel about the importance of finding a place where you belong - perfect for fans of Maeve Binchy.Local librarian Hanna Casey is wondering where it all went wrong ... Driving her mobile library van through Finfarran's farms and villages, she tries not to think of the sophisticated London life she abandoned when she left her cheating husband. Or that she's...

Title:The Library at the Edge of the World
Author:
Rating:

The Library at the Edge of the World Reviews

  • Alva

    This is a gorgeous Irish story about Hanna, Mary, Jazz, Fury and their supporting cast in fictional Finfarran. A sparkling tale of determination and goodness with a real sense of family and home. Wonderful storytelling by Felicity Hayes-McCoy who's working on a sequel and I for one can't wait!

  • Mike

    After separating from her husband, Hanna Casey returns to her mother's home in Ireland and soon finds herself in the middle of a battle to save her rural hometown.

    A pleasant story about a town coming together and the ragtag locals who stand up to 'city hall'. Unfortunately none of the characters really grew on me and the main character, Hanna, was borderline unlikable.

    However, it does offer a compelling view of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and its cozy small town setting should appeal to many rea

    After separating from her husband, Hanna Casey returns to her mother's home in Ireland and soon finds herself in the middle of a battle to save her rural hometown.

    A pleasant story about a town coming together and the ragtag locals who stand up to 'city hall'. Unfortunately none of the characters really grew on me and the main character, Hanna, was borderline unlikable.

    However, it does offer a compelling view of post-Celtic Tiger Ireland and its cozy small town setting should appeal to many readers.

  • Kim

    Such an enjoyable read. I really loved meeting all of the characters in this book and wish the author would write more about the inhabitants of this lovely Irish town (and surrounding area). My favorite was Fury O'Shea what a name!

    All in all a great relaxing book that would make a perfect lazy day read. Lose yourself in this lovely Irish town.

  • Tracy

    4.5 stars

    When I was a student 20 years ago I went to Ireland and subsequently became obsessed with All Things Irish. As an avid reader my reading choices were also influenced, and I read everything I could find by Marian Keyes and Maeve Binchy (20 years ago chick lit was HUGE).

    Fast forward to 2017. I received an ARC of The Library at the Edge of the World (thanks Netgalley) and hoped it would bring back some of that old Irish magic. It did.

    I found the descriptions of the house on the hill so evo

    4.5 stars

    When I was a student 20 years ago I went to Ireland and subsequently became obsessed with All Things Irish. As an avid reader my reading choices were also influenced, and I read everything I could find by Marian Keyes and Maeve Binchy (20 years ago chick lit was HUGE).

    Fast forward to 2017. I received an ARC of The Library at the Edge of the World (thanks Netgalley) and hoped it would bring back some of that old Irish magic. It did.

    I found the descriptions of the house on the hill so evocative. I actually had a dream while reading the book about having a little cabin of my own somewhere. The characters in the book were outspoken and kind, and life in and around the village seemed charming, despite the challenges. Sometimes I felt that there were too many details about the council's workings but I realize that they were integral to the plot.

    I thought this was an excellent feel good story of contemporary life in a small Irish village which is threatened by high level government decisions.

    This book is perfect for readers who want the same slice of Irish life feeling as Maeve Binchy and Marian Keyes but with less of a romance angle and more of a generic where is my life going angle.

  • Desiree

    It sure is a feel good book and I especially enjoyed the setting in a small town Ireland. It sounds like a lovely community. The ending is okay as all goes well, but I feel like there are some few loose ends that need to be tied. I guess there will be a sequel to this. I can’t seem to connect to Hanna most of the time and I don’t think it’s because of the age. There are also a lot of characters that it got so confusing to follow who is who. It started painfully slow for my liking that I find mys

    It sure is a feel good book and I especially enjoyed the setting in a small town Ireland. It sounds like a lovely community. The ending is okay as all goes well, but I feel like there are some few loose ends that need to be tied. I guess there will be a sequel to this. I can’t seem to connect to Hanna most of the time and I don’t think it’s because of the age. There are also a lot of characters that it got so confusing to follow who is who. It started painfully slow for my liking that I find myself skimming some pages because it fails to catch my interest. The conflict came later on in which I feel like a good quarter of the book can be shed off.

    It is well-written, though, and the main reason that I keep reading. That and the second half of the book is so much better that I managed to get through it until the end. From the numerous characters, there are some whom I enjoyed reading than the others. Sister Michael, a nun in the convent, and Fury, the carpenter who’s fixing Hanna’s cottage, both of them helped Hanna save the library and the community. There’s a hint of romance, too, which is not really the focus of the story, which I like. I also love how everyone banded together to save not only the library but the whole community. With all that, I’d say it is still a good read overall. It just needs the kind of reader who will enjoy not only the writing style but also the lovely setting in Ireland.

  • Dale Harcombe

    Who could resist a book with the title of a library at the edge of the world? Not me. The story revolves around Hanna Casey. After separating from her cheating husband, Hanna, in her early fifties, ends up living with her mother on the outskirts of a town in Ireland where she grew up. Her daughter Jazz has a job with an airline company and spends her time flying around the world, coming back every now and then to visit her mother and grandmother or at other times visiting her father in London. H

    Who could resist a book with the title of a library at the edge of the world? Not me. The story revolves around Hanna Casey. After separating from her cheating husband, Hanna, in her early fifties, ends up living with her mother on the outskirts of a town in Ireland where she grew up. Her daughter Jazz has a job with an airline company and spends her time flying around the world, coming back every now and then to visit her mother and grandmother or at other times visiting her father in London. Hanna has a job as librarian in the Finfarran Peninsula community. This is a far cry from the lifestyle she lived while married to Malcolm. But given the shortage of jobs in the area, she knows she is lucky to have a job at all. As she drives her mobile library van around the area, Hanna tries to keep herself aloof from the people and even those she works with at the library, like Conor. But then events conspire to change her way of looking at life and of the people around her.

    This is a charming, feel good story. The setting was stunning and the characters were interesting. Even though she can be prickly, I felt sorry for Hanna. Her mother Mary Casey is an aggravating character. No wonder Hanna could not contemplate continuing to live with her and decides to renovate the old house left to her by her great aunt Maggie. Some of Hanna’s interactions with Fury, the builder, are classic. There is a hint of romance in the novel, but it is not the main focus. Basically this is a book about relationships, community and working together. I enjoyed this charming read that leaves the reader feeling in a good place.

  • Laurie

    This was a bit hard to get into and rather slow-going at times; a lot of characters to keep track of and not all of them were fun to spend time with. I was especially annoyed that the main character, a trained librarian, was opposed to providing her community with the most basic of library programming and services -- she was against book clubs, for heaven's sake. No wonder her library was threatened with closing. Maybe libraries are different in Ireland than they are here in the U.S., but her at

    This was a bit hard to get into and rather slow-going at times; a lot of characters to keep track of and not all of them were fun to spend time with. I was especially annoyed that the main character, a trained librarian, was opposed to providing her community with the most basic of library programming and services -- she was against book clubs, for heaven's sake. No wonder her library was threatened with closing. Maybe libraries are different in Ireland than they are here in the U.S., but her attitude was baffling to me as a librarian.

    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for providing an e-galley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Kate Olson

    Oh, what an absolutely wonderful book for every book lover on earth! I adored this story of a public library, a woman starting over, family, friends and community set in rural Ireland. The setting is fabulous, the people make my heart happy and the storyline of a librarian saving a library makes this school librarian jump for joy. Thanks a million to the publisher for sending me a complimentary review copy of this title!

    Now, if all of that makes me so happy, just IMAGINE how excited I was to fi

    Oh, what an absolutely wonderful book for every book lover on earth! I adored this story of a public library, a woman starting over, family, friends and community set in rural Ireland. The setting is fabulous, the people make my heart happy and the storyline of a librarian saving a library makes this school librarian jump for joy. Thanks a million to the publisher for sending me a complimentary review copy of this title!

    Now, if all of that makes me so happy, just IMAGINE how excited I was to find out that this is actually the first book in a series that was originally published in Ireland and is just now coming to the US from Harper Perennial! AND, the next 2 books in the series are available to buy in the US through Book Depository, so of course I ordered them immediately and can now binge read them the moment they arrive! YAY! The US cover is VERY different from the Irish covers ~ the Irish covers are very much in the "English cozy" style with illustrations and curly cutesy font. Both are great, but I do think this photographic cover will do amazingly well here in the states!

  • Gaele

    Some twenty-odd years earlier, Hanna Casey fled the oppressing and limiting Finfarran peninsula heading for London and dreams to work with art, maintaining library collections. But, a whirlwind romance and subsequent pregnancy led to a marriage. With the loss of that pregnancy and a decade-later birth of her daughter, she thought her life complete. But, when the realization came that her now ex-husband had a long-standing affair with a family friend, she packed up herself and her daughter and ra

    Some twenty-odd years earlier, Hanna Casey fled the oppressing and limiting Finfarran peninsula heading for London and dreams to work with art, maintaining library collections. But, a whirlwind romance and subsequent pregnancy led to a marriage. With the loss of that pregnancy and a decade-later birth of her daughter, she thought her life complete. But, when the realization came that her now ex-husband had a long-standing affair with a family friend, she packed up herself and her daughter and ran home. Refusing even a penny from her ex, she’s reinvented herself as a prim, proper and perhaps even coldly efficient librarian in the little town of Lissbeg, rebuffing opportunities for friendship and closeness with everyone.

    What emerges here is the slow unraveling and unburdening of Hanna’s grief, as she learns to see just who her ex-husband is, her own vulnerability and willingness to take a backseat to everyone else’s ideas, her own discontent with her mother and the gradual definition of her own life, made in her own making. Sure there are huge and small missteps, some impulsive decisions and outbursts on her part and a little piece of land with an overgrown garden, leaky roof and field full of abandoned appliances, she starts to find a path. Never easy or solely gentle, the self-interest that spurred Hanna’s growth was gradual, she often could be found kicking and screaming (metaphorically) with her ‘face like the backside of a chicken’ being her go-to expression through much of the story.

    But, what is most striking is the changes in Hanna – it isn’t that we get to know her better, for she is almost wholly unlikable in her pity-party prickles out persona early on, but the changes, the flashes of optimism and determination that arise through each moment she sees something new, or takes a moment to really listen. The strength from the elderly nun, the desperation of her assistant Conor, the brightness and optimism of the girls at HaberDashery, her mum, her daughter and so many others, the story reads simply with plenty of moments, characters and conflicts that brighten and enliven the read. The growth and changes in Hanna were contrasted with the rehab of her little cottage and the stalwart, strange and always bartering Fury and the Divil, you’ll want to head to this little peninsula, see the gardens and seal-cove and visit the new illuminated text in the Lissbeg Library.

    I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via Edelweiss for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility.

    Review first appeared at

  • Christie

    Not as good as Binchy and the main character had some inconsistencies that bothered me a bit, but this was still a feel-good story for when I was sick :)

Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.