Brand, Meet Story: How to Create Engaging Content to Win Business and Influence Your Audience by Heather Pemberton Levy

Brand, Meet Story: How to Create Engaging Content to Win Business and Influence Your Audience

Think of the last great article you read or the last great speech you heard. Chances are, if you remember one key message, you also remember one compelling story. That’s because the best content starts with a story. When it comes to marketing, the best business content starts with a story the audience cares about, not the brand’s message about what it wants to sell them.In...

Title:Brand, Meet Story: How to Create Engaging Content to Win Business and Influence Your Audience
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Brand, Meet Story: How to Create Engaging Content to Win Business and Influence Your Audience Reviews

  • Emily

    This has a lot of great ideas for driving customer engagement through content.

  • William Brophy

    If you seriously are considering a content marketing strategy or already have one that isn't exactly working then you MUST read this book today! Its an easy read and chock full of examples to help you out. Don't forget to print out or hang up the appendix for reference next time you outline content!

  • Jay

    You might have had this happen to you. You are giving a presentation at work to persuade co-workers to install new software and change your work processes to use it. You start off describing the software, its features, how it looks. As you begin to answer questions, you realize that you are no longer in control of the meeting, and it degenerates into concerns about icon colors. You never get to discuss the impact this change would make on people, and you can’t tell if they figured it out by them

    You might have had this happen to you. You are giving a presentation at work to persuade co-workers to install new software and change your work processes to use it. You start off describing the software, its features, how it looks. As you begin to answer questions, you realize that you are no longer in control of the meeting, and it degenerates into concerns about icon colors. You never get to discuss the impact this change would make on people, and you can’t tell if they figured it out by themselves. I’ve been there. It’s a problem of order. “Brand, Meet Story” suggests turning around the order in how you persuade people. Instead of starting by thinking about the product, start with the need, and tell a story about how that need could be filled. While you might be more familiar with your product and brand, people really don’t care about that, they just want their needs fulfilled. Aim at that.

    The book is excellent in what it covers. It makes its case and describes how to write using the framework that I described above. It makes a counter-intuitive claim that adding detail to a story helps a person identify with the story, and I think that's correct. The book’s website has a very simple one-page worksheet that lays out this framework, good with or without reading the book. While the book is aimed at writers, I believe it is also a good starting point for presentations, videos, and demos. While I have taken corporate classes to teach demo and storytelling skills, I found this a useful book in giving that simple framework that you can base your writing on. I also found the examples mostly interesting.

    I listened to the audio version, and for spending only 2 hours, I feel I learned quite a bit. While some business books don't seem to work well on audio due to complexity, this one does works well.

  • Joséphine (Word Revel)

    is exactly that which the title promises. It's much shorter than I expected when I first stumbled across it but this book is proof that we don't always need long books to adequately cover a topic. Levy presents her ideas in a straightforward manner, employing her own methods in how she organises the book. Most ideas on content creation and how the audience relates weren't new to me but I liked how they were consolidated and linked up to outline the process of branding.

    Ultimatel

    is exactly that which the title promises. It's much shorter than I expected when I first stumbled across it but this book is proof that we don't always need long books to adequately cover a topic. Levy presents her ideas in a straightforward manner, employing her own methods in how she organises the book. Most ideas on content creation and how the audience relates weren't new to me but I liked how they were consolidated and linked up to outline the process of branding.

    Ultimately, it takes time to develop a skill, which

    encourages readers to do by providing a cheat sheet at the end. Levy prompts readers to apply her methods and to keep referring to them in future. The focus on active learning is bound to make this a useful book for many, regardless of their (lack of) experience in branding, and marketing at large.

  • Bridget Greci

    Did I miss something? the author says start with a story but doesn't start with her own.

  • Cecilia

    I wanted to learn how to create better, more engaging content like they said this book would help me do. Not be told (emphasis on the 'telling' over 'showing') for 100 or so pages why storytelling works. I mean, unless you're completely oblivious to content marketing (in which case, are you marketing under a rock?), this is a waste of time.

    Also, the author told a lot of her own stories but couldn't get me to care about them. Very unoriginal and uninteresting.. and very ironic.

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