Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan

Rich People Problems

When Nicholas Young hears that his grandmother, Su Yi, is on her deathbed, he rushes to be by her bedside--but he's not alone. It seems the entire Shang-Young clan has convened from all corners of the globe, ostensibly to care for their matriarch but truly to stake claim on the massive fortune that Su Yi controls. With each family member secretly fantasizing about getting...

Title:Rich People Problems
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Rich People Problems Reviews

  • Suzanne

    I received an ARC of Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems from Netgalley and Doubleday in exchange for an honest review.

    In this third installation, Kevin Kwan brings back the magic I felt China Rich Girlfriend was missing. Although to be honest, I could still do without Kitty. I did not like her in the second book, and still felt like she was mostly unneeded - mainly because there are so many great characters in the book who could have used the time given to her.

    Back to the great parts of this boo

    I received an ARC of Kevin Kwan's Rich People Problems from Netgalley and Doubleday in exchange for an honest review.

    In this third installation, Kevin Kwan brings back the magic I felt China Rich Girlfriend was missing. Although to be honest, I could still do without Kitty. I did not like her in the second book, and still felt like she was mostly unneeded - mainly because there are so many great characters in the book who could have used the time given to her.

    Back to the great parts of this book - I continue to love the relationships between Rachel and Nick and Astrid and Charlie, and I loved that Kevin brought back Rachel's best friend too! I also thoroughly loved getting the glimpses into Su Yi's history.

    There is a whole lot of great drama, and definitely some laugh out loud moments - mostly around Eddie and his ridiculousness. And of course, there is the luxury these characters are afforded. The beautiful vacation spots, the descriptions some times made me feel like I could be right there.

    Well done Kevin Kwan! I cannot wait to see Crazy Rich Asians when it hits the big screen - and who knows....maybe we will get a fourth book in the future!

  • Lisa Kong

    Wow, Kevin Kwan has done it again ( I knew he would). I had VERY high expectations for this book and they were exceeded so so far.

    This book is full of unexpected plot twists, hilarious and outrageous moments, and had characters I could relate to even though I can't even imagine being 1/100 times as a rich as them. Truth is, Asians (esp Chinese) still have their cultural roots, most of which I could 100% relate to and that's why I love this series so much. The storylines get more and more compli

    Wow, Kevin Kwan has done it again ( I knew he would). I had VERY high expectations for this book and they were exceeded so so far.

    This book is full of unexpected plot twists, hilarious and outrageous moments, and had characters I could relate to even though I can't even imagine being 1/100 times as a rich as them. Truth is, Asians (esp Chinese) still have their cultural roots, most of which I could 100% relate to and that's why I love this series so much. The storylines get more and more complicated and in my mind I don't think they'll ever cross but BOY in the end they all collided with so much force it was perfect. My only complaint is I seriously wish this book was longer as it's the finale and I'm sure Kevin Kwan has only told a quarter of his outrageous stories, most of which he probably experienced. (btw, I still can't imagine a world in which these type of people ACTUALLY exist). Also, Oliver T'sien (my favorite character from CRA 1 whom I lost my respects to after the CRG ending) gained back my love. Also, I thought Kitty Pong was crazy in the second book, and boy I was wrong. Honestly this is so rambly but basically this will be probably my favorite book of the year and I will miss these characters dearly (though I will secretly be crossing my fingers for a new installment =D)

    I'M SO EXCITED FOR THIS I CANT EVEN. TWO OF MY MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS ARE COMING OUT ON THE SAME DAY 5/23. IDEK WHICH ONE TO READ FIRST. I KNOW KEVIN KWAN IS GOING TO WRITE ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS I WILL EVER READ. I WISH IT WAS LIKE 184839291 PAGES. XD

  • Larry H

    Sometimes the best antidote for the craziness of the world is reading a wacky book. (It leaves my head clearer than drinking would, anyway.) Kevin Kwan's

    , the third in his Crazy Rich Asians series, was just the ticket. Campy, a bit melodramatic, and utterly outrageous, Kwan's tales of three generations of Chinese families, set mostly in Singapore, provides a hysterical glimpse into how the ultra-rich live.

    "Peel away the veneer of wealth and sophistication and you'll find e

    Sometimes the best antidote for the craziness of the world is reading a wacky book. (It leaves my head clearer than drinking would, anyway.) Kevin Kwan's

    , the third in his Crazy Rich Asians series, was just the ticket. Campy, a bit melodramatic, and utterly outrageous, Kwan's tales of three generations of Chinese families, set mostly in Singapore, provides a hysterical glimpse into how the ultra-rich live.

    "Peel away the veneer of wealth and sophistication and you'll find extremely provincial, narrow-minded people. The problem is that they all have too much money, and it's come so easily to them that they think they're bloody geniuses and so they are always right."

    Su Yi, the matriarch of the Young Family, is on her deathbed. She has a massive fortune, capped by Tyersall Park, a 64-acre estate on prime land in Singapore. While Asian tradition would usually expect Su Yi to leave the estate to her eldest son, Philip, many believed she'd bequeath it to his son, her favorite grandson, Nicholas. But Nicholas has been estranged from his grandmother after she voiced her disapproval of his marrying Rachel, whom she viewed as a common Chinese girl, so he hasn't been home to visit her in several years.

    With disposition of Su Yi's estate in question, her entire family heads to Tyersall Park to hopefully get into her good graces (and perhaps move up a bit in her will) before she passes. Her eldest daughter, Felicity, knows that she'll probably get the short end of the stick because of her gender, but she has bigger fish to fry—her daughter Astrid is scandalizing the family with her relationship with her college boyfriend Charlie Wu. The family never thought that he was good enough for her, even though he is a self-made technology tycoon now, they don't want the two to get together now, even though both are on the verge of divorcing.

    Another grandson, Edson (Eddie) Chang, has also come to be with Su Yi, with his family in tow. Eddie is the most status-conscious of any of the family members—he always has to be sure people know he's wearing top-of-the-line designers, the most expensive and unique shoes (one pair needed to be dyed multiple times, so they took weeks to be ready for him), and the most luxurious of luxury timepieces. He is bound and determined to finally get the respect he believes he deserves, and if that means keeping others away from his grandmother until he wins her over to his side, so be it.

    While Nicholas says he doesn't care about the estate and doesn't want to revisit the hurt his grandmother caused, he realizes he needs to say goodbye to her. (Plus, his high-strung mother insists about five times a day, when she's not interrogating him and Rachel about when they'll give her a grandchild.) His return home dredges up some resentment (especially with his cousin Eddie), but spending time with Su Yi and other family members reminds him of the importance of family, but reinforces how smart he and Rachel are to live in New York!

    Meanwhile, former, umm, actress Kitty Pong has finally gained some status with her marriage to China's second-richest man, Jack Bing. But her quest for respectability keeps falling short, as she can't seem to reconcile her schizophrenic tastes in fashion and decor with what is expected of someone in her position. Even worse is the fact that she is convinced her stepdaughter, fashionista-turned-attorney's wife Colette, is trying to upstage her at every turn. No matter how hard she tries to stand out, Colette seems to be in her way, despite her sudden passion for the environment and no-frills fashion.

    "Scientists talk about how we inherit health issues from our parents through our genes, but we also inherit this entire lineage of fear and pain—generations of it."

    is quite funny as it chronicles the over-the-top behavior of these people as they battle for an inheritance, social acceptance, love, and most of all, more money. Kwan imbues his book with painstaking details (even his footnotes are hysterical while also being informative) and a litany of designers, couture, and descriptions of food sure to make your stomach growl quite loudly.

    Even the characters' names are amazing—my favorite is probably Scheherazade Shang, or Harvard Bing, the infant son of Kitty and Jack. The visuals Kwan's imagery conveys are eye-popping, and some of the dialogue is campier than any soap opera diva or villain's.

    Like many, I've occasionally thought about what life might be like if I didn't have to worry about money—what I would do, where I would go, what I would spend it on. But the amount of money the characters in this book throw around (one character gets an eye lift for a rare fish to make it look younger) is unfathomable, which makes the book so much fun to read.

    A true guilty pleasure.

    See all of my reviews at

    .

  • DeB MaRtEnS

    I've loved this series, primarily because it is outrageous, funny and over the top. New money, old money, extravagances beyond comprehension combined with family rivalry, secrecy and love stories - delicious! Add that it is centred in Singapore, provides reams of cultural education as a serious side dish to the funky fun, and the series was simply a treat of entertainment and novelty. I hope that Kevin Kwan leads readers on more adventures. The romps were "divine", and I'd like to savour another

    I've loved this series, primarily because it is outrageous, funny and over the top. New money, old money, extravagances beyond comprehension combined with family rivalry, secrecy and love stories - delicious! Add that it is centred in Singapore, provides reams of cultural education as a serious side dish to the funky fun, and the series was simply a treat of entertainment and novelty. I hope that Kevin Kwan leads readers on more adventures. The romps were "divine", and I'd like to savour another!

  • Jeann (Happy Indulgence)

    I loved Rich People Problems, it was hilarious, outlandish and filled with entertainment. It reminded me a lot of what I loved out of

    , the bizarre antics of the Shang-Young family, the name and label dropping and all of the deliciously decadent food.

    Full review to come.

    ---

    This review was originally posted on

    . Check it out for more reviews!

    What do you do when you’re outrageously rich and you’re part of the most powerful, influential families i

    I loved Rich People Problems, it was hilarious, outlandish and filled with entertainment. It reminded me a lot of what I loved out of

    , the bizarre antics of the Shang-Young family, the name and label dropping and all of the deliciously decadent food.

    Full review to come.

    ---

    This review was originally posted on

    . Check it out for more reviews!

    What do you do when you’re outrageously rich and you’re part of the most powerful, influential families in Asia? You spend it of course, in the wildest and craziest ways.

    From plastering oneself with the next season’s designer labels, to being named a Countess and having everyone bow to them, to getting plastic surgery for a prized pet fish, there is no going too far for these people. Only not going far enough which is ridiculously entertaining.

    With the revered grandmother Su Yi’s health on the line and her inheritance as the talk of the town, the Shang-Young clan make preparations for her legacy.

    Nicholas Young, the prodigal grandson living in New York, debates whether to return and make peace with his grandmother. Astrid, the good daughter who has never disappointed her parents, is in the midst of divorce and reuniting with an old flame. The outlandish Edison is set out to mourn by his grandmother’s bedside in the showiest of manners, and it’s also not the last we’ve seen of the tacky Kitty Pong in her rise to fame.

    I loved all the vivid descriptions of the French inspired grandeur of the Tyersall Park home, and the stunning locations from the designer boutiques in France, to the sandy beaches of Asia, the buzzing food stalls of Singapore and everything in between. With the name dropping of expensive watches, designer labels and even pop culture references, Rich People Problems shows us a world unattainable to most. I particularly loved the minute descriptions of the delicious Asian delicacies, from dim sum, to fried noodles with gravy, and of course, multiple course degustations.

    My favourite part of Rich People Problems is that it felt very much like a direct sequel of the first book, as we see what becomes of each and every character. I loved Nick Young and the loyalty he feels towards his family and preserving Tyersall Park, even though his grandma banished him several years ago. I loved Rachel and how she tries to do what’s best for Nick and his family, despite their ill treatment to her. I also loved seeing all the family members reunite under one roof over their grandmother’s health and also a breathtaking and oestentatious proposal that could only be orchestrated by the filthy rich.

    While I loved the conclusion of the book and seeing what becomes of our favourite characters, I felt that the ending was a bit rushed. The epilogue references some scenes that I wish we got to experience firsthand. Aside from this, everything was wrapped up beautifully and you couldn’t ask for a better ending to this wild and crazy whirlwind of a book.

    As the last book in the trilogy, Rich People Problems reminded me of everything I loved about the first book – fame, fortune and the wacky antics of Asia’s finest. This excessive, over the top world was entertaining, fast paced, hilarious and ridiculously addictive. I can’t wait for the Crazy Rich Asians movie to come out, especially with it’s all Asian cast. If you’re looking for a hilariously entertaining insight to the filthy rich from a different perspective, you can’t go wrong with this series.

  • Bailey

    An amazing end to a really wonderfully charming and hilarious trilogy.

  • Cindy Burnett

    Rich People Problems is a fabulous read. Kevin Kwan’s witty writing and highly entertaining characters make Rich People Problems so much fun to read. There are A LOT of characters to keep up with, but once I had them all straight again I didn’t want the book to end. Kwan is a master at depicting familial relationships, and with everyone descending on Tyersall Park, there is much family drama to be had.

    I really enjoyed learning more about Su Yi’s background and Tyersall Park itself. Kwan’s descr

    Rich People Problems is a fabulous read. Kevin Kwan’s witty writing and highly entertaining characters make Rich People Problems so much fun to read. There are A LOT of characters to keep up with, but once I had them all straight again I didn’t want the book to end. Kwan is a master at depicting familial relationships, and with everyone descending on Tyersall Park, there is much family drama to be had.

    I really enjoyed learning more about Su Yi’s background and Tyersall Park itself. Kwan’s descriptions of the ultra-rich lifestyles of certain characters and the outlandish behavior of others, including poor Eddie and Kitty. A fish gets plastic surgery, a socialite has a “personal documentarian”, and a decorator creates a look he called “Ming emperor meets Louis-Napoleon at Studio 54” which includes Tibetan yak hair dyed simmering shades of persimmon. Kwan is truly a master at depicting the absurdity of various characters’ lifestyles in the most hilarious manner. Be prepared to laugh out loud repeatedly.

    I was excited to see artist James Turrell receive a shout-out from Kwan. Turrell designed an illuminated tunnel at the art museum near my home, and it remains one of our favorite things to see whenever we visit the museum.

    I highly recommend this book and hope there will be another one. I am looking forward to the Crazy Rich Asians movie in the meantime. Thanks to Doubleday and NetGalley for the chance to read this book.

  • Rincey

    These are so consistently fun

  • Julie

    Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan is a 2017 Doubleday publication.

    Hilarity and intrigue merge to create yet another wildly entertaining installment in this fabulous series!

    As with the previous installments, a little time has elapsed, meaning there have been a few changes since we last touched base with all these zany characters.

    Rachel and Nicholas receive word that his grandmother is suffering from congestive heart failure. As the family begins to gather around her, Nicholas feels pressured fr

    Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan is a 2017 Doubleday publication.

    Hilarity and intrigue merge to create yet another wildly entertaining installment in this fabulous series!

    As with the previous installments, a little time has elapsed, meaning there have been a few changes since we last touched base with all these zany characters.

    Rachel and Nicholas receive word that his grandmother is suffering from congestive heart failure. As the family begins to gather around her, Nicholas feels pressured from all sides to return home.

    He finally agrees, but in the meantime Eddie is working hard hoping he will be the one to inherit from his grandmother’s will, and Astrid is going through a contentious divorce as is her lover, Charlie Wu.

    Kitty is still playing all angles, working to get all she deserves, (or thinks she does), while engaging in a battle of wills with her step-daughter.

    What I enjoyed most about this installment was the background information provided about Su Yi, and the surprising turn of events that gives Nicholas the chance to finally understand his grandmother. It's poignant, insightful, and very interesting- but the irony! OMG! Hilarious.

    But, never fear, all the fabulous clothes, food, and destination spots are described in vivid details, and there is certainly no shortage of drama!!

    The way everything came together in the end suggests this is the last installment in the series. Boo!

    I have really had a lot of fun reading about these insanely rich Asians and all their conniving, manipulative shallowness, as well as learning about their language, slang, and traditions. But, the epic and wonderful love stories were at the heart of everything. The characters evolved and changed beautifully, most of them finding contentment in one way or the other, which is very satisfying.

    I have heard there was a movie in works based on this series, so at least I have that to look forward to!

    Overall, this third, and last, book in the series is every bit as entertaining as the first two, but with a slight bittersweet tone at times. But, the divine ending was all I could have asked for!!

    4.5 stars

  • Joce (squibblesreads)

    I’m so so so so so sad to leave my friends in this series. I didn’t want this book to end so I could spend more time with them. Overall, more emotional, with more backstory than the first two and we really sunk into the spirit of the characters and the elements that make up the glue that holds the family together. Ugh, I’m obsessed. If I had to rank the three, the first one is my favorite, followed by this one, and the second is my least favorite. But they’re all wonderful.

    Something to make note

    I’m so so so so so sad to leave my friends in this series. I didn’t want this book to end so I could spend more time with them. Overall, more emotional, with more backstory than the first two and we really sunk into the spirit of the characters and the elements that make up the glue that holds the family together. Ugh, I’m obsessed. If I had to rank the three, the first one is my favorite, followed by this one, and the second is my least favorite. But they’re all wonderful.

    Something to make note of was that there was a small subplot that involved questionable villification of mental illness and use of the “hysterical woman” trope which I didn’t enjoy. Like don’t let Freud into this book please. I deducted 1 star here, or it would have been the full 5.


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