Ghosts of Greenglass House by Kate Milford

Ghosts of Greenglass House

Welcome back to the irresistible world of Greenglass House where thirteen-year-old Milo is, once again, spending the winter holidays stuck in a house full of strange guests who are not what they seem. There are fresh clues to uncover as friends old and new join in his search for a mysterious map and a famous smuggler’s lost haul....

Title:Ghosts of Greenglass House
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Ghosts of Greenglass House Reviews

  • Brandy Painter

    Fans of the first Greenglass House book will be happy to see most of their favorite characters return here. In a many ways the plot rehashes a lot of what was done in the first book. I found myself not quite as into it as I was expecting. There are a lot of extraneous details, and at times the plot feels confused and jumbled. Milford's descriptive prose is in evidence throughout the book and it does have a very grounded sense of place.

  • Ticklish Owl

    If you liked this book, you might also enjoy:

    (read before The Left-Handed Fate)

  • Amie

    This was good, but the first one is my favorite of the two.

  • Aaron

    Honestly, I could not immerse myself in this story as much as I did the first one. The first half of the book seemed to dawdle a little bit. I did enjoy the last half as the mystery started to ignite a little more. The Pine family runs Greenglass House as an inn for smugglers. The setting itself is creative, unique and almost the most intriguing character in the book. Young Milo Pine and a friend work to solve a mystery featuring a kooky set of suspects that mingle through the inn as Christmas a

    Honestly, I could not immerse myself in this story as much as I did the first one. The first half of the book seemed to dawdle a little bit. I did enjoy the last half as the mystery started to ignite a little more. The Pine family runs Greenglass House as an inn for smugglers. The setting itself is creative, unique and almost the most intriguing character in the book. Young Milo Pine and a friend work to solve a mystery featuring a kooky set of suspects that mingle through the inn as Christmas approaches. There is a supernatural component to the mystery as well as heavy use of an RPG called Odd Trails that allows the young sleuths to have the abilities necessary to effectively tackle the mystery. The mix of fantasy and mystery worked really well in book for me, but not as much in book two.

  • Shelley

    Rounding up a 4.5. Milo is back, it's the next Christmas break, and there's new people with new mysteries to unravel--plus some old friends. This wasn't quite as atmospheric and amazing as the first, but it was a very worthy follow up. I loved seeing Georgie and Clem again, and Milo's parents remain relatable and awesome. I really appreciated seeing Milo struggle with well meaning adults who ultimately make him feel like "actual Chinese person" doesn't refer to him, and how the adults around him

    Rounding up a 4.5. Milo is back, it's the next Christmas break, and there's new people with new mysteries to unravel--plus some old friends. This wasn't quite as atmospheric and amazing as the first, but it was a very worthy follow up. I loved seeing Georgie and Clem again, and Milo's parents remain relatable and awesome. I really appreciated seeing Milo struggle with well meaning adults who ultimately make him feel like "actual Chinese person" doesn't refer to him, and how the adults around him help him work through solutions and the big feelings. The many ghosts and holiday folk tales with tiny nuggets of truth in them were fascinating, and the mystery was appropriately tangled and twisty and delightfully fascinating. I really like how the author works hard to create characters sensitive to other people's feelings and reactions, highlighting the importance of words and how the stories told about others can affect them, and shows exactly why it's the right thing to do. Beautiful writing, beautiful storytelling, I would love a third title.

  • Brenda

    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreeLine

    Opening lines: "Frost was pretty much the worst. It was like a promise with nothing behind it. It was like not enough icing on a cookie, not enough butter on toast."

    Milo is once again getting ready to spend his winter vacation at Greenglass House, but his holiday gets off to a rocky start. Not only is he cranky about the lack of snow, he's also distressed over an incident that occurred at school with his History teacher

    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreeLine

    Opening lines: "Frost was pretty much the worst. It was like a promise with nothing behind it. It was like not enough icing on a cookie, not enough butter on toast."

    Milo is once again getting ready to spend his winter vacation at Greenglass House, but his holiday gets off to a rocky start. Not only is he cranky about the lack of snow, he's also distressed over an incident that occurred at school with his History teacher, and his friend Meddy has mysteriously been missing since last year. Plus Emmett Syebuck, a guest of the Inn has overstayed his welcome sketching their stained glass windows. Things do begin to brighten up when Clem and Georgie show up using a girls bachelorette weekend as a cover for a heist they did that went wrong leading them to need a safe place to hide from their double-crossing partner and a rival thief. Things take an unexpected turn for the worse when a group of carolers from Liberty of Gammerbund, a Rest Home for the Mentally Chaotic or asylum near Nagspeake show up, and some of the singers are involved in accidents resulting in everyone spending the night. When Clem and Georgie's loot from their heist also goes missing, we once again have an Inn full of guest's who are not who they seem. Someone among them is Gilawfer the fence and another is Canlebone, the famous thief.

    Ghosts of Greenglass House is the perfect setting for a mystery with its long staircases, stained glass windows and the cold air of Winter blowing outside. The one thing I found myself missing initially as much as Milo was Meddy, I really wanted the two of them to get started on another campaign to help Georgie and Clem recover their loot. At first, Milo thinks he can tackle the mystery, but playing the campaign on his own isn't half as fun and all the skills that he previously had with his character don't seem to be working for him in the same way. Despite this, there were plenty of new characters to sort through and the setup of the new mystery linked to the legendary smuggler Violet Cross to keep me entertained. Meddy does eventually return after sensing that something is wrong with Milo and together the two begin a new campaign. Maybe it's the Dungeons and Dragons lover in me, but I really enjoy this aspect of the story. Kids being creative in setting up all the details about their characters and skills and especially the way that Milo creates a character of the person he would like to be, complete with a backstory that helps him to understand some of his own history. As a side note, in the first story, Milford explained the spark for Greenglass House was her own plans to adopt a Chinese boy and a desire to incorporate these themes into a story that one day he could read himself. Within Ghosts of Greenglass House, Milford continues Milo's struggles over his feelings about being adopted as well as highlighting how making assumptions about people are wrong. I was also pleasantly surprised with the historical details about the history and traditions of Liberty or the Rest Home near Nagspeake, details on Milo picking locks, as well as how cartography and maps were an important part of the story. Oh and the continuation of each of the guests telling a story helping to piece together the mystery, just love it. Now I know I haven't mentioned anything about the Ghosts in the title, and I'm really hesitant to do that now. Suffice it to say, I liked the clever way in which things were resolved for Meddy and happy the ending leaves room for future mysteries for Milo and Meddy.

  • Lori

    NOTE: I received an advanced readers copy from Net Galley of this book.

    I absolutely love all of Kate Milford's books for many reasons - depth of characters, unique settings, intricate plots - and Ghosts of Greenglass House has all of these and more. Readers don't necessarily have to have read the first book, however they will find it much more satisfying when reading #2 if they have the first book since certain plot points and characters make reappearances.

    The story follows Milo as he attempts

    NOTE: I received an advanced readers copy from Net Galley of this book.

    I absolutely love all of Kate Milford's books for many reasons - depth of characters, unique settings, intricate plots - and Ghosts of Greenglass House has all of these and more. Readers don't necessarily have to have read the first book, however they will find it much more satisfying when reading #2 if they have the first book since certain plot points and characters make reappearances.

    The story follows Milo as he attempts to unravel yet another mystery involving a motley crew of house guests over the winter holiday. In addition to trying to recover lost items, helping his old friend make contact with her father, and determining which guests are who they say they are, Milo is also dealing with personal issues stemming from a difficult encounter with a teacher.

    The characters are lovely, charming, interesting, and compelling - I love the growth in Milo as he works out how to handle identity issues stemming from his Chinese heritage and his adoption as well as his own burgeoning sense of confidence in who he is. The setting is equally interesting with historical and artistic connections to the town that play out in stained glass windows and chandeliers. The mystery is satisfying, as is Milo's thought process (along with that of those helping him) as he puzzles his way through the clues.

    Kate Milford's books have a magical, enchanting quality reminiscent of the best folklore or fairy tales and this 2nd installment of the Greenglass series continues with an imaginative and enjoyable mystery.

  • Clay

    This isn't a stand alone and I'd encourage interested readers to pick up the excellent Greenglass House #1 first, but it's a solid follow-up, with--no spoiler 'cause it's in the title--more than one ghost, another challenging mystery for main-character Milo, plus thoughtful interchanges about what it's like to be adopted and the challenges of being a Chinese-born child with white parents. Recommended to Greenglass fans.

  • Darlene

    I won this from GoodReads! Yay! Thank you!!!!

  • Jennifer Linsky

    About once a year -- twice, if it's a _very_ good year -- I find a book that makes me run about to everyone I know (and who will stand still for long enough) and press that book into their hands, exclaiming, "This is so good! Read this!"

    A couple of years ago, that book was

    by Kate Milford. In the ensuing years, I have read, I believe, everything which Kate has published, and even established a friendly acquaintanceship with Kate herself. All of her books are good, but

    About once a year -- twice, if it's a _very_ good year -- I find a book that makes me run about to everyone I know (and who will stand still for long enough) and press that book into their hands, exclaiming, "This is so good! Read this!"

    A couple of years ago, that book was

    by Kate Milford. In the ensuing years, I have read, I believe, everything which Kate has published, and even established a friendly acquaintanceship with Kate herself. All of her books are good, but

    and its new sequel are

    Let's get this bit out of the way, first. I

    like these books. I am a true Jenny Tar who served in the Navy, who hates pirates with her entire soul, views smugglers as but one step removed from piracy, and looks on the work of thieves rather darkly. And in Nagspeake (

    ), smugglers and thieves are the heroes.

    Yet, somehow, Nagspeake has joined places like Star's Hollow and Kiki's city as spots I desperately want to visit; spots I think I would fit in, would belong, could call

    . How does Kate manage this feat? In part, because it seems that she and I share some obsessions: maps and navigation; folklore; traditions; family; and, of course, books.

    And part of it is her beautiful use of language. Please allow me to share a quote by way of demonstration:

    This house had survived for many, many years. It had copper pipes that reached down into the earth like roots, its woodwork had taught its stonework how to breathe in exchange for lessons in strength, and the ironwork that chased the eaves and climbed the walls and curled along the windows danced in the sunset.

    How can you not fall in love with that?


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