The Art of Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope by Carol Titelman

The Art of Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope

To compliment the new Special Edition versions of the classic Star Wars films being released in theaters, these new editions of the bestselling companion books each include sixteen pages of all-new material, plus all of the breathtaking photos, and artwork that have made them a must for all Star Wars collectors and movie buffs. Complete scripts for A New Hope and Return of...

Title:The Art of Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Art of Star Wars: Episode IV—A New Hope Reviews

  • Paul

    Wonderfully informed, funny, and disgusting commentary of various current and past wars. It's a collection of his columns from the Exile, a Russian expat paper, and even when you don't agree with his point of view, you'll enjoy the War Nerd's writing.

  • Parka

    (

    )

    The visuals that go by the scripts are mainly storyboards and character sketches. There are not too much ship drawings. Full colour paintings are few also. Well, this is the first art book for the first Star Wars movie.

  • Andrew

    Where to start with this book. first off you understand that this is not just simply worshipping star wars - don't get me wrong it was the first movie I saw at the cinema - it scare the hell out of me (I was 5 do the maths) but this means something more. My brother was fascinated with the film and was just getting in to graphic desgin - and he was lucky enough to borrow the original artwork books (circa 1979) now these were fabulously rare and expensive and equally poorly bound - so they were wo

    Where to start with this book. first off you understand that this is not just simply worshipping star wars - don't get me wrong it was the first movie I saw at the cinema - it scare the hell out of me (I was 5 do the maths) but this means something more. My brother was fascinated with the film and was just getting in to graphic desgin - and he was lucky enough to borrow the original artwork books (circa 1979) now these were fabulously rare and expensive and equally poorly bound - so they were worshipped and i was never really allowed to look at them (grubby finger prints and the inability to respect books?) - well here we are with the titan reprints - now with added material from the special editions.

    Ok the book itself - one thing you have to respect about the films - was that they took great lengths to give them a timeless appeal and appearance - there is nothing there that dates the film - think of some films where vehicles, music styles, costumes give the era away that it was filmed it - this gives nothing away and part of that is down to the care and attention given to its designers including the legendary Ralph McQuarrie. These are sumptuous books (there was one for each film) show casing the creative process and progress to the images you see in the film today. They set the way for many other artwork "from the film of..." and to me set the standard for what you should expect

  • Jeff Lanter

    I am going through and re-reading books from my childhood and I'm starting with The Art of Star Wars books. I bought these when they came out and have fond memories of them. The book is two parts: the movie script and the art. As I read through The Art of Star Wars again, I really enjoyed the storyboards, concept art, models used in the movie, and other pieces of art that was produced before the actual movie was shot. It is interesting to see what ideas were kept and rejected for the movie itsel

    I am going through and re-reading books from my childhood and I'm starting with The Art of Star Wars books. I bought these when they came out and have fond memories of them. The book is two parts: the movie script and the art. As I read through The Art of Star Wars again, I really enjoyed the storyboards, concept art, models used in the movie, and other pieces of art that was produced before the actual movie was shot. It is interesting to see what ideas were kept and rejected for the movie itself. Surprisingly, I also really enjoyed the end section about the Special Edition. It gives a little background info on why the changes were made and before and after frames. Since I practically grew up with the Special Edition versions, a reminder of what is new and old is appreciated. This is definitely for serious fans of Star Wars, but I'm glad my warm nostalgia for this book was well-placed.

  • Hank Stuever

    On the one hand, a complete geek-out on the thing that held us all in its Vader-like grip.

    But on the other hand, a great primer on process, visualization, collaboration. My first dawning that all those names on the credits have something important to do, some small piece of a major project. That's a real lesson when you're 12 or so.

  • Shane Amazon

    The Art of Star Wars, Episode IV - A New Hope builds upon the images originally released in the book called The Art of Star Wars in 1979. It does so by adding hundreds of new images from costume designs, production paintings, matte paintings, blueprints, sketches and storyboards. The most interesting images I found in the book are the early character and droid sketches and how they evolved to what we came to see on the screen. This book goes far beyond what some other ART books contain by giving

    The Art of Star Wars, Episode IV - A New Hope builds upon the images originally released in the book called The Art of Star Wars in 1979. It does so by adding hundreds of new images from costume designs, production paintings, matte paintings, blueprints, sketches and storyboards. The most interesting images I found in the book are the early character and droid sketches and how they evolved to what we came to see on the screen. This book goes far beyond what some other ART books contain by giving the reader descriptions and stories that go along with the image on the page. The vast majority of the artwork in the book is from the mind and talents of Ralph McQuarrie. Mr. McQuarrie is best known for his work on the Star Wars Trilogy and his later work on Star Wars Omnibus: Shadows of the Empire and the artwork in the bible at the beginning of Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark. His work earned him a cameo in Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back as General Pharl McQuarrie.

    As noted by some other reviewers the book does have some binding issues. When the book is opened widely you can hear the glue cracking which over time may cause some pages to come unattached. Over all this book is an outstanding production. Recommended.

  • Luis F.

    No es que aporte demasiado: Básicamente es la transcripción de la versión beta del guión de Star Wars Episodio 4, que no difiere mucho de lo que conocemos, así como una recopilación de bocetos y arte conceptual, así como posters e ilustraciones promocionales de La Guerra de las Galaxias , publicados en la fecha de su estreno en distintos paises.

    Aún así, sólo por disfrutar de algunas ilustraciones, en especial las de Ralph McQuarrie, ya es una gozada para los fans de Star Wars :-)

  • Phylicia

    I don't know if it's because that I've seen the movie 100000000 times that I can compare it, but I don't like it

    Like a lot of books vs movies, there's a LOT of different parts that can be deleted, or things are changed, or dialogue is different.

    So many other things, but yeah...annoying

  • Matthias Noch

    While the book contains a lot of drawings and drafts, it provides absolutely no info on the background of these illustrations, how the art-process was working, why some drafts were picked and others not. The text you will find in this book is the script of the movie, what is nice, but not related to the art of SW. It appears that this book is just a mix of graphics and text that was at hand, but together by somebody without any insight into the decision-making regarding the art in SW.

  • K.

    Lackluster on its own, but especially doesn't hold up when compared to the next entry in the series.

    With the text-focus being the script, you don't get much information outside of simple credits/captions.

    Very different feel from just about any other art-of-film book published now.

    There is a certain charm to seeing the simplistic pencil sketches. Like the focus was more on

    than on good-looking, stand-alone art.

    And wow, does Ralph McQuarrie's work stand out all the more in comparison.

    If I ha

    Lackluster on its own, but especially doesn't hold up when compared to the next entry in the series.

    With the text-focus being the script, you don't get much information outside of simple credits/captions.

    Very different feel from just about any other art-of-film book published now.

    There is a certain charm to seeing the simplistic pencil sketches. Like the focus was more on

    than on good-looking, stand-alone art.

    And wow, does Ralph McQuarrie's work stand out all the more in comparison.

    If I had a favorite bit, it would be the computer animation graphics on pages 40-41.


Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.