27 Hours by Tristina Wright

27 Hours

Rumor Mora fears two things: hellhounds too strong for him to kill, and failure. Jude Welton has two dreams: for humans to stop killing monsters, and for his strange abilities to vanish.But in no reality should a boy raised to love monsters fall for a boy raised to kill them.Nyx Llorca keeps two secrets: the moon speaks to her, and she’s in love with Dahlia, her best frien...

Title:27 Hours
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

27 Hours Reviews

  • Katherine Locke

    I was lucky enough to read this early and you guys, it is everything you dreamed of.

    Someone flagged this review so yes, I did receive an early copy from the author but not in exchange for a review. I beta read this and worked on this as a freelancer.

  • Leah

    As one of Tristina Wright's beta readers, I've had the honor and privilege of seeing this story in multiple stages. It has come a long way since the first version I read, and there have been some fundamental plot changes along with little tweaks here and there. But in every form its taken, this story has been incredible.

    27 HOURS is a story of loss and love, family (both by blood and those you make for yourself) and friendship, and finding yourself in the midst of chaos. But above all, this novel

    As one of Tristina Wright's beta readers, I've had the honor and privilege of seeing this story in multiple stages. It has come a long way since the first version I read, and there have been some fundamental plot changes along with little tweaks here and there. But in every form its taken, this story has been incredible.

    27 HOURS is a story of loss and love, family (both by blood and those you make for yourself) and friendship, and finding yourself in the midst of chaos. But above all, this novel is one that explores the morality of humanity. In a world where the color of your skin, your sexuality, your gender, and so much more are of no consequence to anyone, Wright explores the give and take of humanity. She unflinchingly details the selfishness and greed, as well as the love and kindness, and everything in between.

    27 HOURS is not a book that you want to miss.

    ETA: Take a look at

    for critical analysis of the racial rep.

  • Laurie

    27 HOURS by Tristina Wright has everything I could ever want in a YA scifi novel – a visually stunning foreign planet, human space colonies, a fascinating indigenous alien race (LOVE that horns figure into the alien hierarchy), SPACE DRAGONS (with 6 legs!), and action that starts right up and does not let up (Tristina throws her readers right onto her scifi roller coaster and you better hang on). Oh, yeah – and I should probably mention the HOT romance (and the tender romance – I LOVE multiple r

    27 HOURS by Tristina Wright has everything I could ever want in a YA scifi novel – a visually stunning foreign planet, human space colonies, a fascinating indigenous alien race (LOVE that horns figure into the alien hierarchy), SPACE DRAGONS (with 6 legs!), and action that starts right up and does not let up (Tristina throws her readers right onto her scifi roller coaster and you better hang on). Oh, yeah – and I should probably mention the HOT romance (and the tender romance – I LOVE multiple romantic storylines in books). And let’s not forget THE BEST TIMELINE-PROLOGUE I’ve ever read, and the really cool futuristic weaponry (and exciting mode of transport, and breathtaking scenery – there is a whole lot of eye candy in this book - of the setting, alien and human variety). AND…in addition to all this fantasticness, there’s something deeper going on thematically – something beautifully subversive and relevant for our times (as is the case in much of the best scifi). The future of scifi has arrived, friends - and Tristina Wright is blazing the path ahead, speeding past in her spaceship and leaving us all in her spectacular, rainbow-technicolor, intergalactic dust. I know that I will be doing my best to catch up. Sending out much griffin love to this author for her fantastic YA novel (if you hadn’t guessed, I most highly recommend it). P.S. Want the graphic novel AND the movie RIGHT NOW. (And the TEAM GEORGE t-shirt).

  • Eric Smith

    From the diverse, inclusive cast to the non-stop intense action to the visually lush world-building, Tristina Wright's debut has everything I look for in a great YA novel. And I truly can't wait for her second book.

    While reading, I kept thinking how this book read like the best video game I've never played. If anyone at Bioware is listening, please pick up Tristina immediately. Thanks.

  • Aimal (Bookshelves & Paperbacks)

    In all seriousness, this might be one of the most difficult books I’ve had to review, simply because I have so many thoughts. So many different aspects to a novel as complicated and nuanced as this one, and so many thoughts about several of these aspects. More than this, perhaps – the reason why reviewing this book is so difficult is because I can fully see the invaluable benefits of it, as well as the potential harm i

    In all seriousness, this might be one of the most difficult books I’ve had to review, simply because I have so many thoughts. So many different aspects to a novel as complicated and nuanced as this one, and so many thoughts about several of these aspects. More than this, perhaps – the reason why reviewing this book is so difficult is because I can fully see the invaluable benefits of it, as well as the potential harm it can cause, and the intersection of both can be difficult for a reviewer (who isn’t, by any means, claiming to be an expert) to encompass and do justice. But, I will try my best here, and if I start to ramble, resulting in a post that resembles word-vomit more than a structured review- well, you’ll have to forgive me here, I guess.

    is a futuristic (set, I believe, 150-200 years from present day), science-fiction, action-packed tale which counts down from 27 hours to certain war. When the clock hits 0, prompting the sun to come up, our characters’ world is going to be torn apart by the two species fighting on (over?) it.

    The humans consider the chimera blood-thirsty monsters, while the chimera are staunch in their belief that the land is theirs. A third group emerged some time during the war – a forest civilization – that broke away from the humans, formed an alliance with some chimera, and strive for peace.

    I was born and raised in Pakistan, a country that emerged in 1947 from India after a brutal war raged on, killing millions upon millions of people; much of that bloodshed, the consequent splitting, and the after-effects that exist even now were a direct product of the British colonization of the Indian subcontinent. We are still told horror stories, of piles of bodies at the border –

    It was our country, not some colonizers’. They had no right to be there.

    It’s not an issue that raged just then – it’s an issue extremely current and relevant even now, whether we’re talking about the war over Kashmir (again, a direct product of British imperialism), or the Israel-Palestine situation that seems to have no end in sight. Maybe it’s my hypersensitivity to issues of indigenous peoples’ having their lands stolen by invaders who have no right to be there,

    When I realized that the theme of the novel was an indigenous species versus colonists, and the main characters all being colonists or descendants of colonists, I was immediately put off.

    Let me get something straight here:

    What does, however, happen is that all the characters who get perspective chapters are humans (in this case, colonists), and three out of four of the perspective chapters are humans who are learning to rid themselves of long-held prejudices against chimera, while the fourth perspective character is a forest-human who doesn’t have these prejudices anymore, who instead strives for peace. The issue here, at least for me, was glaringly obvious:

    And despite them unlearning their prejudices against the species itself, the issue of invasion and settling is almost entirely ignored, while all the weight is put on violent warfare.

    To me, it parallels a book where white characters realize that people of color are “humans as well,” and start working towards co-existence, while also refusing to (intentionally or unintentionally) acknowledge or dismantle

    . There was a moment in this novel where the villain (so often described as the monster who needs to be destroyed for peace to finally be achieved) says:

    This tells me that Wright is

    Bro, if I’m twenty pages from the end and I’m siding with the villain here? That’s not a good look.

    is a

    We have a truly diverse cast of characters. Our four perspective chapters are Rumor, Nyx, Braeden and Jude, while a fifth character can still be considered a main character, despite not getting a perspective chapter. Rumor is a bisexual, multiracial Nigerian/Portuguese & Indian who falls for Jude, who is gay. Nyx is Deaf, pansexual, chubby, signs ASL throughout the book, has Cuban ancestry, and is in love with her best friend, Dahlia, who is an Afro-Latinx trans girl. Nyx’s abuela is also Deaf. Braeden is asexual, and has two moms. Jude is adopted by a family of two brothers – both are people of color, both are queer. There is an Asian side character who uses they/them pronouns, and there is discussion about using and normalizing pronoun introductions.

    Rumor and Jude form a beautiful bond immediately, and their interactions are lovely to see unfold on the page. Dahlia and Nyx’s complicated romantic relationship is slow-burn, and the pay-off is ultimately swoon-worthy, for lack of a better phrase. Braeden discusses his asexuality often, there is sign language throughout the book – so

    but I’ll get to this later.

    In line with the imperialist discussion I was having above, let’s talk a little bit about

    . I believe Rumor could be considered the driving force of the novel – his perspective chapter starts the novel off, and his actions and reactions are, for the most part, what drive the story. For me, when it was revealed that

    I was immediately intrigued. Why? Because for a story dealing with colonial issues,

    But I was… disturbed (if that’s the right phrase) by the fact that Rumor, more than anyone else,

    Rumor’s past with the indigenous species is bloody; his mother and his father both died during the war, and the book quite literally begins with his colony being wiped out by an attack. So, his reactions are to be expected, but… I’m a little uncomfortable that

    is so staunchly vicious in his hatred of chimera. That’s a strange thematic choice for me. And it gets especially strange (this is a euphemism for problematic, by the way) that the two people who, arguably, have the most sway over changing his prejudices are white.

    Bro. White.

    Is that what you’re thinking? I’ve already acknowledged that perhaps it’s because I’m hypersensitive to imperialist issues, I saw flaws in this novel that many others would have overlooked. But come on – even the most non-interested of you couldn’t say that it isn’t a big deal that

    Like… that’s just… 🏃🏽‍♀️ Moving on.

    You could argue that Rumor’s ancestry isn’t as significant as I’m making it out to be, mainly because

    Which: if the book is set 150-200 years in the future (which is 7-8 generations at most), would people who immigrated from all over the world really have forgotten their language, their cultures? Here’s a passage from the book:

    This seems to imply that

    And that’s fair, if the book was set even further into the future. Would entire cultures cease to exist in just a few generations? (More on this later, too). And even if they did,

    Where romantic, familial and platonic relationships are modeled after Western culture? This is vague, and this is where the holes in world-building start to seep through. Are there no other cultures? And if there aren’t, how did the near-7,000 languages that exist in the world right now get wiped out in just a century or two from now?! How did entire civilizations coming from all over the world forget their own cultures to default to the present “human culture?” How is there no variation past ideological thought (and even then, only as it relates to war versus peace)? And if there are cultures, why not show them? I’m so confused about this –

    that it’s driving me up the wall just thinking about the lack of information there is to grapple with.

    Absolutely nothing, apart from a couple words here and there (and a large chunk of my review *badum tss*). Like I said, there is little to no significant mention of differing cultures, or different languages (the only non-English words in the book are “chai,” “prem,” and “abuela,” which just… make up your mind. Do languages exist, or do they not?) Fine, take away cultures, take away languages, but

    And there is no mention of it. Anywhere. When I say that the characters of color could be replaced by white characters and nothing would change, I mean that quite literally. You’d just have to replace every time the color “brown” is mentioned with white, change the ethnicities, and… that’s it.

    Apparently, in this society,

    Which, just…

    Look at the ethnic cleansing in Myanmar right now, the refugee crisis and the fear-mongering against Middle Easterners and Muslims, the legal and violent war underway against black Americans in the U.S., the purging of Native American lands and rights in today’s society, the discriminatory rhetoric against Mexicans that won someone the election.

    You mean to tell me that a colony, that exists and is an amalgamation of human society from cultures all over the world, has no racism?! Especially if this colony isn’t even that far into the future?! I…

    The only way this could be even slightly possible would be if a scientific device existed that purged the very idea of prejudice out of your mind. I would buy this if prejudice, in and of itself, didn’t exist in the society. But prejudice does exist! Against the indigenous species! So that takes that out of the equation.

    , and have gone through every single day. For a

    It feels like Wright wanted people to say that people of color exist in her book, but didn’t want to do the heavy-lifting of representing the lives of people of color. So with the complete lack of representation of non-white culture, and the insinuation that racism no longer exists, while every other identity is given the proper balance and proper weight? Just… *endless sigh* I’m sorry. It’s lazy. It’s lazy writing, to me. It’s lazy world-building,

    Which is exactly why it was so difficult for me to review this book.

    And not even just that – it’s still a decent book with constant action, well-developed characters, an interesting (albeit under-developed or vague) world, and engaging dialogue. But it still falls flat in so many areas. And I hope that me pointing the things out that made me uncomfortable, that left a bad taste in my mouth doesn’t seem to you that I’m negating all the good this book can do in so many young people’s lives.

    And with that ~3,000 word review…

  • Honest Reviews

    EDIT: Since @nickyoflaherty and others have been tweeting about this and accusing me of lying and faking this review asking for it to be flagged because they don't like that someone didn't like the book and can't stand anyone who goes against their grain, I'm happy to discuss who I got the early version from privately. But since all of the OTHER reviews on here are early version, and they seem to have only an issue with mine... hmmmm!!!!!!!! Seems fishy to me.

    Anyway this is a 100% real review,

    EDIT: Since @nickyoflaherty and others have been tweeting about this and accusing me of lying and faking this review asking for it to be flagged because they don't like that someone didn't like the book and can't stand anyone who goes against their grain, I'm happy to discuss who I got the early version from privately. But since all of the OTHER reviews on here are early version, and they seem to have only an issue with mine... hmmmm!!!!!!!! Seems fishy to me.

    Anyway this is a 100% real review, and you will NOT silence me. I'm sorry if you don't like it, or if you don't like how I got the book. But if my review isn't allowed, neither should any other early reader's review. Just because I don't suck her ass over it doesn't mean my review isn't legitimate just like all the ones who do.

    A friend who read this one early gave me her early digital version of this to share, because she was made uncomfortable by a lot of the content. Not saying who the friend is, because I don't want to start a hater brigade on her. I don't know if there are ARCs out.

    I started in with an open mind, despite already knowing the author personally. Say what you want about her personality, but you have to give people a chance to show you that their art is good. See, this is why I have this account with my others. It's books like this, where I would be too afraid to say what I really think because of the cult of personality surrounding some authors.

    The thing is that Tristina Wright has the ability to be a talented author, but her writer's ego gets in the way. Where her writing might be seen as lush and deep by some, I see the tendency to go for florid overly descriptive writing to hide some flaws in things like plot and characterization. I think it's pretty obvious to the reader why this was published through Entangled, a small press known for mediocre books and poor writing, and not through a better publisher, with more resources. Might have been that this book suffered from poor editing? Because the bare bones of the story are entertaining, but just not very good, or very memorable.

    On the plus side, she's very good at writing catchy and dreamy one liners. I think Tristina should do marketing for other books, because she has a eye for them. Unfortunately, there were too many one liners that didn't link up.

    I'm big on ships and shipping and all of that, yeah yeah I know, but I didn't really care about any of these characters. They didn't feel real to me, and their desires didn't feel real. It all felt flat to me. These characters felt like charicatures.

    But really, there's just nothing memorable about this one. And I think part of this reason is that the author tries so hard. I think when I was 13, I might have swallowed this one up whole. But at 16, I've learned a little about good writing, good storytelling, and this isn't it. For people who don't read as much, I think they might like it.

    In terms of representation, well... you can definitely tell the author is just another bland white woman who was trying very hard. I give her a lot of props for trying, but this is kind of one of those "stay in your lane" deals. I'll let someone else do the big takedown on it because I just don't care, because Entangled isn't known for quality among readers. Part of me wonders if this was the only place that would buy her book?

    She did the best she could with what she had with this story. Sure, she has some talent, but I think it might be for one liners and Twitter rants, and not so much for YA novels.

  • Melanie

    📖🌒: Enter to win a 27 Hours Prize Pack

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    First and foremost, before you read my review, you should check out my amazing friend

    , because it’s an important and eye-opening discussion about colonization and it shouldn’t be ignored.

    In my opinion,

    had so much good, yet so much disappointment, too. This book fa

    📖🌒: Enter to win a 27 Hours Prize Pack

    !

    📖🌘: And check out the rest of the reviews, interviews, and more from this blog tour

    !

    First and foremost, before you read my review, you should check out my amazing friend

    , because it’s an important and eye-opening discussion about colonization and it shouldn’t be ignored.

    In my opinion,

    had so much good, yet so much disappointment, too. This book falls completely down the middle for me. The representation is beautiful and important, but a lot of the romance was too unbelievable for me, which I feel like the twenty-seven-hour time frame really did this book a disservice. Then there is the issue with the colonization that’s very hard to unsee once you’ve seen it, and finally, the only two white main characters in the book do most of the explaining to the main characters of color about what is right. It feels bad, like, really bad.

    Yet, I love that any marginalized teen could pick this book up and see themselves. That, is something I can’t even put a rating on, and I cannot emphasize how important that statement is to me. This book honestly has me feeling very torn.

    is Tristina Wright’s debut novel that follows six teens that live on a moon many years in the future. On this moon, humans have settled into different communities, that specialize in different things, but there were already chimeras and dragons that were indigenous to the moon. After one of the communities are attacked, one of our main protagonists, Rumor, flees to another community to tell them what happened and to warn them that they could be next. All of these teen’s paths eventually cross; some from old friendships, some from old communities, and some from a not talked about forest community that live among the chimeras.

    - Biracial, bisexual, suffering from PTSD.

    - White, gay.

     - Latinx, pansexual, hearing impaired, plus sized.

    - Black, bisexual, transwoman.

    - White, asexual.

    - Asian, genderqueer, hand disfigurement.

    This book has a lot of representation, but this book is so damn queer, which is completely normalized. The world needs more queer stories that aren’t just coming out stories. The world needs a vast array of books, in every genre, that just stars queer characters. Gay, bi, asexual, genderqueer, trans, this book is an unapologetically queer SFF novel, and for that I love it. And I can’t express or emphasize how important each of these characters perspectives are.

    Unfortunately, I think what really hurts this story is the 27 hour time frame. We have characters that have had some horrible things JUST happen, we have characters learning secrets that have been told to them as lies of their entire life, we have characters suffering from exhaustion, we have characters dealing with near death experiences, we have characters fleeing the only homes they have ever known, but somehow all they can think about is sex. And this wasn’t in a scene or two, this was a constant theme in this book. Like, sexual jokes and innuendos and all, when it’s supposed to be a really high tension and scary situation for these teens. If this story would have been stretched out for days or weeks, this would have been fine and enjoyable, but it was just too unbelievable for me in this hour to hour chapter format, and it consistently pulled me from the story.

    Or maybe if there wasn’t as many points of view this would have worked better. Like, if this book only focused on one romantic couple it would have been easier to relate and understand. Instead, we get a Sarah J. Maas, “everyone in my story must be paired up and with romance on the forefront of their minds constantly” story.

    Also, I touched upon this a bit earlier, but Jude is from the forest community and he is pretty much the one that opens everyone’s eyes to their prejudices. There are some good discussions about not using certain words, and things that tie in and make good parallels to our world, but it still felt so bad that the white character had to constantly tell the PoC characters it. And the “quickest adaptor” is also Braedon, the other white character.

    I almost feel like Tristina Wright did so much research and got such amazing feedback for her diverse cast and representation, that no one really helped her with the pacing and structure. Again, this is just my opinion, but I feel like if she changes a few things that the second book in this series could be amazing.

    And obviously the diverse cast and representation was my favorite part of this book. Like, all I want are queer stories in space, and for that I’m very thankful that I was provided an ARC of

    ! Hopefully, if you pick this one up you will enjoy it a little more than I did.

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    Buddy read with

    ! ❤

  • Gabby Olumide

    ***I receive many communications telling me that the author was sending people to flag reviews because she has pulled a Donald Trump and is calling it a fake review because it does not meet her liking. I am not affiliated with the people harassing anyone. I do not own a Twitter. My opinions are mine and I have a right to them. You are trying to silence a WOC to protect a white woman's feelings.

    **I am being harassed by the author regarding my review, so I have changed it to 1 star.

    This was not a

    ***I receive many communications telling me that the author was sending people to flag reviews because she has pulled a Donald Trump and is calling it a fake review because it does not meet her liking. I am not affiliated with the people harassing anyone. I do not own a Twitter. My opinions are mine and I have a right to them. You are trying to silence a WOC to protect a white woman's feelings.

    **I am being harassed by the author regarding my review, so I have changed it to 1 star.

    This was not a good book, and Entangled Publishing is not a good publisher. Harassing me will not change my opinion of your poor pacing, over the top descriptions, or badly edited writing. This had potential, but the author needs help. In more ways than just this.

    The author herself states that there's only a passing reference to the characters ethnicities and the rest of the time they're fighting monsters. To me, that says the much talked about "diversity" and "representation" were intrinsically done for allyship cookies and ass pats.

    There is no real representation here. It's all for show. This is not what my sisters and I need when we are pointed to representation of our people, so please do not say that it is.

    That makes this book complete and utter trash to me.

    You will not silence me or brigade me.

  • destiny ☠ howling libraries

    I put off writing this review for a while, because I couldn't figure out exactly what I wanted to say, or how to say it. This book is being advertised as "queer teens in space", and that's accurate, but that's honestly the least of what this book is

    , and I'd like to tell you why: for anything that any reader may like or dislike about

    , you have to acknowledge that Tristina Wright created a fantasy/sci-fi world in

    I put off writing this review for a while, because I couldn't figure out exactly what I wanted to say, or how to say it. This book is being advertised as "queer teens in space", and that's accurate, but that's honestly the least of what this book is

    , and I'd like to tell you why: for anything that any reader may like or dislike about

    , you have to acknowledge that Tristina Wright created a fantasy/sci-fi world in which white and straight are

    .

    No representation is going to be perfect for every single individual, because marginalized individuals are not a monolith. Queer teens are not a monolith. POC are not a monolith. I can't say the bi rep in this book is perfect for every bi person, but I can say it's perfect for

    , just like

    cannot say this rep is

    (by doing so, you are erasing real people with real experiences).

    That said, Tristina put obvious, concerted efforts into covering as many bases as she could in one book's cast:

    1)

    , who is biracial (Indian/Nigerian) and bisexual

    2)

    , who is hearing impaired, Latinx, pansexual, and chubby

    3)

    , who is black, bisexual, and trans (with no dead name! *cheers*)

    4)

    , who is gay

    5)

    , who is asexual (and possibly panromantic?)

    6)

    , who is gender neutral and uses "they" pronouns

    I have never personally read a book with such a diverse and varied cast, and I loved it so much. I am one of many who has spent years saying, "When are we going to get a SF/F world without racism and homophobia?!" and here it freaking is, and I have to applaud Tristina for it. I only hope that the positive reviews outweigh the negatives well enough for publishing companies to realize how important it is that they start making book deals for books that offer such wide diversity.

    In a nutshell,

    tells a story of teens who have been raised in a society that brainwashed them to believe the indigenous species of Sahara are brutal killing machines that deserve to be wiped out and forced underground at all costs. You learn very quickly - thanks to the perspective of Jude, a forest rebel who was raised in part by the chimera, otherwise termed as "gargoyles" - that this is going to be a series about these teens learning that everything is not as it seems, and that the humans are the monsters here,

    the chimera.

    There's a lot of colonialism at play, and behaviors and arguments that I have heard firsthand in my own life, living in the US - at one point, a character's excuse is, "I wasn't even born yet!" It was sad, but moving, to see colonialism laid out in the text so openly, and really helped put into perspective what a disaster colonists have made of the actual world we live in today.

    Now, for the part of the review I've struggled to put into words: while I enjoyed this story, and was eager to find out what happened next, I found the writing itself to be on a bit of a novice level. I mean this in the nicest way possible, but I used to write role-plays and short stories with online friends as a very young teen, and

    of the writing in this book took me back to those moments.

    There were too many "convenient" moments, the romances weren't incredibly believable at many points, and some of the characters read so similar to one another that the perspective swaps felt muddled. A lot of the banter and dialogue didn't feel authentic. I think Tristina's writing has incredible potential to improve and I will definitely be continuing the series, but I can't call this a five-star read for me.

    You can find this review and more on my blog

    !

  • Emma Giordano

    Update 9/24: I've noticed a lot of discussion about the racial representation & themes of colonialism in this book and I believe this review started said discussion:

    I don't really have anything to say on this topic, especially considering I didn't finish the book myself, but if you're interested in reading a different perspective, you may want to check it out. (And here follows the unnecessary disclaimer that me providing you with a link to a review does not mean I agre

    Update 9/24: I've noticed a lot of discussion about the racial representation & themes of colonialism in this book and I believe this review started said discussion:

    I don't really have anything to say on this topic, especially considering I didn't finish the book myself, but if you're interested in reading a different perspective, you may want to check it out. (And here follows the unnecessary disclaimer that me providing you with a link to a review does not mean I agree with it or that I'm forcing you to read/agree as well. It's just there if you're interested in keeping up with the discussion.)

    Never thought I'd be DNFing a book, but I just have to put this one down. I'm disappointed, not necessarily in the book itself, but because I was SO looking forward to this read and I can't love it as much as I wanted to.

    Unfortunately, this one just wasn't for me. At least right now, I can't seem to get into this book at all. Let me be clear that I don't actually think this book is "bad", but I just have a lot of little problems that are making it too difficult to read and I feel I'm spending too much time trying to love a book that I just *don't*.

    I do actually really like the characters. They aren't my favorite in the world, I don't think they'll stick with me for a long time or that they've made a huge impact on me, but they are good characters. They have their own individual stories and are all intersting to learn about. Of course, this is probably the most diverse cast I've ever read, which is a MAJOR plus. I can't find the exact list of representations in this book but we have a biracial bisexual MC, a cuban/Deaf MC, we have an ace MC, a gay MC, a black-latinx bisexual trans MC, there's just a lot to love about theses characters and I think a lot of people will be pleased with this cast. If you are looking for a diverse science fiction fantasy novel and find yourself getting invested in characters often, I would recommend 27 Hours to you.

    The world-building confused me a lot, and I think that contributed to a lot of why I DNF'ed. I think the story began way to quickly and there wasn't enough time to actually set up how this sci-fi world has evolved. I really could not tell you anything about the world of this book because every bit of information just did not stick with me. I recognize my lack of enjoyment as a possible factor, but I seriously could not describe what a HUB, a colony, a gargoyle, or a chimera is and it made understanding the plot impossible.

    I also felt like it was too obvious that this book was written in 2017? The book takes place hundreds of years into the future, but it felt too tied to modern times. It felt very "picky and choosy" as to which Earth customs were kept and which were left behind which made it feel a bit disjointed and not clean-cut. Personally, if I'm reading a book set in the future, I want to KNOW I'm in the future, and I just didn't feel like the world was separate enough from the world we are living in today. It had all the elements of science fiction, but it honestly felt like an urban-scifi where Earth today was waiting below, unaffected by the events of the story.

    The writing was also very distracting for me. It felt a lot like purple prose where sentences were just too detailed and elaborate to the point of unnecessary. I found myself having to take a break from reading every few paragraphs because I just could not retain anything from the story. I was forgetting details from the top of the page 10 lines in. It became overwhelming and ultimately unenjoyable.

    Honestly, I just don't think 27 Hours is for me. I'd consider giving it another go in the future because I really did want to love it. I definitely do not think this is a bad book whatsoever, there are just a bunch of tiny little things that made the story really difficult for me to read personally.

    To me, this is just one of those things where it was the wrong book for me at the wrong time. I'm not sure if I'd go solely off my experience when deciding to read this book because I think my problems with it are very individual to my reading experience. I really do hope those of you interested in this story pick it up and love it.


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