Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging

Sebastian Junger, the bestselling author of War and The Perfect Storm, takes a critical look at post-traumatic stress disorder and the many challenges today’s returning veterans face in modern society.There are ancient tribal human behaviors-loyalty, inter-reliance, cooperation-that flare up in communities during times of turmoil and suffering. These are the very same beha...

Title:Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging Reviews

  • Diane S ☔

    Proves the adage that good things can come in small packages. In this short book, not a wasted word, Junger combines memoir, journalism and scholarly writing to give us a book that makes one think about where our society has been and where it is heading. Tackles the tough subjects of the rising rate of mental illness and PTSD that many in our society are experiencing. Starting at the beginning with the Native Americans and their society that celebrated communal living. Warning us of the selfishn

    Proves the adage that good things can come in small packages. In this short book, not a wasted word, Junger combines memoir, journalism and scholarly writing to give us a book that makes one think about where our society has been and where it is heading. Tackles the tough subjects of the rising rate of mental illness and PTSD that many in our society are experiencing. Starting at the beginning with the Native Americans and their society that celebrated communal living. Warning us of the selfishness and lack of connection that our way of living has fostered and the results that many continue to live with. Informative and thought provoking, made such alot of sense to me as I am sure it will do for many. So glad I read this one.

  • Shannon

    If you watched the PBS series with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers in the late '80's and read this book, you'll shake your head and realize how right Campbell was simply based on reading and understanding myths. Humans are tribal people, with tens of thousands of years of tribal evolution, myth, and ceremony. Living in an isolated world with a lack of shared stories and myths, with a lack of ceremony, and with a lack of meaningful social structure and social interaction will be our undoing unles

    If you watched the PBS series with Joseph Campbell and Bill Moyers in the late '80's and read this book, you'll shake your head and realize how right Campbell was simply based on reading and understanding myths. Humans are tribal people, with tens of thousands of years of tribal evolution, myth, and ceremony. Living in an isolated world with a lack of shared stories and myths, with a lack of ceremony, and with a lack of meaningful social structure and social interaction will be our undoing unless we act.

    Sebastian Junger opens by stating, "Humans don't mind hardship, in fact they thrive on it; what they mind is not feeling necessary. Modern society has perfected the art of making people not feel necessary. It's time for that to end" (xvii). From not holding babies enough to not sleeping communally or from being an American Indian or a colonist in the 1600's and experiencing the different societal structures therein, Junger analyzes and promotes the importance of community and ponders the dangers of the "communities" in which many in Industrialized and modern countries now live. When speaking in terms of human evolution, those communities aren't recognizable, are woefully isolated, and might just be responsible for some (if not much) of the mental illness we see today.

  • Monica

    **Warning: This review may be longer than the entire book.**

    Interesting and thought provoking; if not entirely convincing. On the one hand, some very compelling ideas about the feeling of smaller, close knit communities and how they can foster and encourage good mental health and enhance happiness. On the other hand, Junger for the most part, blames wealth and technological advances for the moral decline of America. While not without evidence, it's still an arduous climb to get to where he wants

    **Warning: This review may be longer than the entire book.**

    Interesting and thought provoking; if not entirely convincing. On the one hand, some very compelling ideas about the feeling of smaller, close knit communities and how they can foster and encourage good mental health and enhance happiness. On the other hand, Junger for the most part, blames wealth and technological advances for the moral decline of America. While not without evidence, it's still an arduous climb to get to where he wants you to go. Mostly because I'm not exactly sure where he wants to go.

    So this was in the forward:

    I read this as "caveat emptor" aka brace yourself for some unsubstantiated and perhaps unpalatable bull pucky.

    I approached with the appropriate (in my mind) amount of trepidation and what I found was a philosophical potpourri, some of which I suspect to be true (which perhaps demonstrates some bias in me) and some of which details the bias of the author. Junger starts out with a very compelling premise about the nature of communities. His premise boiled down to the idea that smaller, simpler communities were better for mankind in all the ways that matter (spiritually, physically, psychologically). Basically he asserts that the small communities are more egalitarian and force everyone to do their fair share and promotes a view for the common good rather than for self. The bulk of his proof stemmed from the pioneer days where most of the kidnapped settlers ended up preferring the Indian way of life to the European. From the book summary:

    Junger felt like the pioneers had too much technology and materialism.

    And in all honesty, philosophically that resonates with me. Fast forward to modern times with our big cities and high tech and wow have we faltered…

    It is as this point that I remember "caveat emptor" because wow that is some unsubstantiated stuff. Though I can admit that it feels very true, the intellectual part of me that thinks that he's wildly extrapolating and/or misinterpreting studies and data aka manipulating to influence thought, though I can't prove it because he has very few notes. But I enjoyed the journey. Junger goes on to say that natural disasters and warfare (in other words stressors) make communities closer and more egalitarian. No he is not advocating for war, he is presenting an observation:

    According to Junger (and it again "feels" true)

    He by the way seems to think that being poor is in the realm of natural disaster and warfare (again "feels" true, but also biased and unsubstantiated)

    But things get a little tilted as Junger continues to assault modern society

    and,

    and,

    and,

    It's at this point that Junger tries to tie the concept of tribalism to military veterans specifically those with PTSD. While I think he had some interesting concepts about the nature of mankind in small communities versus the cities today, I really think he struggled with trying to link veterans. I understand his point about military units being a bit like tribes and how most members of the unit are more concerned with the success of their comrades than themselves. As an ex-military member I know this to be similar to my own experiences. However Junger takes it to a very weird place. Ostensibly he is talking about the type of communities that the veterans return to.

    Junger seems to be talking almost exclusively about combat veterans not the entire military, however he doesn't seem to know there is a distinction. His references are to a shared trauma that binds veterans but he also has this rather stunning negativity towards veterans.

    and those folks familiar with Hillbilly Elegy may find this thinking a little familiar:

    Essentially, he's saying that veterans are not that different than other traumatic experiences in life and he's not sure they deserve special dispensation.

    In Jungers view, being a warrior is just another job within the community (tribe) and should be treated in the same way as other occupations. Again, incredibly thought provoking, and again "feels" like a ton of manipulation of data and intellectual bullying to arrive there.

    A lot of what Junger said resonated with me. But I read enough to know he was catering to my biases in order to arrive at a place that he wanted to go. Frankly there was a lot of hidden messaging in the book that I picked up on. The contention that a "good" community is a small community where everyone only does things that help the community. Smacks of two things, isolationism and rural America is the only America that counts with just a smidgen of white nationalism. Also throughout the book there was a bit of an assertion of masculinity. There's the statement that

    or the

    The book is peppered with such examples that indicate to me that Junger is concerned about the patriarchy. By the way, all of the veterans that he refers to are men. My earworm reading this book was

    Yes, I know that isn't the real lyric. Look, it's my earworm…

    It's a short read that is well worth a look, but with a watchful eye...

    Read on my kindle.

  • Allison Scott

    There are many good ideas in this book, including disorders of trauma as disorders of integration, isolation, and group dynamic, however I had too many issues with the way this story was told to fully embrace the important message it meant to convey.

    When I read “tribe” in this book, I imagine only men. Men at war, men at work at construction sites, male aggression, and male friendship. Where are the women? His main example of a “female” style of leadership is about … MEN! (The dual roles taken b

    There are many good ideas in this book, including disorders of trauma as disorders of integration, isolation, and group dynamic, however I had too many issues with the way this story was told to fully embrace the important message it meant to convey.

    When I read “tribe” in this book, I imagine only men. Men at war, men at work at construction sites, male aggression, and male friendship. Where are the women? His main example of a “female” style of leadership is about … MEN! (The dual roles taken by men stuck in a collapsed coal mine.) If what Junger implies is true and there are differences to the gender roles in close-knit societies, especially in times of stress, I would like to read more about the female experience and female sacrifice. Even in the Bosnian war story, Ahmetasevic’s quotes were largely centered around the men, taking no account of what the women did when they were alone. The military, for example, would be a fantastic place to expand on the leadership roles and altruistic behavior of women. Yes, historically the military has been a male-dominated institution, however when he is talking about contemporary PTSD statistics, we have to recognize the existence of women in the military. This could have been a chance to explore the potential further isolation caused by being women in a historically “man’s world.” Do they fare better on return because of their female friendships and support systems? Or do they fare worse, because we tend to ignore the existence of female veterans, as this book does? By not discussing women, he misses a potential opportunity to strengthen his argument. If we are to truly become the functioning society that Junger imagines - communal and supportive - I should hope we include the experiences of both/all genders.

    Additionally, Junger fails in his attempts to invoke science to support his claims by either being inconsistent with his analogies or getting the analogies wrong altogether. In the chapter, War Makes you an Animal, I struggle to understand if Junger believes that the “tribe” society is an animal behavior, or a human one. In a confusing misuse of biology, he sites group selection as a basis for altruism, an idea generally discredited by evolutionary biologists, except in eusocial animals like bees, ants, or termites (see Dawkins’ “Selfish Gene”; John Maynard Smith 1964; Abbott et al 2011). By writing, “[altruistic choices] are profound acts of selflessness that distinguish us from all other mammals, including the higher primates we are so closely related to,” and that “risking male lives to save female lives makes enormous evolutionary sense,” Junger claims that it is the evolutionary course that pushed humans toward acts of heroism, as we have evolved past our close relations towards greater group unity. But, at the same time, he writes, “virtually all mammals seem to benefit from companionship; even lab rats recover more quickly from trauma if they are caged with other rats rather than alone.” This is true because, as scientists who study them know, rats are social mammals, however many mammals (male deer, most big cats, etc.) are predominantly solitary, and prefer to be. So, I still don’t understand, is being part of a tribe what makes us animals? Or makes us human? In another, unrelated, but equally vexing quote, Junger describes a “state of hyperarousal” as having a “firm basis in the neurobiology of the brain.” A vague hand waving in the direction of an authority called “science,” though this fact means nothing without further discussion.

    It is too bad Junger doesn’t research the science as thoroughly as researches the history of war and experiences of soldiers. It has made the reading much less enjoyable than I had anticipated picking it up.

  • Michael

    Junger has an appealing message. That humans have evolved a high order of altruism associated with our tribal social nature which leads us to be willing to take great risks to save another member of the tribe. In many circumstances people are willing to sacrifice themselves for total strangers. Time and again when disasters like earthquakes occur the vast majority of people relinquish all sense of selfishness and pitch in to help. In specific examples like the Blitz of daily bombing of London by

    Junger has an appealing message. That humans have evolved a high order of altruism associated with our tribal social nature which leads us to be willing to take great risks to save another member of the tribe. In many circumstances people are willing to sacrifice themselves for total strangers. Time and again when disasters like earthquakes occur the vast majority of people relinquish all sense of selfishness and pitch in to help. In specific examples like the Blitz of daily bombing of London by the Luftwaffe, the Bosnia civil war, or Nova Scotian miners of Springhill trapped underground, all sense of class and racial distinctions disappear, and a special form of teamwork emerges that expands upon our tribal nature. Qualitative differences may be seen between more immediate physical actions to save others and a more persistent empathetic form of moral courage, roles that often are filled by men and women, respectively. Our tribalism is tied up with a capability to wage war, and, as he emphasized in his outstanding book on an American company fighting in Afghanistan, “War”, the men were sustained in their heroic efforts from their bonds with their immediate buddies and peers and not from a sense of fighting for their country. When the special state of unity is lost with the return from war or the recovery of society from a natural disaster, the recovery from trauma is tragically challenged by the relative isolation and alienation of modern society compared to hunter gatherer societies. PTSD abounds. We can’t go back to living like Native Americans or bushmen of the Kalihari, but we could do a better job in socially validating the experience of those who fight in our wars or survive disasters.

    For many these ideas may come across as fresh and accessible. For me as a former scientist I am wary about sweeping generalizations about the foundations of phenomena like altruism, mental illness, and war. The evolution of social behavior is a speculative enterprise, and the diagnosis of the fundamental ills of our present society on the basis of poorly founded inferences about the biology of human nature needs either a more humble outlook or a more systematic construction of argument. Junger adds a bibliography of studies in the back of the book, but rarely makes reference to them in any critical way. Still, I do like the fermentation of ideas and courage of arguments in an essay on important topics like these.

  • Petra Eggs

    Yesterday I had a friend request saying that he didn't want to friend me just to tell me that he objected to my review being so prominent when it was wrong, crap etc. as the author hadn't meant what I said. I didn't read the rest of the long wodge of no doubt insulting text but the ending was that he was flagging the review. I ignored his FR and wrote back tl;dr. He replied (although I don't know how he got through the privacy settings and blocks) some more troll stuff and that I was wron

    Yesterday I had a friend request saying that he didn't want to friend me just to tell me that he objected to my review being so prominent when it was wrong, crap etc. as the author hadn't meant what I said. I didn't read the rest of the long wodge of no doubt insulting text but the ending was that he was flagging the review. I ignored his FR and wrote back tl;dr. He replied (although I don't know how he got through the privacy settings and blocks) some more troll stuff and that I was wrong, bad etc. I replied that he failed to understand that reviews on Goodreads were opinions and my interpretation,my opinion was as good as anyone else's. But I should have written how did he know what Junger 'really' meant? Was he clairvoyant or what? Actually I should have kittenised him, always drives trolls hair-tearing insane.

    _______

    Junger has his head in the clouds about Native American tribes. Their life was so idyllic that even white prisoners would refuse to return to their communities etc. It's all so... romantic and New Age and spiritual and even paleo. He ignores the fact that each tribe had a different culture and a great many were warlike and peace was often kept between different tribes because their methods of torture were so extreme. Similarly the position of women within the tribes varied from near-equality to utter subjugation. But then Junger is not concerned about women at all, this, like

    is a book about men.

    Junger is better discussing the troops coming home from Afghanistan and the Middle East with the difficulties of adjustment necessary when moving from the tribe of the military, a 'boy's club' back into the mainland and family 'tribe' and especially if they had been physically or psychologically damaged.

    The book, to me, was not in the same class as the absolutely brilliant almost flawless

    .

  • Clif Hostetler

    This book provides a convincing articulation of reasons why modern society is ill suited to the innate social needs of homo sapiens (i.e. human beings). Our ancestors lived—and evolved—many thousands of years in hunter gatherer groups that were closely bonded together in a cooperative bond in order to survive dangerous surroundings. Everybody in the group knew that they were dependent on others, and the group expected loyalty, cooperation, and sharing of resources from individuals in the group.

    This book provides a convincing articulation of reasons why modern society is ill suited to the innate social needs of homo sapiens (i.e. human beings). Our ancestors lived—and evolved—many thousands of years in hunter gatherer groups that were closely bonded together in a cooperative bond in order to survive dangerous surroundings. Everybody in the group knew that they were dependent on others, and the group expected loyalty, cooperation, and sharing of resources from individuals in the group.

    Modern society in contrast emphasizes competitive individualism, and the sharing of resources is generally limited to the family and sometimes extended family. The mismatch between this modern environment and innate human social needs can lead to clinical depression, anxiety and chronic loneliness.

    The book begins with observations made by American colonialists that there was something about the life of the indigenous peoples that was very attractive to some people of European ancestry. Benjamin Franklin observed the phenomenon in 1753, writing, “When an Indian child has been brought up among us, taught our language and habituated to our customs, yet if he goes to see his relations and make one Indian ramble with them, there is no persuading him ever to return.” In contrast to this there were many examples of kidnapped young whites who after living with the native Americans for several years did not want to return to white Colonial life. Colonial society was richer and more advanced, and yet people were voting with their feet the other way.

    On a personal note let me mention here that I had an ancestor who was taken captive during the French-Indian War and resisted returning to "civilized" life.

    is to my review of a historical novel based upon the facts of my ancestor's life.

    Next the book moves on to various examples of war and times of great stress during which rates of depression dropped, differences in status were erased, and a spirit of cooperation prevailed. The examples include the

    and

    . In these and other cases the author quotes people who lived through these horrific events who expressed nostalgia for the spirit of group common purpose that prevailed at the time.

    What those events have in common with aboriginal tribal life is the low differences in status and wide spread sharing of resources. These conditions are lacking in modern industrial societies.

    Then the book moves on to the experiences of American soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. The prevalence of PTSD is way off the charts. The book explains that PTSD is primarily a maladjustment of return to American society. Veterans suffering from PTSD are having difficulty separating the danger of war from its pleasures. Returning soldiers are leaving an environment of group living where they have been sleeping and working together while being surrounded by danger. A close-knit group of fellow warriors returning to a highly individualised and fractured civilian world is “deeply brutalising to the human spirit”.

    The author then explains reasons why American life is probably the most difficult society in the world for a combat veteran to return to. He compares the incidence of PTSD in Americans with veterans of other nations—Israel in particular—and then explains reasons for the differences.

    The author points to the American disparity of wealth and income and the lack of jobs for returning soldiers as glaringly examples of lack of sharing and support in our society that differentiates it from a tribal society. The author makes scathing comments regarding the money market and fund managers who wrecked the economy in 2008 and received bonuses instead of prison sentences.

    The contrast described in this book between what's needed and what's actually provided to the returning soldier I found to be emotionally moving. Surprisingly, the author suggests that saying "thank you for your service" makes matters worse by reinforcing the differences between civilians and military. If you want to understand the author's reasoning on this issue I suggest you read the book rather than asking me to explain.

    Here's a link to a N.Y. Times article written by David Brooks published August 9, 2016 titled "The Great Affluence Fallacy" in which he references this book:

    I first learned about this book from the above article.

    Here's a link to another N.Y. Times article on a related subject titled "How Social Isolation Is Killing Us."

  • Otis Chandler

    A fascinating book about community and belonging, and how modern society has moved us away from our roots in potentially signifiant ways. The book opens with a thought provoking fact: in early America, there were numerous instances of white people joining primitive, native Indian societies - but zero instances of the opposite, because "the intensely communal nature of an Indian tribe held an appeal that the material benefits of Western civilization couldn’t necessarily compete with."

    The book als

    A fascinating book about community and belonging, and how modern society has moved us away from our roots in potentially signifiant ways. The book opens with a thought provoking fact: in early America, there were numerous instances of white people joining primitive, native Indian societies - but zero instances of the opposite, because "the intensely communal nature of an Indian tribe held an appeal that the material benefits of Western civilization couldn’t necessarily compete with."

    The book also argues that the wealth we enjoy in modern society is isolating, against the grain of millions of years of our evolution, and can lead to depression, because our happiness is in large part rooted in a need to feel connected to others. While this feels right and intuitive, it doesn't seem to be the way we are optimizing our lives.

    "A wealthy person who has never had to rely on help and resources from his community is leading a privileged life that falls way outside more than a million years of human experience. Financial independence can lead to isolation, and isolation can put people at a greatly increased risk of depression and suicide. This might be a fair trade for a generally wealthier society— but a trade it is."

    Another loss the book points out is the loss of the transparency and social justice that being in a small community used to bring. When your neighbors and community members all know each other and what is going on with each other, group peer pressure tends to reward good actions and punish bad ones. The book points out that people wouldn't for instance cheat unemployment if their neighbors were paying for it and everyone knew what was happening. In anonymity we have lost a sense of responsibility to each other.

    Another data point about the power of human connection that a disaster, such as a war, can bring to a society.

    , saying "Time and time again in history, civilians have forged incredibly strong bonds in the face of wars and earthquakes and floods and gone on to miss those heady times of cooperation. Also demonstrating the power of bonding is the fact that one of the most devastating thing a soldier can face is the loss of a buddy.

    The book basically concludes that the

    . This is something worth giving a lot of thought in terms of our priorities.

  • Louise

    Sebastian Junger poses that tribal societies had a strong sense of community and fairness because these values were necessary to survive. He poses that while tribal culture buffered its members against catastrophic loss (illness, death, violent weather) its sense of community was protection from what today we call PTSD. He makes his case mostly through anecdotes and a few statistics.

    While there is a lot of food for thought in Junger’s anecdotes they have alternative interpretations. For instanc

    Sebastian Junger poses that tribal societies had a strong sense of community and fairness because these values were necessary to survive. He poses that while tribal culture buffered its members against catastrophic loss (illness, death, violent weather) its sense of community was protection from what today we call PTSD. He makes his case mostly through anecdotes and a few statistics.

    While there is a lot of food for thought in Junger’s anecdotes they have alternative interpretations. For instance, the introductory example was that colonials captured by Native Americans opted to stay with the tribe when freed, while Indians captured by settlers always wanted to return to their tribe. Tribal bonds may not be the sole reason. Other possible reasons: perhaps settlers had no home to return to. Female captives might have to leave children behind. Reasons Native Americans would want to return to the tribe could have been experiences with racism, preference for hunting vs. farming and not having the tools for settler society such as fluency in English, literacy and access to money.

    Like the anecdotes, some data has wide open holes. The increasing isolation of modern life is not the only reason for the increase in PTSD, rising fraud in government programs such as Medicare or the decrease in crime at the time of natural disasters, but how big a role does it play?

    There is a long (for the size of the book) list of resources, but the items are not footnoted to any of the content in the book.

    Despite the breezy arguments, the thesis is worth thinking about. Why would a Sarajevo survivor miss living in those dangerous days? What are the differences of today’s soldiers returning from today’s battle theaters from those of previous wars? Are wars and catastrophes the only the causes of people pulling together in modern life?

  • Sam Quixote

    Is Western civilization the pinnacle of human achievement? In Tribe, Sebastian Junger questions this notion by looking at, among other examples, why colonial Americans left behind the burgeoning settlements to live with the tribal Indians; why, as technological advances have sped up over time (and accelerate still faster today), we are all “connected” and yet more and more of us feel isolated, depressed and unsatisfied with life in the Information Age; and why comfort is killing us and, rather t

    Is Western civilization the pinnacle of human achievement? In Tribe, Sebastian Junger questions this notion by looking at, among other examples, why colonial Americans left behind the burgeoning settlements to live with the tribal Indians; why, as technological advances have sped up over time (and accelerate still faster today), we are all “connected” and yet more and more of us feel isolated, depressed and unsatisfied with life in the Information Age; and why comfort is killing us and, rather than avoiding it, hardship and intense trauma like war can be the greatest and most cherished experiences life can offer.

    Loved it. Sebastian Junger’s done it again (check out his last book, War, for an equally remarkable and powerful read)! Tribe is a fantastic book that’s very relevant to our time, containing a lot of useful insights on our turbulent era.

    Junger manages to tackle the enormously complex and deeply important issue of societal disconnection, and break it down clearly, accessibly and compellingly. His thesis is that humans need three main things to be happy: struggle, community and purpose, and that the lack of these things in the West is why so many people today feel unfulfilled and directionless.

    And it’s a convincing argument, backed up with several fascinating examples. Junger covered the Bosnian war back in the ‘90s and went back to Sarajevo to interview the survivors who said that was the happiest time of their lives! Everyone was forced to live together, pool their resources so they could all survive, and all other worries were pushed aside as peripheral. And this is a sentiment echoed from survivors of the Blitz in WW2 to soldiers from the most recent Gulf war. There are also studies showing depression and suicide decrease in the wake of tragedies like 9/11 or devastating natural disasters.

    And it’s because you’re suddenly and viscerally reminded how small and trivial everyday bullshit is when you’re surrounded by death, deprivation and suffering and you realise what’s important is your common humanity with others around you. Junger talks about the military’s “brotherhood of pain” where soldiers are united by their circumstances which goes back to the plains Indians with their clearly defined roles and how there is a base need for this kind of close unity with others and a shared purpose in all humans. This need is ignored by most people in the West today to our psychological, emotional and physical detriment. In the words of anthropologist Sharon Abramowitz, today “we are an antihuman society”.

    The most striking observation Junger makes is how Western society needs to more fully recognise the military as part of the everyday rather than single it out as separate and other. He mentions how in other cultures, like in Israel where military service is mandatory, there’s far less post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) because that aspect of their society is a big part of ordinary life. Whereas in America soldiers are very clearly singled out, for better or worse, and that this distinction can be harmful when it comes to reintegrating back into civilian life.

    Because life is too comfortable now and most people don’t suffer violence or trauma (at least not on the same level as soldiers), we highlight those who do and view them as unfortunate victims, making them feel alienated from the rest of us. Obviously there are legitimate cases of PTSD among veterans but if the idea that all veterans are assumed to be victims with PTSD, it almost forces them into the role of victims in order to claim disability (disability claims have gone up inordinately for vets while casualties have gone down). This renders them useless going forward because they won’t be able to have jobs and disconnects them further from society and the country they fought for. Junger poetically notes that while these people were willing to die for their country, they don’t know how to live for it.

    Even if you don’t agree with Junger’s conclusions, which I absolutely do - and it’s hard not to, particularly with the recent case of the Las Vegas shootings; who else but someone so profoundly disconnected from his fellow man could do something so unthinkably brutal? And that’s just the latest atrocity - mass shootings have been an American fixture for decades now! - it’s worth taking to heart the egalitarian message. To make your community better for everyone by caring beyond our immediate family and close circle of friends, to stop focusing on our differences and look to our similarities, and realize that we could learn from less “civilized” societies, that the West haven’t gotten everything right.

    Technological change is great but it’s a mixed blessing; in many ways it’s made our lives better and, in some, worse. And as technology continues to rapidly change, year after year, it’s worth remembering that human nature doesn’t change as fast and that we shouldn’t ignore our basic nature and needs. Struggle and recognise it - you’re alive, this is temporary, so live while you have the chance. Help others because it’s right or for no other reason than to make yourself feel better. And in those actions, you’ll find purpose and satisfaction.

    I could go on a lot more but I’ll stop here and encourage you to read it for yourself, that is if any of this struck a chord. I found Tribe to be a fascinating, brilliant book full of thoughtful new ideas (to me at least) and rewarding and enlightening information with an inspiring message at its core.


Books Finder is in no way intended to support illegal activity. We uses Search API to find the overview of books over the internet, but we don't host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners, please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them. Read our DMCA Policies and Disclaimer for more details.