The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

The Nowhere Girls

Three misfits come together to avenge the rape of a fellow classmate and in the process trigger a change in the misogynist culture at their high school transforming the lives of everyone around them in this searing and timely story.Who are the Nowhere Girls?They’re everygirl. But they start with just three:Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of t...

Title:The Nowhere Girls
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The Nowhere Girls Reviews

  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)

    See more of my reviews on

    ! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via Edelweiss.

    Y’all, by the time you read this, I’ve been sitting on this review since June 2017.

    Maybe it caught me at the right time or maybe it’s just that good, but

    struck me right in my feminist heart at a time I really needed it to keep going. It’s not an emotionally easy book to read, as you might expect from any book with rape and sexism

    See more of my reviews on

    ! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via Edelweiss.

    Y’all, by the time you read this, I’ve been sitting on this review since June 2017.

    Maybe it caught me at the right time or maybe it’s just that good, but

    struck me right in my feminist heart at a time I really needed it to keep going. It’s not an emotionally easy book to read, as you might expect from any book with rape and sexism at its center, but it’s a fantastic read for the modern teenage activist.

    Our three narrators lend the book a weight often missing from similarly themed books through their representation of groups often neglected by mainstream feminism: fat women (Grace), queer women of color (Rosina), and disabled/neurodivergent women (Erin). After years of the school’s football players–especially one jerk named Spencer–getting away with sexual assault and harassment, what becomes a movement girls across the county know about starts with one event: Grace moving to itty bitty Prescott from Seattle. She happens to move into the home that once housed a high school pariah named Lucy.

    Once, before Grace arrived, three football players raped Lucy. After the event, those three and then others harassed her and harangued her until she couldn’t take it anymore–and she wasn’t the only one to suffer at the boys’ hands. When Grace finds Lucy’s desperate words carved on the walls of her new home and learns what happened to her, she’s determined to do something. With the help of her new friend Rosina, who’s also furious about Lucy’s fate, and Erin, they start a movement simply called The Nowhere Girls. What starts with a handful of girls who get meeting info from an email inflames an entire town in scandal.

    All they do is make it publicly known the boys will not be getting any sex until they start showing the girls some respect. It’s a big, grandstanding act that doesn’t actively do anything to fight the rampant sexism in town. White feminism material? Absolutely. But the boys and even the school administrators are so

    by the mere idea of resistance that change happens.

    (Almost the exact thing happened to me in elementary school: I made it be known I’d put a note like “I feel like crying when you bully me. Will you please stop bullying me?” in my fourth grade bully’s valentine but forgot to actually do it. She was so mad at me she wrote a nasty note in the valentine she gave

    , which got her a referral. Sometimes, you don’t have to do anything but talk.)

    But like I said, it’s an entirely fair criticism to look at the Nowhere Girls and call what they’re doing white feminism. The book actually include short perspectives from a trans girl named Adele and an unnamed black girl who voice valid criticism of the movement. The schoolgirls who attend the Nowhere Girls meetings are overwhelmingly white and cis; they mostly sit around talking instead of doing anything.

    And like I said, the mere existence of their resistance is what brings about change! It’s so odd to see such a White Feminism way of changing things do so well in regards to intersectional feminism and I love it.

    But make no mistake, The Nowhere Girls is not a book for those triggered by sexism, sexual abuse/assault, and racism. See, one of our three narrators has her own history of sexual abuse in her past. We also get snippets from an MRA/pickup artist blog run by one of Lucy’s rapists and it is

    . I was prepared and can regularly stomach the vile diatribes spotlighted on We Hunted the Mammoth, the blog excerpts are still nasty enough to choke you. They have a purpose, but you’ll still want to be prepared.

    And the racism? Well, the principal quickly decides Rosina is the mastermind behind the Nowhere Girls. Though she’s partially correct, her choice of suspect comes solely from racism. Because Rosina is the Angry Latina Girl in a very white town, she most be behind it, right? She goes as far as threatening Rosina with expulsion and exposure of her grandmother’s immigration status as well as lying to Rosina’s mother about her being on drugs. Those are not the acts of a fair principal and they’re also not that surprising. Despite being a woman herself, the principal commits to complicity with the system with every move she makes against Rosina, the queer girl of color.

    Sadly, I can’t remark on the quality of Erin’s character and how her Asperger’s is written. I don’t know enough Aspies to be a fair judge and don’t know if Reed has an Aspie reader for the book. Someone else who knows better will have to take on that job.

    If you haven’t already figured it out,

    is one dark book. Reading it is like sinking slowly into a massive hole filled with mud. Right when you’re about to go under, a hand reaches out to you and pulls you out. The crushing despair most of the book put into me lifted more and more the closer I got to the end until it felt like the world was good and just again. Is it a bit of a fantasy? Yeah, I can see that criticism and call it valid too. But for those of us who will never get justice for one reason or another, it feels good.

    The one blemish on the otherwise great The Nowhere Girls: transphobia. Early on in the book, a character in Jesse says a very transphobic thing while trying to be the good brother of a trans boy. His quote: “If I decided I wanted to be a chick.”

    No one DECIDES they WANT to be a different gender. Trans people are born the gender they are but get designated the wrong gender. I get the intent of the passage–it’s in the context of explaining that if he were, say, Jessie Camp instead of Jesse Camp, he would have a much harder time due to transmisogyny–but the phrasing is so, so important. Just change it to “if I were a trans girl” or something similar that doesn’t imply being trans is a choice.

    Anyway, nothing is ever said about it. He turns out to be friends with one of Lucy’s rapists, but then he’s kinda redeemed when he tries to help the girls report Spencer for rape. After that, he fades into the background.

    Honestly, I want to call Erin, Grace, and Rosina the Angels of Prescott, not the Nowhere Girls. Their admittedly passive activism on behalf of a girl who is far away from them puts Spencer’s victims on the road to getting justice. And we do get a peek at how Lucy is doing at the very end, by the way. That sweet touch at the end of such a dark book makes everything feel worthwhile.

    For the love of God, just steel yourself and read this book if the sexual abuse/assault, racism, and sexism won’t be too much for you. I’ve gone on for a thousand words and could go on for a thousand more, but it boils down to

  • Jessie

    I want to add a disclaimer that I am a white cisgender heterosexual woman. I am not autistic. I am not an immigrant. I have not been raped. I cannot speak to the accuracy with which these topics are portrayed. I'm excited to hear from other readers if they feel these topics were described accurately and respectfully.

    * * *

    This book was powerful. It made me feel validated, that the

    I want to add a disclaimer that I am a white cisgender heterosexual woman. I am not autistic. I am not an immigrant. I have not been raped. I cannot speak to the accuracy with which these topics are portrayed. I'm excited to hear from other readers if they feel these topics were described accurately and respectfully.

    * * *

    This book was powerful. It made me feel validated, that the sexism I experience is real and is wrong. It made me feel empowered to do something about it. But also sad that it was necessary, and humbled by the experiences others go through that I will never truly understand. I felt I left with a better understanding of other women and the different ways they experience sex, rape culture, and feminism. This book doesn't tell you what's right or what the correct way to fight is; it shows you what different people experience and encourages you to support other women in their own choices.

    Erin has Asperger's. She schedules her day to the minute and doesn't let her foods touch and speaks what she's thinking. She loves science, especially biology. She loves Star Trek. She doesn't break rules.

    I can't speak to how accurate the author portrays Asperger's, but I really enjoyed reading Erin's chapters. It does a great job of showing the struggle of mental illness. The exhaustion of dealing with everyone who just wants you to act "normal". The amount of work you put in only for everyone to think you're not trying hard enough.

    Rosina seems to both hate how people treat her because of her race, as well as hate her own heritage. As the oldest girl in a large Mexican family, she's expected to babysit the kids and work in the family restaurant. She hates that no matter how much work she puts in, she is accused of not caring about the family at even the smallest hint of having her own wants.

    Rosina is gay. She hates how men often take her sexual orientation as a challenge. But she has the biggest crush on one of the school cheerleaders and it is just the sweetest and most adorable thing to read.

    Grace is the new student. Due to her mother's change of faith to a more liberal view of Christianity, Grace lost all her friends in her old Baptist community. She worries that she's invisible, replaceable. If it was so easy for her friends to shun her, did she even matter? Grace takes a religious view on feminism, trying to do what's right as she believes Jesus would, while also creating a place for herself in her new school.

    Besides the main characters, the author gives a voice to the background characters, to the trans girls and non-binary teens, to the girls who made it through rehab, the girls who want to go to med school, the girls who are insecure about their weight. And because the author presents so many voices, we hear many different opinions about the events in the book. There are girls who love sex and girls who think it's a chore. Girls who are saving themselves for marriage. Girls who don't believe rape culture exists and girls who think all men are animals. Girls who were raped but no one believes them. Girls who don't want to call what happened to them rape. Girls who want to fight back but can't because when Black girls fight back they're seen as dangerous. The author doesn't tell you what to believe. She shows you the different beliefs and helps you understand them.

    There's an awkward conversation where a boy talks about his "sister--I mean my brother" who transitioned two years ago (surely two years is long enough to be getting the words right). He complains about the double standard, that it's okay for his brother to transition to male but if he tried transitioning to female, his parents would never accept it. Your brother transitions and all you have to say about it is how it's not fair that you couldn't transition if you wanted to, even though you don't want to?

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  • Brenda Ayala

    Me too.

    There has been a lot of talk in the news recently about sexual harassment. A hotshot movie exec had more than ten women come forward to explain what he had done to them.

    As a result, a small movement started: write “me too” if you have ever experienced sexual harassment. Maybe then people will see how many are truly affected.

    The Nowhere Girls came at a prime moment. It encompasses the Me Too movement completely—girls and women uniting for a cause: to show that something is far too prevale

    Me too.

    There has been a lot of talk in the news recently about sexual harassment. A hotshot movie exec had more than ten women come forward to explain what he had done to them.

    As a result, a small movement started: write “me too” if you have ever experienced sexual harassment. Maybe then people will see how many are truly affected.

    The Nowhere Girls came at a prime moment. It encompasses the Me Too movement completely—girls and women uniting for a cause: to show that something is far too prevalent, and to show that anyone who has experienced it is not alone.

    It’s a heavy book, but it’s necessary. I badly wish that some girls had the support that Erin, Grace and Rosina provided. More than anything I wish those girls didn’t have to experience the hurt at all.

    Times are changing, and this novel will help. The more we educate girls on their strength and boys on their control, the less we need these types of voices. For now, we still need them. And this one is a powerful voice with both hopelessness and hope; guilt and redemption. Aspergers and homosexuality are not crutches, and women have voices.

  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)

    I really loved this book so much!

    is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Ro

    I really loved this book so much!

    is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Rosina Suarez as they come together to challenge the rape culture that forced a girl to move out of town after accusing three popular students of rape. The Nowhere Girls grows into a movement that changes the lives of the student body as more girls come together and support each other.

    I really loved

    , she’s the first main character we’re introduced to and I immediately liked her. She feels incredibly amounts of empathy and truly wants the best for people and for justice and fairness to be realities, but she is prepared to fight for them.

    was another of the main characters and I loved her so SO MUCH. I loved that we got to see a main character with Asperger's. We really get to know her, not just who she is on the spectrum. We see how she views relationships and lives her daily life - what she loves, what she fears. I loved her passion for science (something we do not share, but I could feel how much she loved it). I loved how she talked about how asperger’s presents itself differently in girl and goes overlooked. I love that she challenges the idea that people on the spectrum are emotionless and lack empathy - they just process and confront situations differently. Erin was just awesome and so strong and amazing.

    is so fantastic! She is so unapologetic and brave. I love that she completely lets Erin be herself and supports her - their friendship was fantastic. She is so selfless for her family even when she’s unhappy. She also has a very adorable wlw romance with former cheerleader, Melissa that is so sweet and cute.

    The

    that develops between the 3 main girls, Grace, Rosina, and Erin, was awesome and I loved every minute of it. The support that develops from the Nowhere Girls was inspiring and gave you hope that things can get better.

    I really loved all the

    . They were all clear and distinct, but create a vibrant and unified story of trying to take agency and power in a system that works against them. The group talked about power, choice, double standards, solidarity and we see how girls experiences and beliefs differ - and even see some talking about the white privilege in the group, how they are seen as powerful crusaders not angry black women. The group is a very collaborative movement with no one trying to overshadow others. And I loved seeing girls coming together to support other girls in the only way they knew how. I also liked that we get to see them call out guys for doing nothing as perpetuating rape culture, not just guys who rape, and some guys actually acknowledge this and change.

    I really loved

    ! I love that she talked about acceptance for ALL people. Her outlook on faith and religion and the necessity of change was great and really resonated and inspired Grace to do what she felt was right - and take action.

    There was an instance of

    a character’s trans sibling that felt unnecessary. It seemed like a lazy slip and wasn’t needed.

    The gross blog of “

    ” was infuriating! It was filled with rape apologists and misogynistic language and made me want to punch someone in the face. The boys will be boys mentality and the sheer entitlement is enough to make anyone’s blood boil. Thankfully, this book is about challenging all of these beliefs and actions, but it’s hard to read about this and realize people like this actually exist.

    is such an important book that confronts and challenges rape culture and misogyny, while giving young girls the power of choice and agency. I loved the strong female friendships that develop and the bravery we see from so many characters. This was such a great book and I can’t wait to read more from Amy Reed.

    for rape and sexual assault

  • Kristy

    Grace and her family have just moved to a new town after her Baptist preacher mother has a spiritual experience and their small Kentucky town decides she is far too progressive for their community. Grace is shunned and the family basically flees for more open-minded pastures. Erin is a beautiful girl who loves science and

    . She also has Asperger's and a secret. Rosina is a lesbian struggling to be herself within the confines of her conservative Mexican family. She d

    Grace and her family have just moved to a new town after her Baptist preacher mother has a spiritual experience and their small Kentucky town decides she is far too progressive for their community. Grace is shunned and the family basically flees for more open-minded pastures. Erin is a beautiful girl who loves science and

    . She also has Asperger's and a secret. Rosina is a lesbian struggling to be herself within the confines of her conservative Mexican family. She dreams only of playing music and escaping her town, instead of taking care of her gaggle of cousins and working in her uncle's restaurant. Grace soon learns that the former occupant of her new house was Lucy Moynihan, who accused some popular boys of rape. Lucy wasn't believed, had a breakdown, and left town. While she's never been one to stand up for anything before, this angers Grace in a way she cannot fully describe. Erin and Rosina empathize with Lucy's situation, too. So the three find themselves an unlikely trio, and they do something even more unlikely: they form a secret group, made up entirely of girls, to protest the horrible culture at their school--a culture that condones things like rape and mistreatment of women. The group quickly takes off and the three girls realize that the group--and this cause--is far bigger than themselves.

    There's a definite trigger for sexual assault/rape, so do avoid this novel if that is an issue for you. This book can certainly be painful to read, but it's an amazing read and incredibly powerful, as well.

    The theme of boys and men getting away with horrible things in their towns seems so popular of late in books I've been reading. That could mean that

    is repetitive, but it's not at all. It's a wonderful additional to this topic, which is a discouraging one and quite representative of how things are in our current society.

    For me,

    I really loved the three main characters, especially Erin, and just felt for all three girls. This is the first book I've read by

    (but won't be the last), and I was so impressed by her writing. The girls pop off the pages. The novel is written from the perspective of Grace, Erin, and Rosina, as well as Lucy and "Us"--a section that depicts the state of things from various high school females. Reed gives us a fairly diverse cast, including Rosina, whose family are Mexican immigrants; a character with autism in Erin; and several LGBTQIA characters. And, of course, it's wonderful to have so many female perspectives represented. We also get a few glimpses of some of the boys via excerpts from a despicable blog, which is quite effective in its own right.

    As I said, so much of the strength of this book comes from its honesty. It doesn't shy away from the fact that the female teens are dealing with some very harsh realities in relation to sex, and it makes it clear how much they truly have to deal with. There are some extremely powerful moments in this novel (there's a chapter that occurs with some of the girls in a model home, and it's just wow. Amazing). It lays so much bare about what high school girls truly must go through. I found the brutal and realistic look at women and sex refreshing--albeit terrifying and heartbreaking. Rape, sexual assault, the power of sex, the way these women use sex to relate to each other and to boys--it's all there, and the result is heartbreaking, sad, powerful, and yes, sometimes hopeful.

    A few times, I wasn't sure if I always believed how the authority figures dealt with the girls and their group, but, truly, it's probably a realistic portrayal of small town America. The ending was also a little neat, but still worked in the context of this novel. I kept thinking how much I'd like my daughters to read this book when they're older, because there is so much here: so many talking points and truths and so many wonderful and strong women among all the sadness.

    In the end, this was a slow-moving book at times, but it was so well-written and a very powerful read. The characters are so strong, and you truly become part of their world as you read. I feel as if this is a must-read for female teens, and it's just so timely now in our culture, where the news brings more sexual assault talk each evening. There is something about this book that will leave you with hope, despite the horrors, and that's so important right now. Definitely a worthwhile read.

    I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss (thank you!) in return for an unbiased review; it is available everywhere as of 10/10/2017.

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  • Jessi ♡

    this book made me hate men more than i already do

  • may ➹

    It has SUCH an important and amazing message for women and men (and all in between) and it highlights just exactly why we need feminism in the world today. And it’s told in a beautiful, beautiful way with relatable characters.

    If you’re a feminist, read this. If you’re not a feminist (you should be), read this. If you’re neutral, read this. Just READ THIS BOOK because it is so so so important, especially in the world today.

    -

    It has SUCH an important and amazing message for women and men (and all in between) and it highlights just exactly why we need feminism in the world today. And it’s told in a beautiful, beautiful way with relatable characters.

    If you’re a feminist, read this. If you’re not a feminist (you should be), read this. If you’re neutral, read this. Just READ THIS BOOK because it is so so so important, especially in the world today.

    -

    Like, of course, a girl who’s raped by three guys definitely is trying to get attention, and not, idk, MAYBE TRYING TO REPORT THIS AWFUL SICKENING CRIME?????

    - But not only does it just portray so many horrible assumptions and behaviors towards rape, but it also talks about how even tho some rapists get punished, some get punished less because of the fact that they're white or rich or "don't look like a rapist".

    - And it ALSO talks about how, while a rapist may go to jail for their actions,

    , despite the fact that they're getting "justice". Their life is changed forever, and I think that that is just SUCH an important detail that people forget about rape, so I'm happy that this book included it.

    -

    -

    We get to read from the perspective of someone who actually like,, HATES girls and thinks them good for only “f*cking and making meals” (I WAS SO TRIGGERED) and while it’s vile and horrifying that

    , it’s definitely realistic??? People are saying that sexism doesn’t exist and neither does discrimination against women but ARE YOU BLIND.

    - This book is honestly so quotable that I wish I could share it all with you, but let’s just say that many many parts of this book made me want to actually literally HURT someone because

    . (Ie. a boy can have as much sex as he wants and doesn’t get called anything, but then a girl does it and she’s called slut and whore.)

    -

    This is the real deal. It tackles REAL topics and talks about REAL things that are happening right now in this world, believe it or not. It seems horrible, it seems unfair, it seems absolutely disgusting—but it is REAL and that is why this book is just

    .

    -

    - Okay, now that I’m done with just the message part of it:

    Grace is “fat”, Rosina is Mexican and lesbian, and Erin has Asperger’s. Like um,, yes?? Where is this diverse cast of main characters in other books????

    -

    -

    The characters grow SO MUCH throughout the whole book and it’s just beautiful to read about?? Grace becomes more confident in herself despite the size of her body, Rosina learns to embrace herself even tho it may not be the person her family wants her to be, and Erin slowly heals from her own

    and lets others in.

    -

    Um??? yes??? please??? I mean, there were a few slut-shaming comments thrown around (but it was totally called out), but the girls all bonded over their fight for rights and respect. They were all so supportive of each other and it was just beautiful.

    -

    You can’t imagine HOW EXCITED I was to find out that this was in third person. How often are contemporaries in third person??? There were also multiple POVs that were mostly the main characters’, but then there was also an “Us” chapter, and IT WAS WRITTEN SO LYRICALLY and beautifully?? I just loved it because we got to see into other girls’ perspectives. UGH. I love the writing style.

    -

    , but I think it just feels that way because this is SUCH a heavy topic and it’s just a deep, gritty book. Still, it was pretty hard to just really FOCUS on the book (especially when I got angry at stupid characters and the world). But like I said earlier, it definitely was engaging! Just hard to just, I don’t know, CONCENTRATE on it.

    - The ending is a… good ending. I don’t want to ruin it, and there's nothing wrong with it, but I just want to say that while it was a good ending,

    .

    -

    - We were

    ?? And this character was vital to the ending of the book??? If it weren’t for the fact that this was so focused on the characters’ growths and journeys, I feel like a lot of this book could’ve been cut, especially since it’s those last pages that are SUPER important.

    -

    It was said by the brother of a trans guy, and it wasn't called out on??? He said, "If I wanted to be a chick [...]" I think the point of this was to say that "if he wanted to be a girl", his parents wouldn't let him, meanwhile if a daughter wanted to be a male, that'd be accepted -- basically pointing out sexism. But it was really offensive imo because trans people don't "want" to be another gender? They ARE that gender.

    - There were so many characters that I just got confused sometimes???

    Bottom line:

    It is so so important and beautiful and it’s just something that everyone needs to read?? And even if you don’t like it (you probably will), its pretty cover will make you satisfied enough.

  • Jennifer Mathieu

    Y'all, this book blew my mind. I could not put it down. It is just so full of GIRL LOVE and FEMINIST POWER and I am HERE FOR IT. I especially loved Reed's 3rd person POV which doesn't always work for me in YA but here was pitch perfect. So many complex issues addressed with authenticity and heart. This is the sort of book that could change the life of a teenage girl who reads it. 5 plus stars. I adored it.

  • Amber Robertson

    M I N I   R E V I E W

    I tried to work out how to write this as a full-length review, however, I was stumped every time I went to start or tried to work out what I wanted to write; here I am doing a mini review which may become longer than anticipated.

    The Nowhere Girls was a book that I was scared to read. I really didn’t know what was going to happen throughout. However, I am left in tears. I have tears rolling down my face, as I realise how many girls aren’t believe

    M I N I   R E V I E W

    I tried to work out how to write this as a full-length review, however, I was stumped every time I went to start or tried to work out what I wanted to write; here I am doing a mini review which may become longer than anticipated.

    The Nowhere Girls was a book that I was scared to read. I really didn’t know what was going to happen throughout. However, I am left in tears. I have tears rolling down my face, as I realise how many girls aren’t believed when they come forward with their cases of sexual assault or rape. In the light of the #MeToo campaign that trended on Twitter recently, I think books like this are even more important. They’re eye-opening and conversation starters. They’re vital to this changing generation as we make our selves aware of what is right and wrong.

    This particular book follows a format of focusing on different people. For a large part, it focuses on Erin, Rosina, and Grace, three girls who become unlikely friends and founders of The Nowhere Girls. With Grace only new to the town and living in the home of a girl who was run out of town after (accurately) accusing three males of rape Grace is desperate to make a change. The three girls do this and they do it in a way that shakes the small town of Prescott.

    The other POV’s are ‘Us’ which follows many girls, switching between and sometimes not even naming them. It may be them during sexual encounters or just their thought process. I really found these chapters to be a powerful addition to this book. The remaining chapters that aren’t ‘us’ or the three main characters are random characters throughout the story. Some girls get their own chapter and some are some painfully gut-wrenching I just wanted to reach into the pages of the book and help them.

    The Nowhere Girls touches on so many important topics and includes so many important elements. There is an extremely diverse cast featured throughout well and it seems the author used own voices beta readers to make sure her representation was correct. I can’t speak on that personally, but the acknowledgements do acknowledge this.

    I was so completely involved in this book from the first chapter. I was made to feel repeatedly uncomfortable by the content and the graphic nature as we dive into the horrors of sexual assault and what means no. The way other girls treat each other is also highlighted in this book, as the group The Nowhere Girls tries to eliminate girl hate. It was refreshing to read a group of empowering young girls.

    Overall, this is one of the most powerful books of 2017 in my opinion and definitely an important book that touches on the rape culture of our world.

  • Miranda (MrsLeif's Two Fangs About It)

    was such an important and empowering book with brave female characters. THIS IS A BOOK THAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ!!! There were so many relevant and important topics in this book including; rape culture, the treatment of women, and feminism. THIS BOOK GAVE ME SUCH GIRL POWER VIBES AND I WAS LIVING FOR IT. GIRLS WERE SUPPORTING GIRLS AND THEY WERE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. The girls in this book created a movement to bring justice for women, and it was wonderful.

    T

    was such an important and empowering book with brave female characters. THIS IS A BOOK THAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ!!! There were so many relevant and important topics in this book including; rape culture, the treatment of women, and feminism. THIS BOOK GAVE ME SUCH GIRL POWER VIBES AND I WAS LIVING FOR IT. GIRLS WERE SUPPORTING GIRLS AND THEY WERE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. The girls in this book created a movement to bring justice for women, and it was wonderful.

    This book discusses rape quite a bit, so there are definitely trigger warnings for that.

    really showcased how rape is handled in this day and age. I have no personal experience with the topic but based on the stories I have heard, this book seemed to handle this aspect in a very real and honest way. This book touched on the common issue of the idea that when women are coming forward and saying they were raped, they are just using that as a cry for attention. THAT DRIVES ME CRAZY AND I WAS SO GLAD THAT THIS BOOK TOUCHED ON THAT SUBJECT. The book talked about privileged men getting away with rape and how THAT IS NOT OKAY! It also discussed how deeply rape effects the victim. This book really showed how the victim doesn't simply forget the incident and move on. It showed how this sticks with the victim for a very long time.

    I will say that there was one comment made in regards to a trans character in this book that made me a little uncomfortable. I felt like it was an unnecessary comment that could have been left out of the book. It was only one instant, but I still wish it wouldn't have been there. I also will say that this was a slow moving book. I was invested in the story the entire time, but it was a tad bit slower paced than I would have liked.

    The three main characters were all such unique and well-developed characters. Grace was such an understanding and kind person. She truly wanted the best for everyone and it warmed my heart to see how far she would go for people. Rosina was an extremely supportive, selfless, and strong girl. SHE LITERALLY SUPPORTED ALL THE GIRLS AND IT WAS SO ADORABLE. Erin was a strong, passionate, and dynamic character. I loved the development of her character and how she took down stereotypes for people who are on the spectrum. I don't have any personal experience with Asperger's, but I thought the author did a good job at representing it. Grace, Rosina, and Erin had such a supportive and powerful friendship. I loved how important their friendship was to the story.

    I also loved how diverse the characters were in this book. IT WAS SERIOUSLY WONDERFUL!

    was an important book that takes on rape culture and misogyny. This book showed the importance of supporting each other, giving women a choice, and for fighting for a better world.

    is a book I would recommend to EVERYONE.

    4 / 5 Fangs

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