Before the Devil Breaks You by Libba Bray

Before the Devil Breaks You

New York City.1927.Lights are bright.Jazz is king.Parties are wild.And the dead are coming...After battling a supernatural sleeping sickness that early claimed two of their own, the Diviners have had enough of lies. They're more determined than ever to uncover the mystery behind their extraordinary powers, even as they face off against an all-new terror. Out on Ward's Isla...

Title:Before the Devil Breaks You
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Before the Devil Breaks You Reviews

  • Mikee Andrea (ReadWithMikee)

    You all need to figure out what the heck you want to do with these covers and stick with it. Not that you guys needed to change them in the first place. -__-

    And they just keep getting worse and worse. The cover for The Diviners was phenomenal.

    BUT NOPE. YOU GUYS WANTED TO

    You all need to figure out what the heck you want to do with these covers and stick with it. Not that you guys needed to change them in the first place. -__-

    And they just keep getting worse and worse. The cover for The Diviners was phenomenal.

    BUT NOPE. YOU GUYS WANTED TO

    CHANGE THE COVER TO THIS:

    And now we're stuck with this:

  • Cameron Cassidy

    Libba officially announced today DIVINERS #3 is coming out spring 2017!!!! Commence the heavy breathing

    Edit-

    Fall 2017 NOOOOOOOOO!! Libba POR QUÉ! PORQUOI! PER CHE! ПОЧЕМУ! WARUM! يلهجضصرِ! WHY IN EVERY LANGUAGE!!

  • Trina (Between Chapters)

    abusive romance; attempted rape; human experimentation; racism and prejudices toward disability, mental illness, and same sex relationships that are a depiction of the time period. All of these things are quickly challenged and not glamorized.

    African American main characters. Jewish main character. Irish/Chinese American, disabled (walks with crutches), asexual main character with a f/f romance. Gay main character with a m/m romance. I believe one main character

    abusive romance; attempted rape; human experimentation; racism and prejudices toward disability, mental illness, and same sex relationships that are a depiction of the time period. All of these things are quickly challenged and not glamorized.

    African American main characters. Jewish main character. Irish/Chinese American, disabled (walks with crutches), asexual main character with a f/f romance. Gay main character with a m/m romance. I believe one main character is said to be half Cherokee. Prominent blind side character.

    I recommend this for fans of Ghostbusters, Stranger Things, and Scooby Doo. Or if you love amazing, supportive friend groups. And want lots of ships.

    This was an amazing installment in a series that has made its way into my all time favorites now. Definitely better than book 2 (even though I loved that one!) and we are seeing so many more things about the Diviners' pasts come to light. This book made me completely flip my opinion on a few of the characters. It broke my heart a couple of times. And then mended it. It was a full emotional ride.

    I can't speak to all the representation, but it's here and I've only heard good things from ownvoices reviewers so far. The only thing I really questioned was the frequent use of lines like "he went into a blind rage" or "they rushed in blindly" (not in reference to the blind character) - and I know some people are bothered by that type of language toward blindness. I can speak to the portrayal of the abusive romance, and I personally appreciated that the book doesn't dwell on it overlong while still showing the victim's mindset and reasons for having stayed very accurately (IMO).

    As for the audiobook - it's magic. I simply do not believe this was a single narrator, because January LaVoy carried scenes with 10 characters with such skill that you'd swear it was a full voice cast. The woman is incredibly talented. Definitely listen to this one if you can.

  • Chesca

    OMG IT HAS A RELEASE DATE AND A BLURB. OMGOMGOMGOMGOMGOMG. I LOVE ASYLUMS! I mean, I love stories that take place in such eerie atmospheres, not that I've been to one and found it enjoyable.

    But please tell me that the page count is wrong. 336 pages?? Are you kidding me?! I was expecting 800 pages!

  • Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    How am I supposed to move on from this?! My heart is broken 😭😭😭😭😭 will post more coherent thoughts when I get over my feels

  • Roshani Chokshi

    This series. Y'all. It's phenomenal. Beautiful, timely, intoxicatingly real and meticulously researched. Libba is a genius. Do not sleep on this series. Though when you start, I'm not sure you'll be able to find sleep anyway.

  • Emily May

    . I have been taking a little longer to read this than I usually would, but that is because I have been savouring it (hell knows when we'll get the next one!), wanting to linger as long as possible in the glitzy, jazz-filled horrors of this paranormal 1920s New Y

    . I have been taking a little longer to read this than I usually would, but that is because I have been savouring it (hell knows when we'll get the next one!), wanting to linger as long as possible in the glitzy, jazz-filled horrors of this paranormal 1920s New York City.

    In this instalment, the diverse gang of diviners are threatened by a supernatural creature known as the King of Crows. Ghosts haunt each of them - Evie, Memphis, Ling, Sam, Isaiah, Theta and Henry - both through their own personal monsters and the bigger demon they must all face. As the supernatural occurrences and the natural-world's government seem ever more entwined, it becomes clear that the Diviners's problems could be even bigger than first realised.

    Bray has, once again, got the atmosphere just right. I felt like I was in 1920s New York. I could feel the air on my face and hear the jazz music. I love how each scene was so carefully crafted. I was right there in the speakeasies with the characters and, so, when the monsters came, my heart was pounding too. I am thrilled to hear that there are more books planned for this series.

    However, this

    1920s America, and so there is more than ghosts to face. Both

    and

    included, in many ways, political aspects, but the current political climate lends even greater weight to the issues explored in this novel. As Bray powerfully states in the Author's Note:

    And she doesn't sugarcoat the horrors of the times. Racism, anti-semitism and the eugenics movement are part of everyday life for our characters. The book's cast includes characters who are black, mixed race (Chinese/Irish), Jewish, gay, a person with a physical disability, and others who are mentally ill. This latter allows the author to explore a particularly horrific aspect of the 1920s - the treatment of mentally ill patients in government institutions. Even several decades after the publication of Nellie Bly's

    (1887), progress was slow-going.

    . This is easily one of my favourite and most consistent YA series. It is somehow both a fun, easy read, and a darker, deeper look at humanity. It's interesting how fantasy can be used to reveal very real aspects of human nature.

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  • Emma Giordano

    AMAZING FANTASTIC WONDERFUL SPECTACULAR

    I seriously love

    series so much and

    was no exception. Libba Bray is genuinely one of the most talented young adults authors to ever exist. I'm blown away by her ability to masterfully create an ever-expanding, historically accurate, well developed world with complete, well-rounded interesting characters.

    I am DYING for book four.

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    In case any of you haven’t heard, I have spent my last few weeks dedicating my life to the audiobook narration of Libba Bray’s

    series. And uh, wow?

    I think what I like about this series is

    This is a story set in the freaking 1920s, a time that could easily be whitewashed dry of racism and discrimination. Easy to make unpolitical. But this story is so directly about the issues of the 1920

    In case any of you haven’t heard, I have spent my last few weeks dedicating my life to the audiobook narration of Libba Bray’s

    series. And uh, wow?

    I think what I like about this series is

    This is a story set in the freaking 1920s, a time that could easily be whitewashed dry of racism and discrimination. Easy to make unpolitical. But this story is so directly about the issues of the 1920s, the racism, the classism, the homophobia -

    It is

    .

    For example, did you know that from 1930-1960 in America,

    ? That several mental health institutes purposefuly fed their prisoners toberculosis-infected milk upon admission, killing 40% of their patients? That these same eugenics programs served as inspiration for the Holocaust? That they were performed almost entirely on nonwhite and mentally ill women? These facts may seem painful. They may also seem irrelevant to some. After all,

    aren’t in the 1960s. But Libba Bray emphasizes here that if we do not come to terms with our past, we are doomed to repeat it. So here’s one final question: did you know from 2006-2010 in California,

    ?

    History is not one faraway thing; it is a continuum, an endless repeating cycle. And it is something we may never escape.

    The villains of The Diviners are not the ghosts, scary as they are. The villains of this book are classism, eugenics, racism,

    This story gets its true staying power because it is so grounded in reality.

    I especially don’t want to scare people off this book who don’t like scary things, because though I think this series is freaking terrifying in places, you

    ignore those bits and enjoy nonetheless. But guys,

    I… uh. All I am going to say about this is that

    . I have never been less okay in my damn life than after reading that scene.

    Okay. So

    First of all,

    Listen, I know it had to happen, but this section feels a bit detached from the rest of the book - this really could’ve been two books - and worse, it is so goddamn

    . And possibly even worse, this section is incited by a scene in which sexual assault is… sort of used as a plot device to flip a complex situation? I knew exactly what occured in this scene going in, but I really disliked this - after the attempted assault occurs, it is never brought up again.

    And I also think Libba Bray has a penchant for the brilliant middle and then

    lackluster ending - or slightly disjointed final 25%, in this case - as she tries to throw together the setup for her next book. Not that she’s exactly alone on that issue, but I remember getting to the point of an hour left in my audiobook and thinking “what else is there?”

    I do think that listening to this book too fast was part of my issue - I binged the last 40% of this audiobook all at once after spending a week on the first half, and I think the transition just didn’t go as well as it should have. ADVICE: please slow down on the second half !!

    Second, there’s the fact that my two favorite leads, Ling and Henry, both got very lackluster storylines. After Henry’s fantastic story in book two, he’s relegated to the role of side character. And Ling actually has a storyline - well, a sexuality crisis that we all saw coming - but gets too little pagetime. All right, all right, Ling is my favorite character and I’m being biased. I’ll shut up now. (On a positive note, my other favorite, Theta, got the storyline of the fucking CENTURY— I’ll shut up now.)

    But overall, I don’t think that section could really ruin this book for me?

    Dark, horrifying, and fun. And

    I’ve already ranted about the themes, but I think the character work in this book was literally perfect. Evie’s character development within this book is my favorite she’s gotten so far; I never really loved her, but she’s become so good? wow? Mabel’s character development offers something very new for the book and series both. And Theta’s storyline is something

    special - this is the first book where she has really begun to recover from the trauma of her past. And you all know that I love Memphis and Theta, but I think I’ve actually officially dedicated my entire life to their love after this book.

    Listen, if you want even

    thoughts on this series, maybe try out my reviews of

    and

    . But

    And I'll leave you with a quote from the author's note:

    Bravo, Libba Bray.

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  • Mohammed Arabey

    المراجعة العربية ستكون للتعريف بالسلسلة ككل وليس الجزء الثالث فحسب

    المراجعة العربية ستكون للتعريف بالسلسلة ككل وليس الجزء الثالث فحسب


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