Killing Season by Faye Kellerman

Killing Season

New York Times bestselling author Faye Kellerman delivers an electrifying novel of suspense as a young man’s investigation into his sister’s death draws him into the path of a sadistic serial killer.He went searching for the truth. Now a killer has found him.The more you know, the more there is to fear…Four years ago, fifteen-year-old Ellen Vicksburg went missing in the qu...

Title:Killing Season
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Edition Language:English

Killing Season Reviews

  • Jennybeast

    Disclaimer: I am a huge fan of most of Faye Kellerman's work, so I'm surprised at this unfortunate review, but you seem to want an honest opinion, so. I sent this opinion to the publisher in hopes that significant changes occur before actual publication.

    This book is a slog -- I read it in digital format, so it's hard to tell how long it is, but boy could it use some editing. Slow paced, which I initially thought was for the purpose of Kellerman's usually fantastic character development, but the

    Disclaimer: I am a huge fan of most of Faye Kellerman's work, so I'm surprised at this unfortunate review, but you seem to want an honest opinion, so. I sent this opinion to the publisher in hopes that significant changes occur before actual publication.

    This book is a slog -- I read it in digital format, so it's hard to tell how long it is, but boy could it use some editing. Slow paced, which I initially thought was for the purpose of Kellerman's usually fantastic character development, but the characters in this book are just flat.

    Is it because they are teens? Is it because so much of the development is through dialogue? Not sure. However, the dialogue is also... lacking -- there are some clever moments, but then there are the painful attempts to add some teen lingo in -- and yes, I am using that word in the most awkward way possible so that you can get an idea of how dreadful the add-ins are. Killer dope! Ugh. I read YA lit and work with teens all the time. This dialogue is painful. The sex is even more so -- between the implied anal from our "smoking hot" cheerleader main character to the boy's fistfight that just got real because "she was cherry" and one boy had her first, this book has tipped into offensive and revolting, and I'm not talking about the serial killer. It's entirely possible that this is a realistic depiction of boys objectifying girls in our current culture. My problem with it is that these are the good guys, and that is appalling.

    Most of this book is set in the senior year of the main characters and if the point is to make the audience feel trapped in a pointless, drama filled exercise, then this book is a total success. If you are looking for the next fast-paced, hard to put down thriller, then I can't recommend it.

    Finally, having read through to the end, what is up with the extended fantasy of future romance between our overprotective main character and his new life-obsession? She's a young teen with a crush on a guy and a terrible attack in her life. Don't further disenfranchise her personality by making a prediction that her future holds neither surprises nor triumphs.

    What a bummer.

    Advanced reader's copy provided by edelweiss.

  • Diane

    I used to love both Kellermans writing, Faye the best. However this book was terrible. The main character was unbelievable. I have teenagers, one of which has worked with police through the school system. I know how it works, even with obsessions.

    This must have been a first draft mistakenly sent to be published. Words left out, poor spelling, and details not matching all lead to my theory.

    Maybe this was a way for her to try to bring in a younger audience? I don't know. I definitely prefer Pete

    I used to love both Kellermans writing, Faye the best. However this book was terrible. The main character was unbelievable. I have teenagers, one of which has worked with police through the school system. I know how it works, even with obsessions.

    This must have been a first draft mistakenly sent to be published. Words left out, poor spelling, and details not matching all lead to my theory.

    Maybe this was a way for her to try to bring in a younger audience? I don't know. I definitely prefer Pete and Rina to this.

  • Karen Wegman

    I really enjoy Faye Kellerman's books but not this one. Way too long. I thought she repeated over and over again. I found it quite tiresome. Just didn't work for me.

  • M

    Killing Season

    Years ago, as an early fan of Jonathon Kellerman, I decided to give his wife, Faye, a try. I reasoned that a good author would be attracted to another good author. In the case of Ms. Kellerman, this was not the case. I abandoned the book — whatever it was — early. But yesterday in the library, I saw she had a new book out and thought I’d try again, this time thinking she may have grown as a writer.

    I’m sad to report she hasn’t. This book is a mess: the writing (and editing) are poor

    Killing Season

    Years ago, as an early fan of Jonathon Kellerman, I decided to give his wife, Faye, a try. I reasoned that a good author would be attracted to another good author. In the case of Ms. Kellerman, this was not the case. I abandoned the book — whatever it was — early. But yesterday in the library, I saw she had a new book out and thought I’d try again, this time thinking she may have grown as a writer.

    I’m sad to report she hasn’t. This book is a mess: the writing (and editing) are poor, the plot is lame, the characters wooden and preposterous, the dialogue from another universe. “Killing Season” is a mystery about the murders of four teenage girls, murders that occur in four different cities in four different seasons. The first victim is the sister of the book’s hero, Ben Vicksburg, who is, we are told, a genius, which makes him the ideal amateur detective for this tale. Presumably the book is about him solving the case, or at least that’s one of the things it’s about, but I wouldn’t know; I quit halfway through. Keep that in mind as you read this; maybe the book makes a complete turnaround. I wouldn’t know.

    I won’t go into all my complaints about “Killing Season.” Three points should suffice. First, I don’t know if Ms. Kellerman ever really knew what book she wanted to write. Is it a coming of age story about two teenagers who meet under trying circumstances and have to work out how to have a relationship? Is it a whodunit? Is it a police procedural? I’m not sure, but it fails on all three plots. These teenagers are like no teenagers I have EVER met: their conversations are unrealistic, their attraction to one another or anyone else is never quite explained, and the dynamics of the larger high school group haven’t existed since 1950. There’s tension in the relationship that hasn’t much basis; the sex, given the odd puritanism of the group, is just weird; and the extent to which each of them tolerates undesired behavior is ridiculous. And how is it that 17-year-olds are getting on airplanes, flying 1000 miles, renting cars, staying in motels, all without any parental involvement or even parental knowledge? Last I heard you have to be 25 to rent a car, you need serious money to buy a plane ticket, and the parents of a murdered girl might not be all that eager/willing to talk to the brother of another girl, even if he is a genius.

    And don’t get me started on the parents. To a person, the three sets of parents I met in this book are disengaged from their children despite serious catastrophes in their families. On the one hand, they are described as caring, loving, good parents; on the other hand, they ricochet through bad behavior: abandoning the kids at meals, failing to engage in serious dialogue, invading privacy, and getting angry when they should be getting worried. They are, as the King of Siam would say, a puzzlement.

    But I think the icing on the cake is the police. We have detectives who show this 17 year old boy the complete files on his sister’s murder, have conversations with him in which they are stunned by HIS insight into the case. They alternate between telling him to quit investigating and then pleading for his notes. And as an aside: we have magic. Vicks, the boy, tells us he collects data, puts it into his computer, and waits for the analysis; yup, magic happens. And the magic reveals pretty basic stuff, like the meaningfulness of the dates of the disappearances of the girls.

    Okay, one more point. These kids are repeatedly told by important people in their lives to stop doing stuff: don’t go on that hike, turn over the files, stop asking questions, do this, don’t do that. And they are NEVER obeyed, and nothing ever happens to convey to these kids that they should be paying attention. No one gets grounded, has the car keys taken, loses phone privileges, nada. What universe do these people occupy?

    I'm curious; it's clear Kellerman has devoted readers. And it's clear I'm not one of them. So just who does she write for? I ask that in all seriousness. I'm going to read the other reviews so I have a better understanding of what others see.

  • Jeanne

    Ugh! Awful! The teen dialog was almost unreadable and very unrealistic! Did they publish the unedited 1st draft by mistake?

  • Grace

    Too much like a young adult novel for my taste...

  • Kiki Belle

    This is not a mystery. This is not a thriller. I'm a decent way into the story and so far it's just petty high school drama with some dark edge lurking behind it.

  • Chloe

    The Killing Season. May I give it more stars?

    I have enjoyed Faye Kellerman's novels since her very first. As all series do - they became formulaic and I think she may have thought this too. She left behind her Decker books and went to a place she knows well. New Mexico. And in this setting between Santa Fe and Albuquerque she created one of the most polished and beautifully written novel/thrillers in her career. It was big - over six hundred pages and it was dense and it was her best - one of t

    The Killing Season. May I give it more stars?

    I have enjoyed Faye Kellerman's novels since her very first. As all series do - they became formulaic and I think she may have thought this too. She left behind her Decker books and went to a place she knows well. New Mexico. And in this setting between Santa Fe and Albuquerque she created one of the most polished and beautifully written novel/thrillers in her career. It was big - over six hundred pages and it was dense and it was her best - one of the best I have read in years. The plot never lost hold of the story or its people. The characters were visible and alive and the conclusion was held closely until nearly the end. Crossing genres of thrillers, mystery, cross cultural families and terror she created a book I shall remember for a long time. She did not so much as raise any bar - she created her own and jumped high - very high. The Kellermans write. So far two of their children have joined them and they have had their ups and downs (The Golems were marvellous) but as they mature and/or collaborate it becomes evident that together or separately this family has much more to say and I look forward, especially to Faye Kellerman, saying much more.

  • Donna

    I found this book in the mystery section of the library with thriller written across the front. Since I like Faye Kellerman's Decker/Lazarus series, I thought I'd found a winner in this standalone book. I had no idea this was actually full of teenage dialogue. If I'd known then what I know now, I wouldn't have checked it out because I'm simply too old to find teen drama interesting. I bet young people would like it though. The editor/publisher should have marketed this book correctly.

  • Skip

    Truthfully, I am surprised at all of the negative reviews for this book. It is not as good as her long-standing series featuring Rina Lazarus & Peter Decker. Instead, this book is about teenagers and, in particular, Ben Vicksburg, whose 16-year old sister was raped, murdered, and buried when he was much younger. He has sworn an oath to make the killer pay for his deed. With this as his singular focus, he has abandoned his friends, and spends most of his time researching other cases. He's a t

    Truthfully, I am surprised at all of the negative reviews for this book. It is not as good as her long-standing series featuring Rina Lazarus & Peter Decker. Instead, this book is about teenagers and, in particular, Ben Vicksburg, whose 16-year old sister was raped, murdered, and buried when he was much younger. He has sworn an oath to make the killer pay for his deed. With this as his singular focus, he has abandoned his friends, and spends most of his time researching other cases. He's a total nerd, but makes several major breakthroughs, as the local police make no progress: yes, I know this is unrealistic, but that's why it's called fiction. Eventually, Ben draws the attention of the killer and the prettiest girl in the high school. The book reminded me of Barry Lyga's Jasper Dent trilogy. Rated R.


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