Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani

Pashmina

Pashmina tells the story of an Indian-American girl who struggles to fit in at high school, then discovers more about her family's history with the help of her mother's magical pashmina....

Title:Pashmina
Author:
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Edition Language:English

Pashmina Reviews

  • Julie

    This was beautiful drawn and the coloring was brilliant. I also loved how it didn't shy away from using Indian terms and short hand, not taking the time to explain or simplify it for white audiences. As well as being a fascinating, feminist story about women's choice, I learned a lot and I cannot wait to shove this at everyone.

  • Tara

    Priyanka is an American teenager who is curious about her Indian ancestry and wants to visit India to find out more about her mother's past and meet some of her family. She finds a magical pashmina in her closet that gives her glimpses of the India she has always imagined. I liked how the illustrations change from grayscale in her real life to vivid colors in the fantasy scenes. The story and the illustrations were wonderfully done! [I received an ARC via NetGalley.]

  • Jeimy

    Priyanka discovers a magical Pashmina that allows her to see things others can't. When a letter from her aunt arrives from India, she is convinced that is where her destiny lies. This book takes us along as Priyanka is forced both to mature and to come to terms with her culture and heritage. A must for middle-school students who enjoy graphic novels.

  • Jen

    Meh. Got this for a cousin who is a reluctant reader because this is in comic book form, which she enjoys. The artwork was good, but the story didn't really resonate with me. I was pissed with the mom not telling her daughter sooner about the father. Like, it wasn't a huge deal, but she was making it out like it was some tragic secret. It could have been used as a good learning experience for the daughter, instead of hidden.

    I hope my cousin likes it. We'll see. Three, I wasn't moved, but it's m

    Meh. Got this for a cousin who is a reluctant reader because this is in comic book form, which she enjoys. The artwork was good, but the story didn't really resonate with me. I was pissed with the mom not telling her daughter sooner about the father. Like, it wasn't a huge deal, but she was making it out like it was some tragic secret. It could have been used as a good learning experience for the daughter, instead of hidden.

    I hope my cousin likes it. We'll see. Three, I wasn't moved, but it's me, not the book, stars.

  • Marianne (Boricuan Bookworms)

    Loved the art, loved the storyline, loved the honest depictions of India, loved Priyanka. A short and sweet graphic novel that more people should read.

  • Rachel Mans Mckenny

    This graphic novel is incredibly lovely. Chanani illustrates one teen girl's search for identity and family, with a touch of magic. The main character is a second-generation Indian-American daughter of a single mother. Her mother has been quiet about her own past, and so when a blessed Pashmina gives the girl visions of India, she strives to discover more about her heritage and where her mother came from.

    The illustrations are stunning. When in "real life", Chanani uses black and white panels, wh

    This graphic novel is incredibly lovely. Chanani illustrates one teen girl's search for identity and family, with a touch of magic. The main character is a second-generation Indian-American daughter of a single mother. Her mother has been quiet about her own past, and so when a blessed Pashmina gives the girl visions of India, she strives to discover more about her heritage and where her mother came from.

    The illustrations are stunning. When in "real life", Chanani uses black and white panels, while magic is portrayed in brilliant color and the past is shades of sepia. For such a brief volume, it tells a powerful and uplifting story about cultural and familial understanding. Highly recommended to teens and tweens.

    Thank you to NetGalley for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.

  • Christy

    I had the chance to see Nidhi speak at SDCC and have been anxiously awaiting Pashmina's release since! I absolutely loved this sweet story and recommend it to anyone looking to learn a little more about Indian culture.

    Pashmina is the story of Priyanka, an Indian-American girl who is like most teens - troubling to communicate with her mother and trying to figure out who she is. She's curious about India and her father. Whenever she asks about them, her mom changes the subject. Nidhi uses facial e

    I had the chance to see Nidhi speak at SDCC and have been anxiously awaiting Pashmina's release since! I absolutely loved this sweet story and recommend it to anyone looking to learn a little more about Indian culture.

    Pashmina is the story of Priyanka, an Indian-American girl who is like most teens - troubling to communicate with her mother and trying to figure out who she is. She's curious about India and her father. Whenever she asks about them, her mom changes the subject. Nidhi uses facial expressions from panel to panel to show that there's more going on than Pri and the reader know.

    Before we can blink, Pri finds herself transported to the colorful land of India, brought on by a mysterious pashmina that was tucked away. The use of color versus the monotone of the contemporary world will transport readers into this universe. The pashmina opens up not only a world but a door to the answers she has been seeking.

    I enjoyed the flow and length of Pashmina. I loved the glossary of terms at the end and also Nidhi's use of Indian terms within the text. It's short and sweet and to the point, making it an enjoyable read for all ages!

  • Erica

    Priyanka is learning to drive, likes to create comics, has a cool best friend, has a mean blonde enemy, and lives with her mother in California. Her life is fairly standard until two things happen: 1) her beloved uncle and aunt are going to have a baby and she won't see them as often so she 2) asks Shakti to please get rid of the baby because they don't need it, they have her, and then she finds a magical pashmina that transports her to romantic India, making her want to find out about her herit

    Priyanka is learning to drive, likes to create comics, has a cool best friend, has a mean blonde enemy, and lives with her mother in California. Her life is fairly standard until two things happen: 1) her beloved uncle and aunt are going to have a baby and she won't see them as often so she 2) asks Shakti to please get rid of the baby because they don't need it, they have her, and then she finds a magical pashmina that transports her to romantic India, making her want to find out about her heritage.

    That sounds like more than 2 things but, really, it's just 2.

    Priyanka learns and grows and understands that she can be proud of being an Indian American and that she doesn't have to sacrifice who she is to be accepted but that she should be more accepting of others, herself.

    It's a nice story and I liked it.

  • First Second Books

    Pashmina is heartfelt young adult graphic novel about an Indian-American teen's attempt to reconnect with her mother’s homeland through a magical pashmina shawl. Follow Pri as she realizes that the India of her imagination is not like the real india, and as she learns the truth to he magical pashmina's origin.

  • Lola  Reviewer

    A graphic novel with an Indian American teenager who wants to know more about her country, family and culture? The day I say no to diverse stories will never, ever come.

    Priyanka lives in the US with her mom who left India when she was her age. Priyanka knows little about India, and when her mom does tell her about the life girls live there and how they have less choices than in the US, Priyanka thinks she’s exaggerating.

    Ms. Chanani created a realistic teenage heroine other teenagers will under

    A graphic novel with an Indian American teenager who wants to know more about her country, family and culture? The day I say no to diverse stories will never, ever come.

    Priyanka lives in the US with her mom who left India when she was her age. Priyanka knows little about India, and when her mom does tell her about the life girls live there and how they have less choices than in the US, Priyanka thinks she’s exaggerating.

    Ms. Chanani created a realistic teenage heroine other teenagers will understand well and hopefully be able to connect with. I enjoyed reading about her adventures and think her character development deserves recognition. Definitely.

    But I must say Priyanka’s worst weakness is that she keeps most of her feelings inside. Like the time her teacher asked her to enter her comic in a competition, she immediately declined because she doubted herself, but she never really explained her refusal. Or when she was sad about her uncle having a baby. I understood she was scared they would spend less time together, and she wouldn’t have a father figure anymore, but she never talked about her feelings to anyone or even to herself.

    I came out to that conclusion because I’ve read many YA stories before, and I’ve began to read people well… Plus I myself have no father, so there’s no way I would have missed that. But the author needed to make it clearer. And how the hell did no one notice Priyanka’s sadness at the mention of the baby? They’re supposed to be her family. It’s really unrealistic no one stopped to look at her miserable expression and ask what is wrong.

    The best parts were when the setting switched from US to India and we started to visually experience it. The illustrations are very pretty. I can totally imagine this becoming an animated film or TV series for kids. It should have been longer I believe, so we could see more of India. It’s the story that makes me want more though, so it succeeded in making me curious about life in India, which was one of the author’s goals I’m sure. Nicely done. Quite an original concept too.

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