Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani

Pashmina

Priyanka Das has so many unanswered questions: Why did her mother abandon her home in India years ago? What was it like there? And most importantly, who is her father, and why did her mom leave him behind? But Pri's mom avoids these questions--the topic of India is permanently closed.For Pri, her mother's homeland can only exist in her imagination. That is, until she find...

Title:Pashmina
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Pashmina Reviews

  • Julie

    This was beautiful drawn and the coloring was brilliant. I also loved how it didn't shy away from using Indian terms and short hand, not taking the time to explain or simplify it for white audiences. As well as being a fascinating, feminist story about women's choice, I learned a lot and I cannot wait to shove this at everyone.

  • Jeimy

    Priyanka discovers a magical Pashmina that allows her to see things others can't. When a letter from her aunt arrives from India, she is convinced that is where her destiny lies. This book takes us along as Priyanka is forced both to mature and to come to terms with her culture and heritage. A must for middle-school students who enjoy graphic novels.

  • Rashika (is tired)

    I've been waiting for 

    since I first heard it existed so when my friend got a copy, I dove into hers while I was visiting and also ended up coming home to a precious copy of my own (#SHOUTOUT.) I've already read it twice and there is a very huge possibility I'll have read it a third time before the end of the year (and even the end of the month, tbh.) SO. I THINK it's safe to say that I love 

    .

    It's already being marketed as such but I also just think 

    is perfect for fans o

    I've been waiting for 

    since I first heard it existed so when my friend got a copy, I dove into hers while I was visiting and also ended up coming home to a precious copy of my own (#SHOUTOUT.) I've already read it twice and there is a very huge possibility I'll have read it a third time before the end of the year (and even the end of the month, tbh.) SO. I THINK it's safe to say that I love 

    .

    It's already being marketed as such but I also just think 

    is perfect for fans of American Born Chinese. The books share so many wonderful qualities and parallels but 

     is still its own story and so so SO heartfelt at that. I mean, it even has Gene Luen Yang's stamp of approval.

    follows the story of Priyanka Das as she learns more about the place her mother immigrated from. Priyanka's mom has cut off all contact with her family in India and doesn't ever talk about the circumstances that her brought her to the United States. When she discovers a hidden pashmina in a suitcase, she discovers an India she has never gotten to know.

    Through Priyanka's story, Chanani explores the complex relationships between immigrant parents and their children. It is an ode to the diaspora experienced when you are dislocated from the 'motherland' but ultimately, its an exploration of how cultures transcend artificial boundaries.

    The panels in this graphic novel are also stunning. While I don't have the right vocabulary to really describe the art-work, it is beautifully done and I love the carefully planned use of colors to accentuate certain scenes throughout the novel. The artwork really brings Priyanka's journey to life in a way words really couldn't.

    If this book wasn't on your radar, I really hope you will choose to add it to your enormous tbr's because this graphic novel is so wonderful, and so heartfelt and I just have a lot of emotions. I am so grateful to Nidhi Chanani for gracing us with this wonderful piece of literature and I cannot wait to talk even more about it to ANYONE WHO WILL FUCKING LISTEN.

  • Erica

    Priyanka is learning to drive, likes to create comics, has a cool best friend, has a mean blonde enemy, and lives with her mother in California. Her life is fairly standard until two things happen: 1) her beloved uncle and aunt are going to have a baby and she won't see them as often so she 2) asks Shakti to please get rid of the baby because they don't need it, they have her, and then she finds a magical pashmina that transports her to romantic India, making her want to find out about her herit

    Priyanka is learning to drive, likes to create comics, has a cool best friend, has a mean blonde enemy, and lives with her mother in California. Her life is fairly standard until two things happen: 1) her beloved uncle and aunt are going to have a baby and she won't see them as often so she 2) asks Shakti to please get rid of the baby because they don't need it, they have her, and then she finds a magical pashmina that transports her to romantic India, making her want to find out about her heritage.

    That sounds like more than 2 things but, really, it's just 2.

    Priyanka learns and grows and understands that she can be proud of being an Indian American and that she doesn't have to sacrifice who she is to be accepted but that she should be more accepting of others, herself.

    It's a nice story and I liked it.

  • First Second Books

    Pashmina is heartfelt young adult graphic novel about an Indian-American teen's attempt to reconnect with her mother’s homeland through a magical pashmina shawl. Follow Pri as she realizes that the India of her imagination is not like the real india, and as she learns the truth to he magical pashmina's origin.

  • Lola  Reviewer

    A graphic novel with an Indian American teenager who wants to know more about her country, family and culture? The day I say no to diverse stories will never, ever come.

    Priyanka lives in the US with her mom who left India when she was her age. Priyanka knows little about India, and when her mom does tell her about the life girls live there and how they have less choices than in the US, Priyanka thinks she’s exaggerating.

    Ms. Chanani created a realistic teenage heroine other teenagers will under

    A graphic novel with an Indian American teenager who wants to know more about her country, family and culture? The day I say no to diverse stories will never, ever come.

    Priyanka lives in the US with her mom who left India when she was her age. Priyanka knows little about India, and when her mom does tell her about the life girls live there and how they have less choices than in the US, Priyanka thinks she’s exaggerating.

    Ms. Chanani created a realistic teenage heroine other teenagers will understand well and hopefully be able to connect with. I enjoyed reading about her adventures and think her character development deserves recognition. Definitely.

    But I must say Priyanka’s worst weakness is that she keeps most of her feelings inside. Like the time her teacher asked her to enter her comic in a competition, she immediately declined because she doubted herself, but she never really explained her refusal. Or when she was sad about her uncle having a baby. I understood she was scared they would spend less time together, and she wouldn’t have a father figure anymore, but she never talked about her feelings to anyone or even to herself.

    I came out to that conclusion because I’ve read many YA stories before, and I’ve began to read people well… Plus I myself have no father, so there’s no way I would have missed that. But the author needed to make it clearer. And how the hell did no one notice Priyanka’s sadness at the mention of the baby? They’re supposed to be her family. It’s really unrealistic no one stopped to look at her miserable expression and ask what is wrong.

    The best parts were when the setting switched from US to India and we started to visually experience it. The illustrations are very pretty. I can totally imagine this becoming an animated film or TV series for kids. It should have been longer I believe, so we could see more of India. It’s the story that makes me want more though, so it succeeded in making me curious about life in India, which was one of the author’s goals I’m sure. Nicely done. Quite an original concept too.

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  • Sepideh Salarvand

    هم نمره دادن بهش سخته و هم ازش نوشتن. کتاب کمیک استریپه و در مورد دختر نوجوان هندیالاصلی که در آمریکا به دنیا اومده و بزرگ شده و حالا انگار دچار بحران هویته. از هند فقط سمبوسه و خوراکیها رو میشناسه و حتا از پدرش چیزی نمیدونه.

    تا یک جایی از داستان من حتا داشتم فکر میکردم کاش ترجمهش کنیم اما از یه جایی به بعد احساس کردم زیادی در ستایش رویای آمریکاییه. فازِ آمریکا سرزمین آزادیه و هند سرزمین بدبختی توش پررنگ بود هر چند سعی میکرد یه جاهایی با جملاتی جلوی این فاز رو بگیره.

    شاید دو و نیم نمرهی مناسبتری ب

    هم نمره دادن بهش سخته و هم ازش نوشتن.‌ کتاب کمیک استریپه و در مورد دختر نوجوان هندی‌الاصلی که در آمریکا به دنیا اومده و بزرگ شده و حالا انگار دچار بحران هویته. از هند فقط سمبوسه و خوراکی‌ها رو می‌شناسه و حتا از پدرش چیزی نمی‌دونه.

    تا یک جایی از داستان من حتا داشتم فکر می‌کردم کاش ترجمه‌ش کنیم اما از یه جایی به بعد احساس کردم زیادی در ستایش رویای آمریکاییه. فازِ آمریکا سرزمین آزادیه و هند سرزمین بدبختی توش پررنگ بود هر چند سعی می‌کرد یه جاهایی با جملاتی جلوی این فاز رو بگیره.

    شاید دو و نیم نمره‌ی مناسب‌تری باشه

  • Eve

    This was a beautifully illustrated middle grade graphic novel! I loved learning about Indian culture, new words in Hindi, and the magical realism. That being said, I felt like the actual story was a bit weak and disjointed. Wasn't a waste of time, but felt like the plot could have been better executed, as well as the characters.

  • Elyse

    Author Nidhi Chanani, was born in India, and raised in Southern California. This

    gorgeously Illustrated graphic novel had to be - must have been - somewhat inspired by her own memories ( at least at one point in her developmental growing years), a search for her own cultural identity.

    Her artwork is so stunning ( first black and white - then moves into incredible colorful colors) - that I actually just flipped through this lovely 5 by 7 size silky paper book looking at the drawings - before settl

    Author Nidhi Chanani, was born in India, and raised in Southern California. This

    gorgeously Illustrated graphic novel had to be - must have been - somewhat inspired by her own memories ( at least at one point in her developmental growing years), a search for her own cultural identity.

    Her artwork is so stunning ( first black and white - then moves into incredible colorful colors) - that I actually just flipped through this lovely 5 by 7 size silky paper book looking at the drawings - before settling in and reading the entire story.

    At the start of this story Pashmina, in High School, is behind the car driving with her mother sitting right next to her. Mom is not the least bit relax....saying things like,

    “In India they don’t allow girls to drive”.... and I didn’t learn until I was 20, two years after coming to this country”.

    Mom is a little stifling and definitely overprotective. Pri’s mother has never told her why she left India and came to United States. She wants to know what India’s like and she also wants to know who her father is who her mother left in India.

    After Pri finds a mysterious chest that contains a magical scarf - and after winning prize money for a cartoon contest that she had entered, she buys a plane ticket and leaves for India.... and that’s when the illustrations get very colorful.

    I guess I ‘can’ understand that Pri didn’t see the United States - Los Angeles- to be anywhere near colorful as India. —lol —and who knows who was President at the time.

    Shame on me - I could resist!

    Pri is a feisty ‘modern girl’.....ha, seems I mentioned being a modern girl myself in a review just a few days ago.

    Pri also has a great imagination.

    Great graphic- moving - insightful - fantastical- and FUNNY!

    Age range is targeted 10-14....but shhhhhh most adults will adore “Pashmina”, too!

  • rachel • typed truths

    Trigger warnings for bullying, sexism and illness/hospitals.

    This was a sweet contemporary graphic novel about an Indian-American teen wanting to learn more about her heritage. I thought the cartoonish art style worked really well to convey the coming-of-age themes and make it appeal to both middle grade and older readers. There was some great commentary on identity and self-discovery but, ultimately, it failed to really delve into these topics.

    My biggest problem was the weak plotline. Chanani’

    Trigger warnings for bullying, sexism and illness/hospitals.

    This was a sweet contemporary graphic novel about an Indian-American teen wanting to learn more about her heritage. I thought the cartoonish art style worked really well to convey the coming-of-age themes and make it appeal to both middle grade and older readers. There was some great commentary on identity and self-discovery but, ultimately, it failed to really delve into these topics.

    My biggest problem was the weak plotline. Chanani’s attempt to touch upon several different issues - from bullying to family to feminism - could have worked if the story had more narrative. A dialogue and art-focused medium did not allow these plot threads to be explored to their greatest potential, only briefly touching on each one and then moving on. This split up the story into awkward little sections and it felt incredibly disjointed. The bullying was never really addressed, for one, but I also found the comic competition rushed and underdeveloped. I wanted more from Priyanka’s relationship with her uncle and how that was resolved. The magical realism element also did not work in my opinion. While I thought the colouring in those sections were gorgeous, it was confusing. I have no idea how Priyanka remained so calm in those scenes - or really what they were all about. The explanation for it was overwhelming, a tad too infodumpish.

    Characterwise, I did think Priyanka was a well-written protagonist. While I could not relate to her on a personal level, I know that her story is definitely going to resonate with a lot of readers. The family focus was also wonderful. I loved that the story really delved into being the child of an immigrant.

    I think that this is going to be an important story for a lot of readers but it was too short and rushed for my personal taste. In my opinion, the story would have worked better in a written format with illustrations. Priyanka was definitely a sweet protagonist but I wanted more from her.

    : Indian-American protagonist, #ownvoices representation, and primarily Indian cast.

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