Lock & Mori by Heather W. Petty

Lock & Mori

In modern-day London, two brilliant high school students—one Sherlock Holmes and a Miss James “Mori” Moriarty—meet. A murder will bring them together. The truth very well might drive them apart.Before they were mortal enemies, they were much more…FACT: Someone has been murdered in London’s Regent’s Park. The police have no leads.FACT: Miss James “Mori” Moriarty and Sherloc...

Title:Lock & Mori
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Lock & Mori Reviews

  • Katie

    First, I feel like I need to say that I had extremely high expectations for this book. I'm a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, from the original novels to different film and TV adaptations. I was so drawn to the idea of a female Moriarty - what an amazing concept, right? Well, I'm here to tell you that this book delivered! The pacing is lightning fast, the mystery is exciting, and oh my goshhhhhh Sherlock is wonderful.

    When discussing a retelling of a beloved story, I think it's most important to address

    First, I feel like I need to say that I had extremely high expectations for this book. I'm a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, from the original novels to different film and TV adaptations. I was so drawn to the idea of a female Moriarty - what an amazing concept, right? Well, I'm here to tell you that this book delivered! The pacing is lightning fast, the mystery is exciting, and oh my goshhhhhh Sherlock is wonderful.

    When discussing a retelling of a beloved story, I think it's most important to address characterization. Mori was awesome! She's not particularly likeable in that she's kind of detached emotionally, especially at the beginning and she's really not nice at all. However, she was an incredibly compelling MC and definitely sympathetic. She was exactly what I wanted: the beginnings of what could be a master villain.

    There are also small appearances by Watson and Mycroft that I hope will be bigger in future books.

    But who really stole the show for me was Sherlock. Heather portrayed him more on the socially awkward side than a grumpy, brilliant hermit (like he is in the original), which I really liked. He has a strong sense of vulnerability about him, despite his intellect, which was just so endearing. I wanted to hug him every time he said something. Seriously. Can I keep him?

    I also think it's important to note that while this is a mystery and the plot line is good, readers who don't normally read in the mystery genre (like me) shouldn't be intimidated to read this. The characters still move the story along more than the mystery, and they're definitely a special cast of characters you want to get to know.

    There have been a lot of Sherlock retellings, even in YA, but I think this one definitely breaks onto the scene and proves that Heather Petty is an author to watch. Tight writing, compelling characters, and a heartbreaking story make this an amazing debut!

  • Katherine

    Le sigh; time to play sad trombones in the background. This was an extremely underwhelming book, considering how it was marketed. I mean,

    I already got a taste of how badass this could have been from

    I guess I was expecting equal badassery this time around. Instead, all I got was

    Le sigh; time to play sad trombones in the background. This was an extremely underwhelming book, considering how it was marketed. I mean,

    I already got a taste of how badass this could have been from

    I guess I was expecting equal badassery this time around. Instead, all I got was

    James “Mori” Moriarty is living with her abusive father and three little brothers in London, trying to scrape by and survive. Ever since their mother died from cancer, their living situation has gotten worse. It’s not like she can go to the police; her father IS the police. Not to mention there’s that dastardly business with the dead bodies in Regency Park. All this changes when Mori meets Sherlock Holmes. Brilliant, calculating and frightfully intelligent, his skills of deduction and perception are unparalleled. Together, they make the best crime fighting team. Apart, they are bound to destroy themselves. The game is afoot, the world is watching, and secrets will be revealed.

    First of all, this book is marketed as a mystery with a dash of romance. Someone in the marketing department must have been distracted the day they were writing the description, because that same description doesn’t match what’s inside the book. Here’s a more accurate plot description:

    Don’t get me wrong; I love me some making out and sexy times in books. But

    I think it hindered the mystery of the aspect story so much that the mystery itself seemed very underwhelming.

    I admired her ability to manipulate people so easily, but at the same time I felt the author made those lies too convenient for the people around her to fall for. Her knack for getting people to do what she wanted, escaping sticky situations, and ferocious desire to protect her brothers made you root for her. However, there are times where I wanted to shout at her to “JUST TELL THE DAMN TRUTH” so she could escape her miserable situation. I think the author has the potential to develop Mori even further, make her even more manipulative and devious (if it’s going where I think it’s going).

    And of course, there’s Holmes. And boy was I disappointed.

    This is where this version of Sherlock Holmes fails. What was so wonderful about the original was how extraordinary unique he was. The antisocial, slightly insane man who plays the violin, shoots at walls and is seemingly incapable of any human emotion. Whose deduction skills are legendary and could tell you what you had for breakfast, lunch, and dinner on a particular day. With this Sherlock, we get a teenage boy who plays the violin and is considered semi-weird by his schoolmates, but other than that, there is almost little to no resemblance to his literary counterpart. In fact, one would say that he was surprisingly normal.

    I liked the fact that this Sherlock had emotions and actually cared about people, but he would never had put any romantic counterpart in the way of solving the mystery. The mystery would be too important to him. And even more alarming, his deduction skills were surprisingly inefficient and lacking. Yeah, I get it, he’s a teenager and he’ll grow, but I think I was expecting a bit more in regards to his intelligence and deduction skills.

    Towards the end, the writing and the plot picked up A LOT, and there was just enough interest for me to be curious about picking up book two. This quote was the deciding factor, because there are so many avenues this statement could mean.

    Is this implying that Mori will eventually become the later adult Sherlock Holmes’ nemesis, but gender-bent? Will her mindset of revenge be her eventual downfall? This could be deliciously good, if done right.

    For an even better Sherlock retelling, try reading

    by Ellie Marney. The chemistry between the two MC’s is electric, the mystery gripping, and this version of Sherlock Holmes is a lot more like the original.

  • Sophie

    I've read a few different Sherlock retellings recently, and even though I've had this book since January, I've kept putting it off for some reason. Now, I don't know whether to be happy or sad I waited so long to read this amazing book. It's quite a small book, but packed full of plot, and I read it in just a few hours, and now think that the wait for Mind Games might kill me.

    The other Sherlock retellings I've read, A Study in Charlotte and the Every series, have had Holmes and Watson, in whatev

    I've read a few different Sherlock retellings recently, and even though I've had this book since January, I've kept putting it off for some reason. Now, I don't know whether to be happy or sad I waited so long to read this amazing book. It's quite a small book, but packed full of plot, and I read it in just a few hours, and now think that the wait for Mind Games might kill me.

    The other Sherlock retellings I've read, A Study in Charlotte and the Every series, have had Holmes and Watson, in whatever form, as the main characters. Lock & Mori, as you can probably guess, used the Holmes and Moriarty characters, instead, though they weren't enemies. James 'Mori' Moriarty is the only daughter of police DS James Moriarty, and is taking care of her three younger brothers since the death of their mother. Since losing his wife, DS Moriarty has been a vicious wreak, and Mori knows how to read the signs on when best to avoid her father. After a few chance encounters with the reclusive Sherlock Holmes, Mori becomes involved in a sort of 'game', investigating a recent string of murders in Regent Park. As they delve further into the deaths, they find that the truth may be closer than they think.

    Firstly, I loved that this book was still set in London, with both Lock & Mori living 6 doors apart on Baker Street, Sherlock at 221, obviously. The geography of London, and the transport system, were used really well in the book, and though I've only been to London 4 times, I could picture the main sites in my head.

    Secondly, the characterisations of Lock & Mori seemed perfect. Both characters were a thrill to read, and even though we only got Mori's PoV, you could kind of see Lock's feelings and thoughts throughout the book. I think that if there had been dual PoVs, it wouldn't have been such a good read. Because Mori is more tied to everything, the reading experience of seeing her discover everything for herself makes the reader feel as though we are Mori, and we care for her more. I couldn't have asked for a better protagonist, and can't wait to see her growth throughout the series.

    The romance that there is, is angsty and shippy at the same time. Neither of them have much experience with other people, especially Lock, who's more of a loner, and seeing them trying to read each other's social cues, body language, etc., was amazing. Because of how hard hitting the book is at times, especially towards the end, the romance does go through a distinct rocky patch, that I can see continuing into Mind Games.

    Since finishing the book, I've read the synopsis for Mind Games, and am even more desperate to get my hands on that book, though I know that it'll likely take all my emotions, and mess them up. This may be my favourite Sherlock adaptation I've read!

  • Natalie (Never trust a duck)

    Do my eyes deceive me? Lock and Mori? I may just keel over from pure anticipation. Benedict Cumberbatch, you've officially been YAed.

  • Gian

    UPDATE REACTION 11.02.14

    I'm a big Sherlock Holmes fan from books, TV show Sherlock with Benedict Cumberbatch and the film with Robert Downey Jr. I cannot wait what this book is going to be with a female Moriarty. What trouble (in a good way as well) does this character brings!

    I guess Sherlock, Male Moriarty and I will have tea until this book comes out

  • Cait (Paper Fury)

    One of these days I'll find a Sherlock retelling that pleases me. But guess what? IT IS NOT THIS DAY.

    And the mystery wasn't even exciting. AND the deducing was like a

    omg how dare they. I felt like it was 10% detective skills, 10% random kissing, and 80% family drama.

    • Mori is so very

    She's a math genius (whoo) and she speaks like she fell out of an 19th century period drama

    One of these days I'll find a Sherlock retelling that pleases me. But guess what? IT IS NOT THIS DAY.

    And the mystery wasn't even exciting. AND the deducing was like a

    omg how dare they. I felt like it was 10% detective skills, 10% random kissing, and 80% family drama.

    • Mori is so very

    She's a math genius (whoo) and she speaks like she fell out of an 19th century period drama (whooo) and she has secrets (whooooooo) BUT WHERE IS THE ACTUAL CUNNING SCHEMING SLIGHTLY PSYCHOTIC MORIARTYNESS??? BECAUSE I DON'T SEE IT AND I AM THE DISAPPOINT. Also her name is still James because apparently no one here knows how to gender-bend names.

    • Plus what was with the lingo???

    No contractions. Posh long sentences. Phrases like "we are an unstoppable force, you and I" (this is not an exact quote because stupid me didn't save the page no. and now I can't find it DANGIT...so paraphrased pretentiousness). IT WAS JUST SO UNREALISTIC AND AWKWARD AND ANNOYING. Everyone felt distant and stiff and SO not like real teenagers. Every time they mentioned a phone or ipad I kind of got a shock because I thought we were all trotting about in top hats and bustles.

    • Plus it was written by an American...which, I mean, IT'S PROBABLY MEAN OF ME TO EVEN

    ...

    It just felt inauthentic and awkward.

    Watson is mentioned, like,

    . Mycroft does nothing except be around to babysit and strut about. Mrs. Hudson is an off-handed-comment Mori has a truckload of brothers. I just...what is with all these characters if they are going to be as interesting as small sad pancakes?

    Hello, my name is skeptic to this whole thing.

    It just felt random. Dead people in the park. Whooo. Don't care. (And then later on it's all linked up to their personal lives and SO CONVIENIENT and ARGH.)

    I'm so glad the police leave valuable and important files around conveniently so the teenagers can get at them.

    • Also! Don't forget! Starring: THE BUMBLING USELESS POLICE.

    • Why does Sherlock have

    of any other version of Sherlock ever? Oh wait. He plays the violin. He

    be Sherlock.

    • So obviously I was waiting the whole time for Sherlock and Mori to have some sort of CATASTROPHE that drives them to be enemies.

    Because it was more like a

    She's full of herself and illogical.

    He's just a kid who looks at crime scenes and gets about 3% of the solving done because Mori is doing it all.

    • WHO'S CRYING WITH DISAPPOINTMENT? I'M NOT CRYING. YOU ARE.

    • (I just really

    like Sherlock Holmes okay?! And I wanted this to do it justice.)

    • Plus they were

    Instalove? I think yes.

    Look...I'm just super picky about my Sherlock retellings. I've only ever been impressed by

    (which just afdjsakld does such a good job GO READ IT). I want genius and mysteries and complex mind games. I GOT NONE OF THAT HERE. I think there is emotion in the book, in the case of Mori struggling against an abusive father, and that seemed quite well portrayed. But everything else was just...

    . Which is like normal "meh" but it's super so it wears a cape.

    Okay, goodbye now. I need to rewatch Bendywine Cumberbundle yelling at something and strutting about in his Sherlock hat and coat.

  • Aimee (Aimee, Always)

    Don't hate me, but I'm going to share a secret with you all:

    . Yes, I've never watched any show/movie about him, nor read any piece of literature related to him. Phew, now that I finally got that off my chest, we can talk about

    .

    This book was not what I was expecting--in a bad way, unfortunately. And I think the aspect that contributed most to my disappointment was the writing.

    Don't hate me, but I'm going to share a secret with you all:

    . Yes, I've never watched any show/movie about him, nor read any piece of literature related to him. Phew, now that I finally got that off my chest, we can talk about

    .

    This book was not what I was expecting--in a bad way, unfortunately. And I think the aspect that contributed most to my disappointment was the writing.

    . In a quick contemporary it might work, sure, but in what's supposed to be a spine-chilling mystery? Err.

    . Again, I don't know if this is really how Sherlock acts, but there was this John-Green-character vibe (there's no other way to describe it, really) that just doesn't work. Also, he's moody as heck. And take note: if we're really thinking about it, Lock isn't really even the main character of this book. Mori is.

    . I don't really have anything against her character, but she just lacked a strong personality, something I was looking forward to and was expecting from this book.

    This book could've done

    the romance as well, since, in Math, negative plus negative equals negative. Hence

    . I couldn't feel anything for their tandem at all--except maybe annoyance and frustration.

    The actual plot of the book was completely underwhelming, and mostly unbelievable.

    , and

    just adds to the pile of disappointments.

    Overall, this isn't a book I'd recommend to you if you're looking for something exciting and heart-pounding.

    i's way too inconsistent and boring for my taste. I can't even write a detailed review because of how underwhelming it was.

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  • Bonnie

    I love Sherlock. I love anything to do with Sherlock. But this? I wanted to rip my hair out. The frustration was insane between the characterization, the absurd plot, the even more ridiculous ‘mystery’, but the insta-love thing Lock & Mori had going on was beyond foolish. All lumped together, it was positively rage inducing for me. But I’ll try to break it down and explain myself instead of just summing up my review with this gif:

    : A recent string of mysterious murders catches the

    I love Sherlock. I love anything to do with Sherlock. But this? I wanted to rip my hair out. The frustration was insane between the characterization, the absurd plot, the even more ridiculous ‘mystery’, but the insta-love thing Lock & Mori had going on was beyond foolish. All lumped together, it was positively rage inducing for me. But I’ll try to break it down and explain myself instead of just summing up my review with this gif:

    : A recent string of mysterious murders catches the attention of ‘Lock’ and subsequently Mori when he enlists her help in investigating. All murders occurred in the same spot and the murder weapon appears to be, strangely enough, a sword.

    : Mori is the oldest of four children who lives with her alcoholic father and her three younger brothers. Her mother recently passed leaving her father a changed man, taking out his grief on his children. Sherlock Holmes? We’re told next to nothing about. He has a brother, and a sick mother and… yep. Basically, this was all Mori’s story, told from her point of view and Sherlock, unfortunately, ended up being nothing more than a supporting character. It would have been completely fine if Mori was a character I wanted an entire story about, and I didn’t.

    : The two inevitably fall into a hasty romance where they seemingly spend approximately half the story kissing and Sherlock is continuously making awkward declarations of love.

    In addition, Mori is a constant angst-ball complaining about having to suffer through life’s tribulations all by herself and telling herself that she can’t tell Sherlock about herself because *gasp* he can’t know about her so she’s trying to solve this mystery by herself. Of course, all along Sherlock is practically a leech in human form and he sleeps on her bedroom floor at night to make sure she’s safe. Yeah. So alone. Poor thing.

    But the one thing that bothered me so completely that it dwarfed all previously mentioned issues: the logic of the decision making. Sure, it could be argued that “this is fiction! logic isn’t a requirement!” Well, this is what I have to say to that:

    Most of what I’d like to say is just a giant spoiler so I’ll try to be as vague as possible. You know those types of mysteries that have the characters doing the most ridiculous things (like trying to solve murders on their own) instead of being smart and just going to the police? This is one of those stories. You know those stories where the character has friends there for them and instead of allowing them to be of some help they choose to go off on their own and handle it themselves (predictably getting themselves in a world of shit in the process)? This is one of those stories. All these silly, stupid decisions could have all been avoided with a little common sense. Common sense isn’t quite so common apparently, at least when it comes to Mori.

    The ending sets up even more future angst and unnecessary drama to come. Considering we know how Sherlock and Moriarty’s relationship typically ends up transpiring, I guess the groundwork had to be laid somehow. However the series progresses though, I won’t be around to witness. Sherlock and Moriarty both are two of the smartest individuals in fiction and in my opinion that shouldn’t change if you switch up their gender and turn their relationship into a love affair. I guess I now need to change my “I love anything to do with Sherlock” to “I love practically anything to do with Sherlock” because I definitely did not love this one.

  • Khanh (the meanie)

    There was no point to this book. You can call it an homage to Arthur Conan Doyle. I just call it

    . It was lacking in originality and unbelievable when it tried to be witty. The only reason I can see for the insertion of the Sherlock name is to sell the book based on familiarity.

    Even with willing suspension of disbelief, the plot of this book far overreaches the realms of credibility. There's no allusion to the famous series, I don't believe the

    series existed in this

    There was no point to this book. You can call it an homage to Arthur Conan Doyle. I just call it

    . It was lacking in originality and unbelievable when it tried to be witty. The only reason I can see for the insertion of the Sherlock name is to sell the book based on familiarity.

    Even with willing suspension of disbelief, the plot of this book far overreaches the realms of credibility. There's no allusion to the famous series, I don't believe the

    series existed in this version of modern-day England, because there's not a single joke about a boy named Sherlock Holmes and a girl named James "Mori" Moriarty. The characters are obviously Sherlock Holmes and his nemesis, James Moriarty...except in this book, they're more like reluctant friends, sometime-rivals, and blushing lovers. Cute. Not.

    Sherlock Holmes is an anti-social, ill-adjusted, mad genius of a high school boy.

    Who, like his namesake, deduces things.

    His foil is the brilliant Mori. Oddly named for a girl, if it's not politically incorrect of me to say so.

    She's got a troubled family life with a drunkard Detective of a dad who calls her a whore, compares her to her late beloved sainted mother, and beats up her little brothers.

    All of a sudden, there's a body in the park, and the two of them just randomly bumps into each other in the park in the middle of the night [insert shocked face here]. The policemen of London are clearly bumbling fucking idiots who can barely put one feet in front of the other, so obviously it's up to the two brilliant teenaged sleuths to solve the crime.

    Yep. So off goes the amateur detectives to solve a Deep Dark Mystery/Conspiracy. In-between their snogging sessions, that is.

    Oh, and the synopsis?

  • Jen Ryland

    Okay, if I'd read the synopsis (or read more Sherlock Holmes growing up) I might have been prepared for what happens in this book. Most (all?) Sherlock re-imaginings I've read, from TV shows like

    or

    to books like

    focus on the Holmes-Watson relationship, the wonderful bromance (sometimes a romance) between the quirky, brilliant Holmes and the under appreciated, long-suffering Watson.

    I was fascinated that this book focuses primarily on Holmes and Moriarty (a criminal m

    Okay, if I'd read the synopsis (or read more Sherlock Holmes growing up) I might have been prepared for what happens in this book. Most (all?) Sherlock re-imaginings I've read, from TV shows like

    or

    to books like

    focus on the Holmes-Watson relationship, the wonderful bromance (sometimes a romance) between the quirky, brilliant Holmes and the under appreciated, long-suffering Watson.

    I was fascinated that this book focuses primarily on Holmes and Moriarty (a criminal mastermind and Holmes' mortal enemy). In fact, this book is told from Moriarty's (or technically, a girl nicknamed Mori's) point of view and Holmes is the love interest and sidekick. Most of the book is about setting up what makes Mori tick: a crappy homelife and abusive father (while I abhor domestic violence, I found this aspect of the story a bit heavy-handed), a secret involving Mori's mother, and a death that Mori feels responsible for. Clearly, this girl is headed to the dark side in future installments.

    While this is interesting in theory and I do love a good headed-to-the-darkside-plot, I began to realize that, going forward, this is going to present a huge problem where the romance is concerned. In this installment, we see Holmes fall in love with Mori -- so shippable. But by the end, that ship seems headed for the rocks. Either this series will become an epic love-to-hate-to-love story, or we will get to see Holmes' complete heartbreak. I'm voting for #1.

    If you're a diehard romantic, you might want to tread carefully. But I'm really intrigued as to where this is headed...

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