The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind

Told in Kvothe's own voice, this is the tale of the magically gifted young man who grows to be the most notorious wizard his world has ever seen. The intimate narrative of his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, his years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-ridden city, his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a legendary school of magic, and his life as...

Title:The Name of the Wind
Author:
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Edition Language:English

The Name of the Wind Reviews

  • Patrick

    I kinda liked this book. But my opinion on the matter probably shouldn't be trusted....

  • Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    This is why I love fantasy so much. After a recent string of okay fantasy novels, a couple of good ones but nothing to get really excited about, I've rediscovered my passion thanks to this book. I'm so impressed, and so in love, I can't begin to describe it. But I can try to give you a feel for the book, if I can figure out where to start and how to do justice to this masterpiece.

    Kvothe (pronounced like "Quothe") is a world-renowned figure of mystery with a disreputable reputation - a hero or a

    This is why I love fantasy so much. After a recent string of okay fantasy novels, a couple of good ones but nothing to get really excited about, I've rediscovered my passion thanks to this book. I'm so impressed, and so in love, I can't begin to describe it. But I can try to give you a feel for the book, if I can figure out where to start and how to do justice to this masterpiece.

    Kvothe (pronounced like "Quothe") is a world-renowned figure of mystery with a disreputable reputation - a hero or a demon depending on which stories you hear. The real man has hidden himself away at an inn in the middle of nowhere with his apprentice Bast - we know not why - and it's not until the Chronicler discovers him there that he shows any interest in reliving his past life. Insisting that his story will take three days to tell, and that the famous chronicler must write it down exactly as he tells it, he begins to share his story: a child genius growing up with his parents' troupe, performing plays and tricks across the land while being taught "sympathy" (magic), history, chemistry etc. by a tinker, Abenthy, who had been to the University; to ending up homeless and penniless on the streets of Treban, a big port city. It's not until he's fifteen that he makes it to the University, and is accepted, though he's three years younger than is usual. Abenthy has taught him well, and combined with his impressive memory, natural talent, quick intelligence and training, he moves quickly up the ranks of the university.

    There are many adventures and mishaps along the way, and while some plotlines come to a tidy end at the close of this novel, over-arching plotlines and themes have been given a solid foundation to continue on into the next books. It took a surprisingly long time for me to realise the connection between the number of days he will take to tell his story, and that this is "Day One" in the trilogy - it's told over the course of the first day. The only thing is, he's young yet (Chronicler judges him to be about 25, though at times he looks infintely older), and there are things happening in "real time" that intrude upon the story, that will need to be resolved I think - so while I have every confidence Rothfuss has excellent control over his creation, I would love more than three books :)

    I can't think of the last time I was this impressed by any story, let alone a fantasy novel. I won't compare it to bloody George R.R. Martin like everyone else is doing because I don't see that they have anything in common, really - one is a work of pure genius and the other is utter crap. Comparing them only heightens my dislike of

    . In truth, it's simply a marketing strategy to compare new books to ones that are already really popular, in order to draw in a well-established audience.

    This

    an epic fantasy - epic in scope - but it's also a

    , a story of a person's life, a life journey (including the quiet moments), which I love. The character development is ludicrously good. The world-building is solid, believable and original - there're enough new elements to keep your interest, but not so many that you get confused and overwhelmed: a perfect balance. The design of "sympathy" is original and unique, and makes so much sense that I'm half-surprised it doesn't really work. It's complicated enough to not be trite, but one basic premise is the connection between things, the sympathy they have with each other - if you broke a branch in two, the two halves would still have a connection, like sharing the exact same DNA, and so if you control one half you affect the other half. Same with two pennies of the same metal, so that, if you were holding one and someone holding the other and they worked a "binding" on their half, and, say, lifted it in the air, then your penny would also lift. It's fabulous! It's an intellectual kind of magic, not a "wave the wand" type. It takes knowledge, concentration and effort, so in effect, anyone could learn.

    As for the characters and their growth, I am so impressed and so in love I will no doubt do a bad job of expressing it. While Kvothe's story is told in his voice, first person, the present day interludes are told in third person omniscient, but usually from certain characters' points of view. You get a mix of other people's impressions of characters, and a gentle showing that tells us even more. The genius is in how Kvothe is portrayed: while telling the story, himself as a young boy, already having experienced tragedy and sorrow and despair, and already feeling the weight of worldly concerns, but still with a lot to learn, comes across strongly. This is counter-balanced with Kvothe as a man, having been through all that and more and had it shape him into something subtly different, yet still very much the same person. If it had been written poorly, there would have been discord between the two Kvothes, but there isn't. He has so much charisma, and is such a complex sort, that I really felt for him. I may even have a bit of crush, actually. He's not good or evil, but he's suffering from a conscience: he's very human, and lonely, despite the friendship of Bast. At the same time, he's a god-like figure, an amazing musician, a skilled fighter, and a powerful magician. One moment he's commanding and chillingly masterful, the next he's doing Bast's bidding and fetching food and cutting wood for others. I expect it's his contradictions and complexities that draw me to him.

    The writing style is smooth, the pacing just right (though the first few chapters take a while to get you into the story, you still need to read them closely because there're a lot of details in them), and the prose isn't cluttered with boring, irrelevant descriptions or pointless details. It's a fat book and a long story, but it flies by. While it needed better proofreading - there were a lot of problems with dialogue punctuation; there were a few lazy typos; he never once used a semicolon when he should have; and he always used "lay" instead of "laid" (but hey, at least he was consistent) - the prose itself is engaging, often humorous, detailed but not overly so, and never boring. I also loved the little songs and ditties that are included, and the stories within Kvothe's story.

    Likewise, the way he doles out the various plots, revealing and hinting at the right moments, building up tension and anticipation, giving clues that start to coalesce into a stunning picture, is, frankly, impressive. The supporting cast, while not as fully explored as Kvothe (it is his story, after all), are in their own ways vividly portrayed and gradually explored. There's no chunky exposition or a description of a character shoved at you all at once. It's more a show-not-tell kind of book, appreciating the intellect of its audience and our ability to figure things out for ourselves. Nicely done. There was a while there, when I was reading, that the prose gave me the same kind of thrill as reading a sex scene in a romance novel might - but it could have just been the excitment of the story.

    One last thing (though I could go on forever): I loved what he did with dragons. I won't spoil it by saying more, just that it's original and delightful - this coming from someone who's been known to get a mite bored by dragons in fantasy.

    I would easily recommend this to anyone who enjoys fantasy, but also to people who enjoy great stories told wonderfully well. As many non-fantasy readers loved Harry Potter, they would also love this book.

  • Danica

    Okay. Wow. Let's back the hell up here. How is this so highly rated? Are those genre-establishment reviewers who're thrashing about in paroxysms of fawning five-star NEXT BIG THING OMG joy wearing blinders or just so used to mediocre fantasy that this book actually comes across looking good in comparison? Why do these high fantasy disappointments keep on keeping on? Whose brilliant idea was it to throw around the GRRM and Harry Potter comparisons, thereby actually getting me to waste my pennies

    Okay. Wow. Let's back the hell up here. How is this so highly rated? Are those genre-establishment reviewers who're thrashing about in paroxysms of fawning five-star NEXT BIG THING OMG joy wearing blinders or just so used to mediocre fantasy that this book actually comes across looking good in comparison? Why do these high fantasy disappointments keep on keeping on? Whose brilliant idea was it to throw around the GRRM and Harry Potter comparisons, thereby actually getting me to waste my pennies on this book when the money could've been better spent, I dunno, on some new dish sponges or perhaps bundled together into a lump sum donation to the Feminist Fantasy Writer Foundation? And for God's sake, why do male fantasy writers always write about do-everything, know-it-all male heroes who vanquish dragons, defeat their conniving rivals, strangle angels, and literally walk through fires /carrying weeping females over their shoulders like sacks of potatoes/???? HE WALKS THROUGH A FIRE GUYS. WITH A GIRL SLUNG OVER HIS SHOULDERS. LIKE JESUS CHRIST OR SOMETHING. AKJGALGJLSJLAG W.T.F.

    For one, the protagonist is an insufferable little shit. He's the best musician, the best dueler, the best test-taker, the fastest learner, the snarkiest snarker, and the best actor. Plus he's got the greenest eyes too. And an encyclopedic knowledge of everything there is to know, ever. And a tragic past. His one handicap is that he's dirt poor, but hey! That's okay, because he's so awesome it hardly matters. (Well, to be hair, it is a fairly severe handicap. But that doesn't make up for his infuriating lack of weakness in basically every other area of his life.) To echo an earlier review, I really was waiting for someone to hip-check this guy into a mud bog. Or a moat full of voracious alligators. Yay, the end!

    To be sure, Rothfuss is very self-conscious about his story-making. I lost count of the number of times he wrote, "If this were a story, Kvothe would be serenading Denna on his magical lute with a red rose clenched between his teeth. But it's not, which is why he's blushing and stammering (but still, amazingly, Getting the Girl)".

    And the language. Okay. What. I understand this is fantasy, so it's gotta have the ponderous, stentorian, "And Twas it Was that Haldorian Son of Keoth-Arbalith Returned to the Great Stone Tower of Gothalas to embrace his weeping elven bride" Tolkien vibe, and that Rothfuss was a substitute high school teacher all his life and didn't graduate from the much-touted Iowa workshop with an awesome literary degree of MFA awesomeness, but jesus, put a cap on it, please? Like, the cheapass cliff-hangers that end one chapter only to resolve in the very next paragraph? And this following paragraph, which I especially earmarked out of boggle-eyed feelings of what-the-fuckery?

    "Deoch, my heart is made of stronger stuff than glass. When she strikes she'll find it strong as iron-bound brass, or gold and adamant together mixed. Don't think I am unaware, some startled deer to stand transfixed by hunter's horns. It's she who should take care, for when she strikes, my heart will make a sound to beautiful and bright that it can't help but bring her back to me in winged flight."

    A moment of wondering silence for how this drivel actually managed to avoid excision via enraged editor.

    Not to go on an embittered, long-winded rant or anything (.. too late for that), but this book represents pretty much everything I hate about high fantasy. There's the utter paucity of strong female characters. The cardboard villainy of the baddies. The lack of real dimension besides character 'typeness'. The never-ending leveling up of powers. The protagonist who can do no wrong. The frankly boring, and sometimes hair-raisingly clichéd, use of language. Also, the lack of females. You know what this book makes me want to do? Smash the patriarchy. Oh my god. I think this guy needs to sit at the feet of Joss Whedon or George R.R. Martin and learn something worthwhile.

  • Ian

    I'm sorry, Mr. Rothfuss. For realz, actual sorry. Honestly. I tried giving your book two stars out of pity, since I so wanted to like it and I'd feel bad about giving it one star and dragging down your average rating. Though you don't appear to need my pity. Your book has the highest average GR rating (4.49) of any of the book I've read. I finally dropped my rating down to one star because it's just a steaming pile of crap and I couldn't take the embarrassment of having posted a two-star rating

    I'm sorry, Mr. Rothfuss. For realz, actual sorry. Honestly. I tried giving your book two stars out of pity, since I so wanted to like it and I'd feel bad about giving it one star and dragging down your average rating. Though you don't appear to need my pity. Your book has the highest average GR rating (4.49) of any of the book I've read. I finally dropped my rating down to one star because it's just a steaming pile of crap and I couldn't take the embarrassment of having posted a two-star rating on something so awful.

    Mr. Rothfuss, you probably don't give a shit about my rating since, judging from your GR biography, you appear to be very comfortable in your own academic, geeky skin. And that is totally cool. I'm an academic, geeky type myself. Not as geeky as you. You are

    geeky. Like I said: that's cool. Anywayz, for a long time I gave you two stars since a couple of my most favorite people (my brother and his fiancé) both love your book. One star for each of them. But, like I hinted, the book is pretty bad. So are you and me good? No hard feelings? Awesome. I don't take shit too personally, either. So now I'll get down to ripping your book, knowing we can still be friends.

    In the interest of full disclosure, I faithfully admit that this book goes in my DNF shelf. I made it 162 pages in (I was reading it on the Kindle app on my iPhone and made it to § 3154, but with little arithmetic I determined that was the equivalent of page 162 in the mass market paperback). I just couldn't finish it. I gave it a good honest try and eventually found myself reading only so I wouldn't have to admit to my brother that I didn't like it enough to finish. But that isn't a good reason to spend my time—something we have precious little of in our short lives—reading something I dislike and not getting paid for it. So I'm sorry, bro. I tried. (Yes, my brother is one of my GR friends and will likely see this review.) Now on to the reasons I couldn't finish the book.

    Most of

    is written in the first person; it's the autobiography of Kvothe, who has a number of things in common with "The Most Interesting Man in the World." Kvothe is reciting his life story to a scribe while his male companion, Bast, looks on.

    There are several interesting facts pertaining to Kvothe and Bast. First, Bast is described as "sharp and delicate, almost beautiful, with striking blue eyes." Second, Kvothe and Bast run a bed-and-breakfast. Third, Bast follows Kvothe around like a puppy dog. Fourth, Bast likes to tuck Kvothe into bed and watch him sleep. Fifth, Bast cries like a little girl when he hears something sad. Finally, Bast apparently can manifest himself as some sort of goat-man creature. Do you see where I'm going with this? Kvothe runs a bed-and-breakfast, in which a very sensitive and beautiful man follows him around and occasionally turns into a goat. Bed-and-breakfast and goat-men: what could be sexier? Not that there's anything wrong with that. I believe everyone should have the freedom be who they were born to be and I have several close friends who happen to be gay; I'm the last person who would have a problem with Kvothe and his beautiful male companion getting frisky (goat-style, of course). I only mention the implied homoerotic connection because Kvothe (a.k.a. The Most Interesting Man in the World) is supposed to be a lady-killer. No, not a psycho rapist murderer, you freaks. A lady-

    . A Lover of Women. I suppose that's not necessarily inconsistent; perhaps Kvothe swings both ways. Let's all say it together, now:

    Not all of the book, however, is written in the first-person. First-person narrative is reserved for Kvothe's recitation of his life story. The remainder of the book, particularly the scenes of Kvothe manhandling his lover in front of the scribe (Bast said Kvothe leaves bruises), are written in the third-person. I'll address my displeasure with the third-person sections first.

    Let me clarify at the outset that I have no problem with the writer switching between first-person and third-person narrative. I recognize it can be a powerful tool and it serves the structure of this story quite well. The book begins in the third-person, then as Kvothe tells his life story it switches to first-person, then back to third-person for occasional interludes. My problem is with the author switching his narrative voice within the third-person sections. The academic geek is all over the place in that regard. Sometimes he writes a scene in third-person subjective, other times third-person objective. Some passages read like third-person limited, others third-person omniscient. At points the author seemed to switch voice page to page, or even paragraph to paragraph. In one especially irritating scene he even threw in a hint of first-person for a paragraph or so. Maybe if I'd kept reading I would have found a scene or two in second-person, just for good measure. The switching of narrative voices was confusing and frustrating.

    Perhaps the author saw his story as being so epic and/or complex that a third-person omniscient narrator was called for throughout. I certainly understand the advantages of an omniscient narrator that can relate some scenes from one character's point of view and others from a second character's point of view, and so on. But that theory doesn't fit

    . With most of the book, indeed the real meat of the story, being written in the first-person, the third-person sections are a minority and seem almost incidental, merely setting the stage and creating some dynamic/juxtaposition. And the theory doesn't explain why some scenes are told from the points of view of everyone present (a voice that strikes me as pompous and unreal) while other scenes are described objectively, from nobody's point of view. Still other scenes alternate points of view paragraph by paragraph, or even sentence by sentence, and at a couple of points I wasn't entirely sure who's thoughts I was reading. Such constant switching without an obvious purpose or pattern made the omniscient narrator (if that's what was intended) seem unreliable.

    Now on to the bulk of the book: Kvothe's first-person account of his life story. Kvothe's account actually read much smoother than the third-person interludes. Without the worry of mixing up his voices, the author did a much better job on the first-person narrative. Indeed, Kvothe's story incorporates some fair (not horrible, not great) drama, suspense, and sentiment. Portions are even quite quotable. The Author was thoughtful and observant in his telling of Kvothe's story, relating events and thoughts with which I could identify and pointing out a few things I wouldn’t have thought of. Unfortunately, for the reasons set forth below, those good qualities were not sufficient to demand my continued attention.

    Many passages in Kvothe's story felt lazy, unnecessary, unintended, or unoriginal. A few things were just plain weird. For example:

    --> Kvothe asks his father a question and the father makes a big deal about wanting to answer with a poem, but after five lines he forgets the rest. Setting aside that the five remembered lines were some

    poetry, why is the rest forgotten? If the poem was important, then the author should have taken the time (or sought the help) to craft something decent for the father to recite. If the poem was not important, why have the father recite a poem at all? A pointless poem only serves to clutter the prose.

    --> As a boy Kvothe watched his parents make out so he could learn kissing technique. That's weird.

    --> Speaking of Kvothe watching his parents, he has some sort of Oedipal affection for his mother. It shows in a few places but never more so than when he describes his mother as "slender, fresh, and bright, pale and smooth-skinned in the firelight." I have trouble reconciling the Oedipus Complex with "The Most Interesting Man in the World." Unless I just misunderstand one or the other?

    What I find especially interesting is my suspicion that the author was not consciously creating the Oedipal attraction. Similarly I suspect the author was not consciously creating the romantic connection between Kvothe and Bast. Maybe if I'd finished the book I would have found out that Kvothe was a gay man who masturbated to the memory of his mother. But I doubt it.

    --> Kvothe declares that he will "sum up" a certain magical principle and begins with his "first" point. He then expounds upon that first point, but never reaches a second point, nor a third or fourth. The explanation merely peters out.

    --> Kvothe's father sets up a dichotomy between poetry and music that I don't believe exists. (I admit that's only a disagreement rather than a problem with the writing.)

    --> In several places there was a lack of creativity with turn of phrase. One passage uses the phrase "there are times" too many times.

    --> The author uses the definite article in a number of places were the indefinite article would have been more appropriate. In the passage I marked as an example, Kvothe talks about going "deeper into the city" without any prior mention of having entered any city, much less being on the verge of going deeper into it.

    --> In another place, a beautiful metaphor was ruined when the author spelled out his meaning explicitly. Some metaphors are more powerful if left implied, resting behind the words for the observant reader to find on his own. In this instance, it went from beautiful metaphor to so-so analogy.

    I also have a much more fundamental, underlying problem with the entire storyline. That is the quality of Kvothe as a character. He's portrayed as a superhuman hero with a towering intellect and dazzling physical prowess. Kvothe can do nothing wrong; no puzzle is too difficult and no problem too big to handle. He can thrive under any circumstance and no lady can resist his advances (neither can beautiful goat-men, for that matter). He wins over the most cynical skeptics and his knowledge of the arts and sciences is without equal. Kvothe advises kings and kills demons. He can even run a clean and comfortable bed-and-breakfast. Kvothe, himself, is his own story's

    . And that, to me, it is the ultimate expression of unimaginative writing. Supposedly Mr. Rothfuss wrote

    over the course of a decade or more. You'd think, with all that time to contemplate and mull over his book, he could come up with something more interesting than (ironically) "The Most Interesting Man in the World."

  • Mark Lawrence

    I'll give this 5* with no begrudging. I'm pretty easy with my 5*, they're not reserved for the best book I've ever read, just very good books. I thought The Name of the Wind was "very good". I read it in what for me was a very short span of time - it had that 'more-ish' quality that best sellers need.

    Can I see what makes this the single best selling epic fantasy for a generation (apart from George Martin's series)? No. Excepting that perhaps the lesson is that to be head and shoulders above your

    I'll give this 5* with no begrudging. I'm pretty easy with my 5*, they're not reserved for the best book I've ever read, just very good books. I thought The Name of the Wind was "very good". I read it in what for me was a very short span of time - it had that 'more-ish' quality that best sellers need.

    Can I see what makes this the single best selling epic fantasy for a generation (apart from George Martin's series)? No. Excepting that perhaps the lesson is that to be head and shoulders above your competition in sales "all" you need is to be better by a nose - after that the non-linear dynamics of the market take over and elevate you to godhood.

    I loved the writing, and that's very important to me. Rothfuss often treads the thin line between prose and poetry, and fortunately it's excellent poetry that he brushes up against. The quality of the writing breathes magic into even fairly ordinary scenes, and makes some of the important ones extraordinary.

    The story itself is mostly compelling. It uses the reverse of the device I saw recently in Blood Song of a framing story that's not in the first person, delivering up a first person narrative. Our hero, Kvothe has bags of attitude and is a total genius at everything. To balance out his 'all power' we have his poverty, bad luck, tendency to dig himself into a hole, and his powerful enemies.

    Kvothe's real powerful enemy sits in the background as a motivator (& presumably story for books 2 & 3) while his 'school-boy' adversary at the university fills in for bad guy for most of the book.

    Like Blood Song, and many other really successful books, TNOTW is at its core a school story. Harry Potter, Wizard of Earthsea etc all feature magic schools, for Blood Song and Enders' Game it was a battle school, but the point is that the schools + lessons + masters combo sells bucket loads if you write it really well and plumb it into a compelling larger picture.

    With magic the school system also provides a painless way of educating your readers in the magic-system you have (by virtue of it being delivered through formal education) elected to use.

    Was there anything wrong with it? For me the whole 'and then I broke another string' and 'I was very hungry and dirty in Tarbean' sections were rather slow and lengthy - I understand their role in the story but they felt overplayed. And at the end the whole business with the draccus felt tangential and diluted the endgame for me. But no, nothing of great significance.

    A final observation: throughout the book we (like Kvothe) are constantly aware of money. Kvothe's poverty is a driver and source of tension. He is constantly coming into money, losing it, incurring costs. We almost know the contents of his purse at any time and the price of all his needs. To me this was very reminiscent of Dostoyevsky's work (and to a lesser extent, Dickens) where a similar focus on the number of coins in our character's pocket is maintained and the need to cover their expenses drives much of the story.

    In short though, given the impossible level of expectation built up by years of hearing how incredible this book is ... the text made a very good attempt to live up to its reputation.

    .

  • Rob

    I have no interest in imagining I'm someone who is stronger, deadlier, smarter, sexier, etc. than myself - a famed hero in a milqtoast world little different from modern North America.

    I read fantasy to immerse myself in strange worlds ripe with danger and conflict. To uncork primal wonders. And there is none of that in Rothfuss' book.

    His world is about as strange and dangerous as a mashed potato sandwich. His protagonist is comically overblown wish fullfillment for people who weren't popular i

    I have no interest in imagining I'm someone who is stronger, deadlier, smarter, sexier, etc. than myself - a famed hero in a milqtoast world little different from modern North America.

    I read fantasy to immerse myself in strange worlds ripe with danger and conflict. To uncork primal wonders. And there is none of that in Rothfuss' book.

    His world is about as strange and dangerous as a mashed potato sandwich. His protagonist is comically overblown wish fullfillment for people who weren't popular in college. I'm absolutely mystified that this novel is so highly regarded by so many.

    I welcome fans of the book to explain its appeal. Specifically:

    *

    . I found the quality of the prose very poor. Cliches abound, the author tells rather than shows, and the language is neither poetic nor elegant. So for those who find the writing quality high, I'd like to hear some examples of writing they feel

    poor quality.

    *

    . I have no interest in wish fullfilment in fiction. So what other content does this novel offer me as a reader? Is there something in the plot or setting that makes this novel stand out to you as exceptional?

  • Samantha

    I have so many unanswered questions and I'm not even mad about it.

  • Cait • A Page with a View

    Holy special snowflake, Gary Stu.

    You know the type of socially awkward insecure guy who seems to lurk in the corner of every university class trying to correct everyone and whose only purpose is to make sure the world at large realizes just

    he is at everything? And despite never seeing any actual evidence that he's God's gift to humanity, you genuinely DO NOT CARE either way and just want him to shut up? Welcome to 600+ pages narrated by that guy.

    I wanted to love this book SO mu

    Holy special snowflake, Gary Stu.

    You know the type of socially awkward insecure guy who seems to lurk in the corner of every university class trying to correct everyone and whose only purpose is to make sure the world at large realizes just

    he is at everything? And despite never seeing any actual evidence that he's God's gift to humanity, you genuinely DO NOT CARE either way and just want him to shut up? Welcome to 600+ pages narrated by that guy.

    I wanted to love this book SO much because of the hype that I dragged myself through the entire thing while desperately trying to ignore how much I loathed the main character.

    Kvothe is awesome at basically everything he does without even trying and everyone he meets either worships him or hates him & is out to get him. This was fun at first, but then it's like ok we get that he can master everything in a few days instead of years. Where is the story. Kvothe's parents are killed, so he becomes a street kid and then gets into university at a shockingly young age, where he continues to view himself as some struggling outsider. He becomes a legend because he talks the university into not only lowering his tuition, but paying him to attend. And every time he does something dumb, they decide to move him up a level instead of expelling him. The secondary characters were mostly good for emphasizing just how rare and amazing Kvothe is.

    I love wisecracking clever guys who are good at everything and make you want to root for them. Kvothe was not fun, witty, or even

    anything in particular. The story kind of meandered around with the only connecting theme being that Kvothe is impervious to the world's attempts to bring him down. Someone breaks a string on his lute? He's suddenly the greatest lute player ever MINUS 1 STRING *gasp.*

    just about sums this book up.

    The author kept having the narrator refer to the typical fantasy story in order to point out how he wasn't being cliche. Like he'd straight out say that Kvothe didn't follow the format of the "young boy, the hero. His parents are killed. He sets out for vengeance" and meets an old guy who tests and trains him... but no, that basically IS his story. Except it's nowhere near as adventurous as other fantasy novels. Every single cliche thing that some middle aged guy could write into his wish-fulfillment protagonist is in here, but nothing particularly exciting ever really happens. (And I honestly don't mind Gary Stus too much as long as they DO something or have a complex story arc).

    I LOVED the beginning with Kvothe working at a bar in the middle of nowhere, but the story quickly slowed down when he began telling his life story to the Chronicler. It's well written so it was actually more peaceful than dull for a bit. I did like the part with Kvothe learning about sympathy and names! It's fun to see influences of other religions and cultures woven into fantasy novels. I did enjoy chunks of this story because it flowed well and was a world I'd typically be into! So maybe 2.5 stars?

    However, Kvothe absolutely did not need a full book to only BEGIN the "foundation of a story to build upon." Hardly anything happened here and I am just

    . I kept trying to convince myself I liked it, but... no. It was insufferable and void of any emotion, actually. There really wasn't much conflict or growth or any true story. It was like a lecture on the greatness of Kvothe without showing anything too meaningful or interesting. And there was very little wizardness to this story.

    I was told to read this because of my Tolkien obsession, but I really fail to see how this even remotely falls in the same genre. This book isn't

    , but it honestly might be the most overhyped one I've ever read.

  • Melissa ♥ Dog Lover ♥ Martin

    MY BLOG:

    This is only part of the prologue to THE NAME OF THE WIND that drew me right in, the whole prologue was so bea

    MY BLOG:

    This is only part of the prologue to THE NAME OF THE WIND that drew me right in, the whole prologue was so beautifully written it pulled me right into the book.

    I would never had found this amazing book if I wasn't watching a youtube video about books and then looking it up on goodreads to see that so many of my friends loved it. I immediately bought it and I'm just blown away. I CAN. NOT. BELIEVE this was Patrick Rothfuss debut novel! Who writes like this? Why can't I write like this? Ye gods, this book is beyond amazing, Rothfuss writing style is amazing. It flows... like water, I have only thought this once before reading a novel.

    This is a big tome of a book with 700 + pages and there is not one moment of boredom or dragging. NOT. ONE. MOMENT.

    I am totally in love with Kvothe The Bloodless! He is telling his story from his Inn to a chronicler. We get to learn about Kvothe's story from when he was a child. There is a tragedy in young Kvothe's life and he lives on the streets for a few years, he finds some friends and they help each other. Kvothe does have to resort to stealing and begging but what would you do when you have nothing, but he is a smart boy and he is kind. He finds a way to help himself out and decides he's going to University :-) But it's the little kindnesses of people and Kvothe himself that touch my heart.

    Brings a damn tear to my eye. Well, a lot of the book brings a tear to my eye and of course I wanted to kill a certain person named Ambrose but we won't go there!

    Kvothe plays the lute :-) He's very good at it and it helps him out on many occasions when he is strapped for money when he gets into University. And get in he does, through being smart... he's so smart to do the things that he does to get into the University and to stay there. I mean a poor boy who walked around part of his life without shoes and just trying to make it through the nights outside in the freezing cold with little to eat. He made it and he struggles and he's fierce and he's a hero!!!!! Every time someone brought him down he came back up! He never gave up! He is the best kind of hero, a kind person but he does get the best of some evil people when he has to and I love it, oh how I love it.

    I'm really glad Kvothe found a couple of really good friends at the school because he had so much against him. So many bad things would happen, but like I said, he would find a way to rise back up. He even found a love interest but it didn't really get to go anywhere but that is another story.

    Let me just throw in two more

    -->I can't help myself, the book has so many good stuff it's hard to pick just a few.

    You can't help but be proud of Kvothe and his determination to get what he wants and doing anything to get it.

    Another part showing how nice and good he is, he gives a simple girl a charm to make her feel better.

    For the love of God, if you haven't read this book and love these kinds of high fantasy novels, READ IT! If you have had it on your shelf debating on reading it, READ IT! If you have never heard of it up until now, buy it and READ IT! It's one of the best and it's on my favorites list now... just look on Goodreads, there it is, under favorites!

    There are soooo many wonderful characters in this book, even the ones we only meet for awhile. And yes there are evil ones, but that's the way of a great book. Simply amazing!

    I think we should stop in at the Waystone Inn and have a pint and talk for a bit.

    I also bought the second book on the same day because I could at the time and I knew I would love these books. I just knew it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Petrik

    As an avid adult fantasy reader, out of all books that I’ve been recommended to, Name of the Wind has always been recommended to me the most. Google, Goodreads, book reviewing sites, 9gag, even some people who don't read a lot of fantasy books, they all praised the series and now that I’ve read it,

    In terms of plot, the book is actu

    As an avid adult fantasy reader, out of all books that I’ve been recommended to, Name of the Wind has always been recommended to me the most. Google, Goodreads, book reviewing sites, 9gag, even some people who don't read a lot of fantasy books, they all praised the series and now that I’ve read it,

    In terms of plot, the book is actually highly simplistic. Kvothe Kingkiller, Kvothe the Bloodless, Kvothe the Arcane, the man of many names will tell the story of his life to Chronicler, who will write Kvothe’s entire chronicle, starting from his childhood until his present life as an innkeeper in Waystone Inn. Kvothe will tell the entire chronicle of his life within 3 days and Name of the Wind encompassed only Day 1 of it, that’s it, that’s really the basic premise of the story. You could even call this book a memoir high fantasy if you want.

    Now, if you haven’t read this book yet, you’re probably wondering why this book is one of the most highly acclaimed fantasy books. Honestly, for me, it’s not the best out there, it’s definitely amazing and there are a lot of factors in the book that worked together towards that result. However, there’s one single element in the book that excels above all the other.

    Could be, I mean, this is a totally character driven book and if the characters aren’t well written the book is pretty much screwed. The whole book is told only from Kvothe’s perspective, it’s written in 3rd person POV for the present frame, shifting to 1st person POV during the flashback sequence which means, you’ll be seeing the 1st person POV so much more than the other. Trust me that they are so well written, Kvothe is a great character and his narrative is so compelling, NotW is his coming of age tale, right from the time when he was 8 years old up to 15 years old.

    We will read Kvothe’s struggle during this period of time and yes, they’re an ebb and flow of fortune and disaster. Plus, the addition of great side characters such as Bast, Simmone, Elodin and Auri makes the book more intriguing. However, no, it’s not the characters that dazzled the most for me.

    Well, it’s true that the world-building is fantastic and intricate, it even includes its own currency, mythology, legends, songs, a unique magic system called Sympathy and for a fantasy book, somehow all of them seemed so realistic and yet, no, it’s not the world-building.

    No, definitely not. Don’t come into this book expecting a lot of actions, war or great climax scenes, you’ll be massively disappointed. There are probably only around 20 pages in total out of 663 pages for its action scenes. NotW will not pull you into this grand tale of Good vs Evil that can be found in the usual epic fantasy stories where the characters struggle against the villains to save the world. In fact, you could even count this book to have zero actions if you want and this sparked close to zero intensity to the story. The scarce intensity is the sole reason why I didn’t rate this book a full 5 stars, fantasy or not, reading a memoir for 663 pages can be a bit tedious when the plot moves at a snail pace with no intensity despite how well written it is. So no, it’s not the actions.

    There’s a huge emphasis on music right from the beginning of the story until the end and let’s face it, no matter what the genre is, we are all obsessed with music. Music is really integral to the quality of the book, it’s insane how well written the depiction of music and sounds in the book are. The way the fingers and strings dances to form the music and I can hear the audience in the tavern cheers when Kvothe played the lute vigorously, I can hear the silence of the crowd when Kvothe stopped playing and most of all, I can feel the emotions oozing out of the audience through the music that was created specifically through words. My favorite scene in the book is every time

    , a tragic ballad was performed. It’s so masterfully written and right now, I have my own perception of how this song should sound like in my head and I can’t wait to see how Lin Manuel Miranda’s rendition of this song for the upcoming TV series adaptation of the book sounds like.

    It’s really a tricky business to combine the right formula with all these elements in a book, especially with music being one of them but Rothfuss managed to do it.

    Top-notch prose. I can’t stress this highly enough, there’s a glimpse of grace in almost every word you’ll find in the book. Without Rothfuss’s prose, this book would probably receive a 2 or 3 stars rating from me. Patrick Rothfuss is a master craftsman at words and his prose deserves only the highest of praise from me. There are myriad amounts of quotable (or should I say Kvothable) statements in the whole book that I feel like writing them all down in my notebook. (Yes, I did.)

    It’s meticulous, beautiful, and poetic. It’s obvious how the 14 years of revision and editing brought fruition to this marvelous result.

    By the end of this book, I realized The Name of the Wind has immersed me into an intricate role play situation. Throughout my time reading the book, I am not just the reader who read a book called The Name of the Wind, I am not the Chronicler who wrote Kvothe’s journey, I am not Kvothe’s loyal apprentice, I am the one they called Reshi, Bloodless, Six-String and I am the

    in the chronicle.


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