The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith

The Silkworm

Private investigator Cormoran Strike returns in a new mystery from Robert Galbraith, author of the #1 international bestseller The Cuckoo's Calling.When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days—as he has done before—and she wants Strike to find...

Title:The Silkworm
Author:
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Edition Language:English

The Silkworm Reviews

  • Jill

    is the tenth J.K. Rowling novel I’ve read. I believe that after ten often gargantuan novels I can make fairly accurate generalizations about her writing. And it saddens me to say that she keeps making the same mistakes.

    Most glaring is her treatment of female characters. In the Cormoran Strike mystery series, we have another female character of much greater intrigue shunted to the side in favor of a male protagonist, aka Hermione Granger Syndrome. Robin is Strike’s young personal ass

    is the tenth J.K. Rowling novel I’ve read. I believe that after ten often gargantuan novels I can make fairly accurate generalizations about her writing. And it saddens me to say that she keeps making the same mistakes.

    Most glaring is her treatment of female characters. In the Cormoran Strike mystery series, we have another female character of much greater intrigue shunted to the side in favor of a male protagonist, aka Hermione Granger Syndrome. Robin is Strike’s young personal assistant who could definitely contribute to mystery solving but mostly answers phones, schedules appointments, makes coffee, and provokes male gazing. The thing is, Robin is much more fascinating to me than Strike! Robin is desperate, unsure, diffident but ambitious—she would have been a fabulous heroine for a detective series about a woman trying to break into a traditionally male profession. Strike, on the other hand, does not interest me as a protagonist: he’s arrogant and infallible (sorta reminds you of a character whose name rhymes with Barry Lotter, non?), meaning that whenever Strike eliminates a suspect from contention, I know him to be absolutely right, simply because J.K. Rowling writes Strike in a way that he is always right. For all of Rowling’s characterization skills, Strike is lacking. He has a cool backstory—missing leg, missing rockstar father—but none of it manifests itself in his psyche or quotidian actions. They are just things we

    about him; like, oh hey, that’s Cormoran Strike, he lost his leg in Afghanistan and his dad is a famous guitarist.

    In general, I find J.K. Rowling’s characterization maddeningly brilliant. She’s super into the physicality of her characters. In

    the first few chapters serve no other purpose than to introduce the story’s players. But we are told who these people are, with special emphasis on their attractiveness and one-word descriptors: he’s the

    one and she’s the

    one. Rowling is an expert at character portraits but you can only know the characters on her unique terms; there’s no room for personal interpretation. It’s as if she is this master dollmaker. Each character is impeccably painted, you can admire the surface details for hours, but if you cracked the dolls open, they’d be hollow. Nothing murks beneath the detailed yet limited picture Rowling has painted us.

    And yet, she’s a magnificent plotter, a skill really well-suited to the mystery genre which gives me hope for any subsequent installments (though I will perpetually groan about Strike’s usurpation of the protagonist role in lieu of Robin). She carefully charts her reveals and includes tons of clever but useless information to throw you off. I’m not the biggest fan of how she writes climaxes—this isn’t participatory mystery where you can solve alongside the detective; you must wait for Mind-Numbingly Boring Detective Genius Cormoran Strike to figure it out and share his conclusions with you—but the underlying plot structure is solid. I’d just love to see her combine this knack for plot with deepened characters and themes. Otherwise, it’s forgettable.

  • Aisling

    J.K Rowling releases a novel under a pseudonym? Then announces that said novels sequel is already written and will be released in

    ??

    is how I imagine she looks right now.

    Edit Feb 2014: We have a name, release date AND a synopsis?!?! Bloody hell!

  • Mohammed Arabey

    I still see him as "Hugh Jackman" :),with some hair style to match, & Emma Watson as his adorable blonde, smart secretary, Robin.

    I still see him as "Hugh Jackman" :),with some hair style to match, & Emma Watson as his adorable blonde, smart secretary, Robin.

    Mohammed Arabey

    Actual Read :

    from 31st July 2014

    To 15 Aug. 2014

    **************************************************

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    First '

    ' is hidden

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  • Roch
  • Raeleen Lemay

    I FINALLY FINISHED THIS THING. And it was great! I actually liked this book more than the first one, but just by a hair.

    Highly recommend getting the audiobooks for these.

  • Nataliya

    And just like that, J.K. Rowling under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith takes on the familiar to her world of writing and publishing, bringing to light the petty conflicts, backstabbing attitudes, hurtful gossips and inflated egos. The bared claws and

    And just like that, J.K. Rowling under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith takes on the familiar to her world of writing and publishing, bringing to light the petty conflicts, backstabbing attitudes, hurtful gossips and inflated egos. The bared claws and at-your-throat attitudes, the dislikes and grudges held between successful writers and less successful ones, the wannabe writers, the ones who can and cannot write well, the agents, the publishers - it all looks like an ugly mess, to say the least.

    This unpleasant world serves as a backdrop for a rather gruesome murder

    that matches precisely the final scene in the victim's book. The victim,

    , is a not-too-successful writer and, frankly, a very unpleasant person, whose latest book seems to focus on trash-talking everyone connected to him in the literary world and personal life and pisses off quite a number of people.

    In fact,

    It, of course, falls to the private detective

    (who recently solved

    , earning himself some notoriety and a bit of cash) to untangle this mess and find the killer. Yet again he's aided by his secretary

    who, having worked with Strike for a while now, dreams of receiving some investigative training herself, seeing that she has a knack for the job - while struggling to explain her love for the job and admiration for her gruffy boss to her way more conventional fiancé Matthew.

    Rowling continues the pattern she set in the first Strike book.

    , through long interviews with suspects, through long treks on the streets of London, with many false trails and red herrings, guided by Strike's unerring sense and skill. The mystery is slow-moving and lacks the easy 'gotcha!' moments, hinged instead on character studies, allowing the suspects to slowly reveal their inner selves full of shallow and sometimes quite dark unpleasantness, propelled by almost casually shrewd observations of social inequalities and prejudices.

    Every character (short of almost idealized Strike and Robin - just for once can Cormoran Strike

    be wrong about

    ?) gets the

    which makes them come alive even when you'd rather them not. The plotting is intricate, the multiple plot strands so tightly woven together that it's a pleasure to look back at the end of the story and see how they all were coming together. And even the annoying turn in the last quarter of the book when Strike has solved the murder but the readers are kept waiting for the final reveal does not spoil the enjoyment of the story.

    All in all, I enjoyed this book quite a bit. While not perfect, it captures Rowling's talent as a storyteller and a master plotter quite well.

    I'll be quite happy to follow the adventures of Strike and Robin for quite some time.

  • Alejandro

    ( Yes ;) Pun intended! )

    If you are respectably active on the reading community, it will be no surprise that this "Robert Galbraith" is really the mega-famous writer J.K. Rowling, author of the ultra-mega-famous book series of

    . Why bother on making up the pseudonym when it was revealed after like two weeks when the first novel of this different series got out, that's a mystery to me! (Yes, another pun intended :P ).

    Evidently

    ( Yes ;) Pun intended! )

    If you are respectably active on the reading community, it will be no surprise that this "Robert Galbraith" is really the mega-famous writer J.K. Rowling, author of the ultra-mega-famous book series of

    . Why bother on making up the pseudonym when it was revealed after like two weeks when the first novel of this different series got out, that's a mystery to me! (Yes, another pun intended :P ).

    Evidently the genre, topics and setting of the

    book series is totally different from what you find on

    , but there are other authors writing different kind of genres and to different target audiences, and still they keep their own established author names.

    Anyway, the relevant point here is that "Robert Galbraith" doesn't exist but J.K. Rowling definitely exist and a lot in the literary world.

    While this still is a fictional detective mystery novel, I think that easily can be one of the most personal books that J.K. Rowling ever written. Due that in the first book of this series, she chose the world of modeling and couture, but in this second novel she is opting to use the world of publishing books as the ambiance for the mystery to solve.

    The story is set like eight months later of the previous book, and if you hadn't read it yet, but you just can't wait to read this one, you can do it, since while it's a series, you will get the very basic highlights that you need to know to get into the second book

    without spoiling the culprit on the first novel. So, you can even read both books in reverse order and you still be able to enjoy and get surprised in both novels.

    Now, Cormoran Strike's business is rising up thanks to his success in solving the Lula Landry's case. The lovely Robin is still his assistant (

    ) and the good thing is that her role in this book series will be growing and growing. While Robin was my "anchor" on the first novel and the main reason to keep reading and reading the first book, I am truly glad to mention that I still love Robin

    now I do like a lot the character of Cormoran Strike too and there is no doubt that he is the truly main character of the series. The two of them now are making a wonderful team.

    (Yes, this is a third pun intended! Please, indulge me! ;) )

    Strike has been quite busy getting a lot of clients meaning that his business of private detective is finally afloat. However, he is kinda dissapointed that many of these cases are basically discovering cheating spouses or crooked politicians, so when he finds in front of him what it seems the chance of helping a helpless old woman to find her husband, he accepts even while the chance of getting a payment out of this seems really unlikely.

    I am truly glad to mention that while the first book took like an 80% of writing to boost my interest, in here, it was right from the beginning. In the first book, it was like monotonous interviews basically asking the same questions and re-living the same crime scene on and on and on...zzzh...mmh? Oh, right...

    In here, while he still does interviews, each of those are really interesting, asking different stuff, looking for different angles on the case. Also, another good thing was that while in the first book, you get to know irrelevant moments of Strike's personal life, in this second novel, Rowling was able to exploit each personal moment to be totally involved in the case. The story is focused on the case, however there were some scenes mentioning other cases where Strike is working too. Yes, I understand that in real life, detectives work in several cases at the same time but in literature, one doesn't want to lose time reading about irrelevant cases that aren't the main story.

    I commented on the first book that it could be better with less pages, and I was glad to see that this second novel has less pages than the first book, making the rhythm of the story more fluent. However, if Rowling can make the third novel (since I do hope the making of a third book in the series) with even less pages. I really think that this book series can be a total blast having novels with 300 pages or less focusing in scenes only about the main case.

    I was delighted to know that I was wrong about who the culprit was on this case. I think that any reader of detective novels invested time in the middle of the reading experience trying to deduce who did it. And again, J.K. Rowling surprised me with a great process by Strike joining the clues and exposing the case. And when Strike is explaining it, you say: "Wow! Yes, he's right. All those clues were there!"

    Well, J.K. Rowling, you did it again!!! And even better!!!

    This second book is a real proof that lightnings can strike twice!

    J.K. Rowling brought magic to the hearts of readers with

    and now she is thrilling them with

    Definitely this second novel is an enormous improvement from the overall reading experience of the first book, now the book series is on tracks and I can hardly wait for the third novel!

    Highly recommended!

    It's not an easy task, but every day I do my best to read a bit of all those novels out there. ;)

  • Ferdy

    Disappointing, it wasn't awful but it wasn't good either. It was all rather predictable and generic, I wouldn't have minded the cliches and obviousness of it all if the main characters (Strike and Robin) had stood out in some way. Sadly, they didn't. I didn't care about either of them… I actually kind of hated both.

    -I wasn't a fan of the writing, there were a number of times where I came across sentences that didn't flow very well. Some of the more 'difficult' words seemed t

    Disappointing, it wasn't awful but it wasn't good either. It was all rather predictable and generic, I wouldn't have minded the cliches and obviousness of it all if the main characters (Strike and Robin) had stood out in some way. Sadly, they didn't. I didn't care about either of them… I actually kind of hated both.

    -I wasn't a fan of the writing, there were a number of times where I came across sentences that didn't flow very well. Some of the more 'difficult' words seemed to be added in just to make the writing seem more impressive but it only ended up doing the opposite.

    -There was nothing actually impressive or genius about Strike's detective skills or intelligence, the only reason he came across as half competent was because most of the people around him were completely thick. I mean, literally everybody on the police force were thickos… Yea, I could maybe buy a few of them being dim or lazy or something but not all of them. Most police officers have years of experience and various training/qualifications, not to mention all of them have access to countless resources and other experts (criminal psychologists and the like). I very much doubt Strike could compete with that — so yea, the only way to make his character come out on top and solve everything was by making everyone else dumb, which was plain lazy writing.

    -I didn't like the heavy handed portrayal of Robin and Matthew's relationship. It's so obvious they'll end up splitting up because of Matthew not supporting Robin's quest to be an investigator, the amount of times he was shown as not understanding Robin or her work was ridiculous. It kept cropping up over and over, it was like Rowling was trying to make extra sure that her readers knew how unsuitable Robin and Matthew were for each other whilst simultaneously not-so-subtly showing how us perfect Strike was for Robin and how he understood her. Ugh, it made for nauseating reading.

    -What was with Robin being all submissive and servant-like when it came to Strike? Yea, he was her boss but she went above and beyond her work duties… She acted more like a downtrodden, dutiful wife the way she fetched things for him and made him tea and coffee. Of course, Strike loved her meek, submissive wifey behaviour and thought she was such a good little girl whenever she was quiet and did all his bidding. Ugh, it was all rather misogynistic and cringey.

    -It was laughable that so many beautiful and successful women (like Nina) kept throwing themselves at overweight, hairy, unsuccessful, middle aged, bland Strike. Yea, bloody right.

    It was disgusting and off putting when Strike called Nina desperate and needy for wanting to sleep with him straight away… Yet he didn't think any badly of himself for sleeping with her when he didn't even like her, at least Nina slept with him because she for some reason fancied him… Whereas he basically slept with her just because and as a thanks for the information she provided on his case (though she didn't know that), his behaviour was rather prostitute-like… He had no right to be casting judgement on anyone else. The prick.

    -There were so many stereotypes of women, they were either some variation of a Mary Sue or they were shallow, desperate losers who threw themselves at Strike or were completely messed up. None of the women came across as real people.

    -What was with all the female characters eating/drinking things like soups/salads/water whist Strike was chugging down pints and having steak and chips? It was irritating to read the females always eating such healthy/little food whilst Strike stuffed his face with all sorts. Has Rowling never met any women who eats takeaways or desserts or something?!

    -I actually think I would have enjoyed reading

    (the much talked about manuscript in the book) more than this — it sounded wonderfully bonkers.

    -I did really love some of the side characters, they were infinitely more interesting than Strike and Robin. I also enjoyed the setting and descriptions of London - it was captured really well.

    All in all, this was just a run of the mill mystery novel — the main characters were so blah and it was obvious who the bad guy was as soon as they were introduced. Yea, I expected more from Rowling.

  • Karl

    As much as I enjoyed the first Strike book this second venture was rather a let down. What we have in "The Silkworm" are alternating chapters of the main character lamenting about the pain he is suffering from his injured leg, and his assistant Robin suffering from angst about her relationship with her soon to be husband. These concepts were rather new and interesting in the first installment, but have grown weary and tiresome being constantly replayed in this second. The pair travel from bar to

    As much as I enjoyed the first Strike book this second venture was rather a let down. What we have in "The Silkworm" are alternating chapters of the main character lamenting about the pain he is suffering from his injured leg, and his assistant Robin suffering from angst about her relationship with her soon to be husband. These concepts were rather new and interesting in the first installment, but have grown weary and tiresome being constantly replayed in this second. The pair travel from bar to bar to eat meal after meal drinking and ignoring the elephant in the room which is their own relationship.

    J.K. Rowling does noting to further the overall plot along. She does nothing to grow the characters only to trundle them through their repetitive motions. Yes the mystery has changed plot from a murder of a starlet in the first book to a murder of and author in the second book.

    The assumption is that the Silkworm takes place a few months after the finish of the first book, and the dates dropped within the text indicate that they were written in the 2010/2011 time frame. Most likely without a pause between them. Ms. Rowling did not give herself enough time to re-charge her batteries. Just enough time to re-tread her tires. She is capable of so much better. After all what was the rush to get this book to market ... oh perhaps a book contract as it certainly can't be for the need of money.

    Sadly, for the accomplished writer of books she has shown herself capable of, the book was not as good as it should have been.

  • Mohammed Arabey

    أو أكتب ريفيوهات مثلا، لا فارق

    أو أكتب ريفيوهات مثلا، لا فارق

    تسألني كيف أعرف كل هذا عن المنطقة والمبني، ألم تأتي معي من قبل في العام الماضي ، للتحقيق مع كورموران سترايك ومساعدته الفاتنة روبين في أول قضية كبري له؟ لتنتقل فعليا إلي لندن وتلك الشوارع من خلال صفحات الرواية؟ إن لم تفعل يمكنك العودة للقضية اﻷولي لاحقا

    فمكتب سترايك مشغولا اﻷن بأحداث قضيتنا

    والتي تبدأ بزوجة مؤلف يعاني أهمال الوسط اﻷدبي له، تطلب من كورموران سترايك أن يحقق في أختفاء زوجها في غيابه المعتاد كلما أراد اﻷختلاء بنفسه لكتابة رواية مثلا

    بالرغم من أن الموضوع معتادا إلا أنها قلقة علي حالته المزاحية وتريد أن تطمئن علي مكانه

    ليكتشف سترايك أن للمؤلف مخطوطة رواية قام باﻷنتهاء منها، تصف بوحشية وسخرية كل المحيطين بحياة المؤلف من وكلاء أعمال، ناشر، مراجع، مؤلف منافس تحظي رواياته بالبيست سيللر، عشيقته وحتي زوجته وأبنته..كل هؤلاء برموز ومحاكاة ساخرة، قبيحة وفجة

    بعض ما تم ذكره بالرواية حتي قد يهدم أسر، يحطم معنويات وسمعة من تم ذكرهم بالرواية

    رواية دودة القز

    المشكلة اﻷكبر ، فهي الطريقة الدموية البشعة التي سيجد سترايك عليها أوين المؤلف البائس

    ألم أقل لك أنه عش دبابير بحق

    أما المشكلة اﻷضخم، أن تلك المخطوطة تسربت...وقراها الكثير من الوسط اﻷدبي بلندن ، ووصلت لأغلب من تم ذكرهم بتلك المحاكاة الساخرة الفجة

    وبالطبع لا أحد يريد شهودا عليها..وبعضهم ذوي نفوذ ويسعون للتخلص من أي ممن يملكون أي نسخة من تلك المخطوطة

    وعلي سترايك أن يسارع الزمن لمعرفة مرتكب الجريمة قبل أن يجد نفسه مهددا بالقتل هو أيضا

    هل لها علاقة بالمجتمع السحري؟ أعتقد أن هاري ووزارة السحر عليها التحقيق في ذلك

    ليس هذا فحسب، فإختفاء المؤلف أوين ذكرني كثيرا في البداية بأختفاء صحفي المصري بالاهرام رضا هلال والمكالمات الغريبة من عائلات الرئيس السابق ووزير الداخلية

    وايضا كل الاساليب في الهجوم الشاذ بين المؤلفين وبعضهم ذكرني بهجوم مؤلف منافي الرب علي الكتاب الشباب وبعض هجوم الشباب علي نبيل فاروق وغيره بشكل غير موضوعي

    بل وهجوم الكثير من المؤلفين لجي كي رولينج بمجرد صدور روايتها الاولي بعد هاري بوتر، منصب شاغر

    هذا التعريف تم حذفه بمجرد معرفة انها جي كي رولبنج بأسم مستعار

    محمد العربي

    ["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>


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