Strong Vengeance by Jon Land

Strong Vengeance

1818: In the Gulf waters off the Texas coast, the pirate Jean Lefitte and his partner Jim Bowie launch an attack on the Mother Mary, a slave ship carrying an invaluable treasure.The Present: Fifth-generation Texas Ranger Caitlin Strong finds herself investigating the murder of the oil rig crew that had found the long-lost wreckage of the Mother Mary. The crew also uncovere...

Title:Strong Vengeance
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Edition Language:English

Strong Vengeance Reviews

  • Heather

    The first Caitlin Strong novel I read was fun. The Texas Rangers are an uncommon subject for a modern police mystery; a woman Ranger was even more interesting. But by the next book, the horrible stilted dialogue and incredibly far-fetched plot started to get to me. It's frustrating, since I actually like the cast of characters. But this entry in the series was downright unreadable. Every character sounds the same, and the plot was even more unbelievable than the previous book. Didn't finish it.

  • Tracy

    This is one of those books where you just fall in love with the female character, or at least I do. She is a strong lady who works in a mans world and doesn't take flack from anyone. She's helping to raise her boyfriends two teenage sons while he's in a Mexico jail for trying to protect his son. Add in an old unsolved crime along with some new attacks against homeland security and you have a mystery where you have no idea how all the pieces are going to fall into place. Caitlyn Strong though wor

    This is one of those books where you just fall in love with the female character, or at least I do. She is a strong lady who works in a mans world and doesn't take flack from anyone. She's helping to raise her boyfriends two teenage sons while he's in a Mexico jail for trying to protect his son. Add in an old unsolved crime along with some new attacks against homeland security and you have a mystery where you have no idea how all the pieces are going to fall into place. Caitlyn Strong though works her magic to protect everyone to the best of her abilities. Cort is the man who can understand Caitlyn let her be herself, and still love her. I really like the fact that amongst all the mystery there is still a love story going on. I have not ready any of the other Caitlyn Strong books, but this book makes me want to. Definitely makes this book a good read in my humble opinion.

    Disclosure: This book was provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley. The rating, review, and all opinions are my own

  • Terri Armstrong

    “Strong Vengeance” by Jon Land

    Texas Ranger Caitlin Strong is from the stock where legends are made, but Captain Tepper decides she needs to learn how to balance her two responsibilities: job and family. She is caring for her boyfriend’s sons Dylan Masters and Luke Tores. Cort Wesley Masters would be there, but he’s literally fighting to survive in a Mexican prison for the murder of a drug lord.

    Suddenly, Cort Wesley is out of jail. His old acquaintance Jones has a job for him. There’s a terror ce

    “Strong Vengeance” by Jon Land

    Texas Ranger Caitlin Strong is from the stock where legends are made, but Captain Tepper decides she needs to learn how to balance her two responsibilities: job and family. She is caring for her boyfriend’s sons Dylan Masters and Luke Tores. Cort Wesley Masters would be there, but he’s literally fighting to survive in a Mexican prison for the murder of a drug lord.

    Suddenly, Cort Wesley is out of jail. His old acquaintance Jones has a job for him. There’s a terror cell in San Antonio and his talents are needed. So, if Cort Wesley rids Texas and the world of this terror pack, he is free. Lesson to be learned: everything costs and nothing is free!

    This story has it all, two ships—one from the past and one present—love, fear, betrayal, treasure, Texas Rangers (of course), and a few grisly/sickening scenes that are so well-written they made me retch. I could go on all day. One concrete thing I will share, Teofilo Reyes Braga hauls away garbage—an ironic job for him.

    Blurred lines between lies and truth on both sides of the law, past and present with fierce tendrils linking them together and the exploding mushroom that is this story just gets bigger and bigger right in front of your eyes. The way Land weaves his tale caught me off guard at every junction, and I loved it!

    I would be utterly remiss if I didn’t mention the way Land portrayed the father and son relationship. Cort Wesley adores both his sons, but his relationship with Dylan was so expertly written, when those two shared a scene, I felt I was peeking in on something real.

    When I start a new novel, there’s some anxiety in the newness. I start reading and instantly feel that “fear.” Then, out of nowhere comes Caitlin Strong, my old friend with her SIG-Sauer and I am completely unafraid. I take her hand and allow her to lead me wherever she’d like. For me, that makes not only an amazing character, but comes from a class-act author!

    Reviewed by Terri Ann Armstrong, author of “How to Plant a Body”

  • Kristin Lundgren

    Could read more than a few pages. I lived in San Antonio for 4 years, and that is NOT how they talk - outlaws, trigger happy, it was just plain Texas for greenhorns. Some m may like it, I had to make it go away.

  • Judy

    Poor sentence structure was very distracting. And annoying.

  • Vic

    Strong Vengeance, the fourth Caitlin Strong episode, delivers a good story on multiple fronts. Caitlin, a fifth generation Texas Ranger and modern day Annie Oakley, has a quite a reputation with a gun. We know she can shoot straight; we know she’s tough as nails; we know she never backs down from a fight.

    In some ways, Caitlin Strong is a modern day wonder woman: career driven; passionate in carrying out her duties while maintaining impossibly high expectations for herself; successful in the viol

    Strong Vengeance, the fourth Caitlin Strong episode, delivers a good story on multiple fronts. Caitlin, a fifth generation Texas Ranger and modern day Annie Oakley, has a quite a reputation with a gun. We know she can shoot straight; we know she’s tough as nails; we know she never backs down from a fight.

    In some ways, Caitlin Strong is a modern day wonder woman: career driven; passionate in carrying out her duties while maintaining impossibly high expectations for herself; successful in the violent machismo world of law enforcement. Where she struggles is with her own feelings, especially the maternal feelings that are emerging while looking after Cort Wesley Masters’ two sons, Dylan and Luke.

    In Strong Vengeance, Caitlin finds herself hip deep in controversy when she becomes involved in an incident at the school attended by Cort Wesley’s sons. After being told to step back from her normal duties by her boss, Captain D.W. Tepper, Caitlin inadvertently becomes lead investigator in a murder mystery. Not the run of the mill mystery, but a case that will cross paths with an unsolved murder that was investigated by her father, grandfather and D.W. years earlier.

    Land brings back a number of essential characters who have come to represent Caitlin’s world. On going protagonist, Cort Wesley Masters, bad guy, good guy, hard hitting, straight shooting and unofficial helper of the Texas Rangers, thanks to his relationship with Caitlin. Colonel Paz, the irrepressible Venezuelan giant and Aztec warrior killing machine who has a strange, almost mystical link to Caitlin. And Mr. Jones from Homeland Security, representing the darker side of American intelligence operations who also figured in the take down of the militant cult, Patriot Suns, in an earlier episode.

    The plot line, although relevant and contemporary, seemed almost trite. Muslim extremist converts unhappy American Muslims to his cause in a plot to produce massive civilian casualties in Texas and across the United States. Shocking to me was my own reaction to this on going threat to all western nations: Ho hum. Ho Hum? How is it possible that in the twelve years since the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York I could feel so blasé about a Muslim terrorist plot? Have I gone numb to violence, to racial profiling, to disingenuous politics and governments lying to very people they are empowered to defend? To war without end? And if it’s happening to me, are others feeling the same way?

    By far the most intriguing element in Land’s on going series is the deliberately slow peeling back of Caitlin’s hard exterior. Book by book she is feeling her way into a state of intimacy with Cort Wesley and finding herself increasingly protective of and attached to his sons. Her relationship with her Captain, D.W. Tepper, continues to reveal the extent to which she was influenced by and now resembles her father and grandfather. No longer sure of herself or her feelings, Caitlin’s budding vulnerability is allowing her to become more believable and less a comic book heroine.

  • Lee

    It seems every author has one dud book in a series of otherwise good books. This is the dud. The characters were either shooting each other, or droning on about the Texas Rangers. I had the plot figured out about a third of the way through and ended up skimming the rest of the book. I'm glad I got this from the library and hadn't paid for a copy. I hope Jon Land steps back and does a better job on his next book.

  • Denis

    I have read the other books in the series and they were pretty god but this one was bad. The stories become more unbelievable eith each book and I don't think I will waste my time reading any of the others.

  • Gil

    My first Jon Land book; probably my last. Liked no character, found them each uninteresting and shallow. Even the names were a turn-off: Caitlin Strong? (Really? For god's sake -- her father and grandfather were the Rangers' two most legendary, and they're going to pick "Caitlin" as a name for a 5th-generation Ranger-to-be? And "Strong" is the best that Land could come up with? Maybe it's my own sexism coming up here, but in a novel names do serve a purpose.

    Portrayals of Mexicanos were consiste

    My first Jon Land book; probably my last. Liked no character, found them each uninteresting and shallow. Even the names were a turn-off: Caitlin Strong? (Really? For god's sake -- her father and grandfather were the Rangers' two most legendary, and they're going to pick "Caitlin" as a name for a 5th-generation Ranger-to-be? And "Strong" is the best that Land could come up with? Maybe it's my own sexism coming up here, but in a novel names do serve a purpose.

    Portrayals of Mexicanos were consistently insulting, and I felt that the whole Middle Eastern terrorist thing -- especially how it played out in the end-- was hokey. The prologue set the tone for the entire novel, singing the praises of how the Texas Rangers "helped to repel the Mexican invasions of 1842, as well as [shielded] the white settlers against Indian attacks over the next three years." I know, I know: White, good; Mexican and Indians bad, Kimosabe.

    I forced myself to get to the end just to see what happened to the bad guys. Even as the story climaxed in the last chapters, I skimmed them; I couldn't bring myself to keep reading through all the inane dialogue.

    After "[saving] the United States from the greatest threat it has ever faced" (interior jacket), Caitlin Strong and her rough-and-tumble boyfriend (who also has a goofy name, and who calls her "Ranger" throughout the book...ugh) smile, kiss, and talk about going to Disney World and fishing.

    As another reader commented below, every series has a dud. I will give Jon Land the benefit of the doubt and assume this was his one dud. But I'll move on to a different author for now.

  • David Dalton

    Jon Land is one of my favorite authors, and has been since I started reading him during my tour in Desert Shield/Storm back in the early 90's. This is my 4th Caitlin Strong book, and I plan to order the 5th one soon (as part of a Christmas Gift Card). Think of Caitlin as Chuck Norris's (Ranger Walker) little sister. His little sister who can kick some big butt! Once again another exciting story. Jon is really good at writing stories featuring a main character, and a partner. Blaine & Johnny

    Jon Land is one of my favorite authors, and has been since I started reading him during my tour in Desert Shield/Storm back in the early 90's. This is my 4th Caitlin Strong book, and I plan to order the 5th one soon (as part of a Christmas Gift Card). Think of Caitlin as Chuck Norris's (Ranger Walker) little sister. His little sister who can kick some big butt! Once again another exciting story. Jon is really good at writing stories featuring a main character, and a partner. Blaine & Johnny Wareagle for example. Also the same here, but it is Caitlin and Cort (a character with a shady/troubled past). These two work well together. It helps that they are lovers as well. Jon blends their strengths together and they are pretty tough to stop. I am about 3 books behind in this series, but I will knock out book 5 later this year and slowly catch up.


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