Cujo by Stephen King

Cujo

Outside a peaceful town in central Maine, a monster is waiting. Cujo is a two-hundred-pound Saint Bernard, the best friend Brett Camber has ever had. One day Cujo chases a rabbit into a bolt-hole - a cave inhabited by sick bats. What happens to Cujo, how he becomes a horrifying vortex inexorably drawing in all the people around him makes for one of the most heart-stopping...

Title:Cujo
Author:
Rating:
Edition Language:Spanish

Cujo Reviews

  • Dan

    I'm guessing that many of you own or have owned a dog at some point in your life. And, i'm also guessing that you'd consider said dog to be loyal to you and part of your family. So, I ask you, can you possibly imagine what you'd do if your dog went rabid?

    Pooch would lose his appetite. Start to become easily confused. Tired. His brain would melt and with that he'd forget about you. Forget the loyalty and love he held for you.

    He'd feel intense pain.

    In his eyes YOU would become the reason that he f

    I'm guessing that many of you own or have owned a dog at some point in your life. And, i'm also guessing that you'd consider said dog to be loyal to you and part of your family. So, I ask you, can you possibly imagine what you'd do if your dog went rabid?

    Pooch would lose his appetite. Start to become easily confused. Tired. His brain would melt and with that he'd forget about you. Forget the loyalty and love he held for you.

    He'd feel intense pain.

    In his eyes YOU would become the reason that he feels this pain.

    Mix this with a claustrophobic seige over a few days, some marital issues, a child that suffers from sleepless nights and you have Cujo.

    King really doesn't hold back any punches with this. Be warned. It's bleak, but an amazing read.

  • Lyn

    Writing a review about Cujo is a little like reminiscing about being a teenager and listening to Black Sabbath.

    Trying to describe it, and to put the experience in words, reveals the cartoonish elements in stark relief. But while being read, the novel is rich with storytelling and more complex than would seem on it's surface.

    And like the best of Sabbath: It rocks.

    Yes, it's about a town that gets eaten by a big, rabid dog, but King is able, and with some credibility, to tell a tale of modern par

    Writing a review about Cujo is a little like reminiscing about being a teenager and listening to Black Sabbath.

    Trying to describe it, and to put the experience in words, reveals the cartoonish elements in stark relief. But while being read, the novel is rich with storytelling and more complex than would seem on it's surface.

    And like the best of Sabbath: It rocks.

    Yes, it's about a town that gets eaten by a big, rabid dog, but King is able, and with some credibility, to tell a tale of modern paranoia and suspense, with elements of horror that are all too believable to a modern audience.

  • Nandakishore Varma

    I wrote in my review of

    that it was the scariest book that I ever read. Well, that may be, but there the horror ended when I closed the book.

    With Cujo, it started then...

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Every child is afraid of the monster that creeps upon him when the lights are out in the bedroom and mom and dad are safely ensconced in their

    I wrote in my review of

    that it was the scariest book that I ever read. Well, that may be, but there the horror ended when I closed the book.

    With Cujo, it started then...

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Every child is afraid of the monster that creeps upon him when the lights are out in the bedroom and mom and dad are safely ensconced in their room. They hide under the bed or in the closet. The moment the kid lets his guard down, it will creep out and slowly devour him, relishing every luscious bit of flesh. No amount of rationalising can take away the certainty of this fact, at least in the minds of the children.

    talks about this monster. And since it is the frightened child in each one of us that the ghost story talks to, we listen.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    Tad Trenton has a problem. There is a monster in his closet, biding its time to devour him; only the "Monster Words" his dad has written is preventing it from fulfilling his intent.

    Vic and Donna Trenton, Tad's parents, have their own monsters to fight - Vic's failing ad agency and Donna's recently concluded extra-marital affair. They move down to the town of Castle Rock, Maine to start a new life - unfortunately, the monsters also follow them.

    A monster of a different kind attacks Cujo, Brett Camber's huge good-natured St. Bernard, as he chases a rabbit down a hole and gets bitten by some very sick bats. The virus of rabies enters his bloodstream: his happy thoughts become tinged with red: and by the time Brett and his mother Charity leave home to visit her sister Holly, Cujo has fully transformed into a monster. He kills Brett's abusive father Joe and their neighbour Gary, and is awaiting an agonising death as Donna and Tad drive into Joe's garage to fix the car's starting problem.

    What happens next is what the novel is about - the stalled car, the woman and child trapped inside, the rabid dog outside - and the steadily mounting suspense culminating in a shattering climax.

    --------------------------------------------------------

    is much more disturbing than

    because of two things - one, the horror follows you after you leave the book and two, because the horror is very much in the real world. Here also, there is the dysfunctional family; however, Tad does not have the powers of Danny Torrance to see the horror out. He is very much a helpless child.

    Also, here the horror is random, incidental. As Steve says, Cujo was a "good" dog - the reason that he got bit by rabid bats while not having taken his anti-rabies shots was just coincidence. One feels, as one reads this novel, that monster in Tad's closet was not imaginary at all. It was the one which crawled out in the form of Cujo. Vic and Donna, being grownups, could not see it - Tad could.

    Read it only if you are such a fan of horror that you like to be seriously disturbed for a long period of time.

  • Edward Lorn

    Cujo is a hard book to read. It's a short book, but there are certain scenes that just gut me. And all those sections occur in the last 25 pages of the book. The first half of this book goes by rather quickly. Then Donna and Tad get stuck out at Camber's place and I simply do not want to continue reading. The first time I read this book was after having watched the movie. Cool enough flick. Slasher film with a dog instead of a masked killer. Survivor is the woman and her son. Rock on. I don't li

    Cujo is a hard book to read. It's a short book, but there are certain scenes that just gut me. And all those sections occur in the last 25 pages of the book. The first half of this book goes by rather quickly. Then Donna and Tad get stuck out at Camber's place and I simply do not want to continue reading. The first time I read this book was after having watched the movie. Cool enough flick. Slasher film with a dog instead of a masked killer. Survivor is the woman and her son. Rock on. I don't like that the dog was used as a monster, but I dealt with it because poor Cuje was sick. And then I read the book.

    There is a big fucking tie-in between Cujo and the rest of King's books that no one ever mentions. My theory is, as far as I know, not impossible. Firstly, Cujo's behavior in the book is constantly referred to as odd. This is aside from the fact that he has rabies. Many times, characters in the book refer to Cujo as more than just a sick dog. Secondly, the closet. Something's living in Tad's closet. This is made cement at the end of the book when Tad's father Vic watches the door knob turn and the door open all by its lonesome. Finally, Frank Dodd is called the monster of Castle Rock at the beginning of the book, and then King goes on to say that that monster returns in 1980. A monster. A monster that can take different forms. A monster that is active in Castle Rock during the time Pennywise is supposedly asleep in Derry. A monster that changes shapes. See where I'm going with this? Think of the gigantic bird that ravages the dance (at least I think it was a dance) in It. Now, stay with me, think about the fact that King wrote The Dead Zone, Cujo, and Pet Sematary all while writing It. Also there are mentions of this "monster" in both Insomnia and the Dark Tower series. Conspiracy theory established. Debunk in the comment section below.

    Notable names:

    George Bannerman, Johnny Smith, and Frank Dodd (The Dead Zone)

    Castle Rock (mentioned throughout the King-verse)

    In summation: If you read Cujo and are not in some way affected by the goings-down in the this book, I don't want to know you because you're an emotional cripple. This book is only bad in the sense that it drags out the worst of humanity and showcases it in the unrelenting sunlight and creates a monster out of a good dog. But this shit happens. It's life. Endings are not always happy things. Oh, and this is the last time I'm reading this book. I'm not doing this shit to myself again. Time for some My Little Pony. Later.

  • Antonio

    Alguien me puede decir

    Alguien me puede decir

    Ah sí, es cierto, debería hablar de la historia principal,

    es un perro san Bernardo cariñoso que todos aman, muy parecido a Beethoven, pero ocurre algo terrible, muy simple, nada del otro mundo, pero aun así terrible, le da rabia, y gracias a esta enfermedad, todo lo cariñoso y amoroso que pudo ser, se transforma en odio y ansias de matar, así el perro del que nadie sospecharía, se transforma en una maquina asesina.

    La primera parte del libro es algo desconcertante, porque de lo que menos hablan es del perro, parece más bien casos de familia o telenovela de bajo presupuesto, que si a una mujer le pega su marido, que si otra engaña al marido, que si un hombre va a perder su empleo, alguien gana la lotería, y a otro hombre todo le importa una mierda…

    Considere dejar el libro, pero seguí, y luego me di cuenta que era una estratagema de

    , para que después te des cuenta hasta qué punto se cumple la

    y todo lo que puede salir mal, saldrá mal, hasta llevar a los personajes a la situación catastrófica, e insalvable de enfrentarse a un bestia peluda de más de 100 kilos con rabia.

    Ahora, de vuelta a lo importante,

  • Mario

    4.5

    was a book I thought I was going to like, but not be scared of it (I mean, how scary can a rabid dog be, really?), but boy was I wrong with the second statement! This book did scare me. It still does when I think about it. It even reminded me of

    which is my favorite King's book, and that says quite a lot.

    is a story about a Saint Bernard dog who one day chased a rabbit into a bolt-hole. The problem was that the hole was filled with rabid bats, and

    4.5

    was a book I thought I was going to like, but not be scared of it (I mean, how scary can a rabid dog be, really?), but boy was I wrong with the second statement! This book did scare me. It still does when I think about it. It even reminded me of

    which is my favorite King's book, and that says quite a lot.

    is a story about a Saint Bernard dog who one day chased a rabbit into a bolt-hole. The problem was that the hole was filled with rabid bats, and one of them scratched Cujo. But the horror of this book does not begin there. It begins on page one, with Frank Dodd, but because I don't want to spoil anyone I will not say anything more about that, except that I wished that King focused on that aspect of the story a bit more since those parts scared me the most. When it comes to characters, as usual, King did not disappoint. Most of the characters were well flushed out, and it's not hard to care for their problems. But my main problem with this book is that around 50 pages could've been left out, and the story would not change a bit (especially Sharp Cereal Professor discussions; I honestly don't know what was the point of them). Apart from that, I really liked it, and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to read a scary story that will crawl under your skin, and stay there even after you close the book.

  • Dan Schwent

    When a two hundred pound St. Bernard goes rabid, no one is safe! Who will fall to Cujo before the disease he carries finishes him off?

    I'm just going to come out and say it. Most of this book feels like filler to me. I think King took what was potentially an award winning tale of terror and jammed as much padding into it as he could until it was one of his shorter novels. Basically, it's a fantastic short story wrapped in a soap opera I couldn't give two shits about.

    That being said, Cujo is a rea

    When a two hundred pound St. Bernard goes rabid, no one is safe! Who will fall to Cujo before the disease he carries finishes him off?

    I'm just going to come out and say it. Most of this book feels like filler to me. I think King took what was potentially an award winning tale of terror and jammed as much padding into it as he could until it was one of his shorter novels. Basically, it's a fantastic short story wrapped in a soap opera I couldn't give two shits about.

    That being said, Cujo is a really powerful book in places. While I didn't care about a lot of things on the periphery, the core of it is pretty terrifying and heart-wrenching. No one wants their beloved family pet to turn on them and a rabid dog trapping a woman and her child in a car for DAYS is damn horrifying. As opposed to most of his menaces, Cujo is all too plausible.

    The writing is good and the ending packs a huge punch. I sure didn't see that coming. It was like being kicked in the balls after you're already lying on the ground after being shot in the heart.

    While I found that there was a lot of fat on this bone, it was pretty good at the core. Or marrow, in this case. Three hard-earned stars.

  • Christy

    This book was so well written, the characters completely fleshed out, that it's very hard to believe King wrote this book so drunk that he doesn't even remember writing it! Wow! And to then win the British Fantasy Award...and (two!) movies. All I ever seemed to do when I was drunk was trash the house....and worse--hurt those who loved me closest (which is why, like King, I gave the stuff up over a year ago).

    What a complete page turner--very hard to

    This book was so well written, the characters completely fleshed out, that it's very hard to believe King wrote this book so drunk that he doesn't even remember writing it! Wow! And to then win the British Fantasy Award...and (two!) movies. All I ever seemed to do when I was drunk was trash the house....and worse--hurt those who loved me closest (which is why, like King, I gave the stuff up over a year ago).

    What a complete page turner--very hard to put down, especially when the action starts...impossible not to get your stomach in a terrible knot during the last part of the book, ugh--physically painful to read! Earlier on...very sad for dog lovers--before he loses all that was lovable. King is great at many things, and one he's done on several occasions is to write from a dog's point of view--which he does very well once again in Cujo--what happened to him was so unfair. and the tiniest bit of money for a yearly shot would have saved both Cujo from this agonizingly slow, painful, and miserable way to die, as well as the people!

    Of all of King's early novels, this is the only one that relies on horror that can actually happen to normal people....

    This book tells the stories of two very different families. Both with very real problems. Vic and Donna Trenton are facing a crisis in their marriage--infidelity on her part, which is broken off before Vic becomes aware. Unfortunately he finds out at the worst possible time; a time he really needs to focus on his Ad agency.....saving it from losing it's biggest client and plummeting the family out of their successful lifestyle. Their son Tad has his own demons...right in his bedroom closet (which

    .....the door opening when it's latched--and more. It's the only part of the novel which is outside the realm of real-life horror**note on this below). Steve the tennis pro does not take to the break-up very well and adds much more drama that could cost Tad and Donna their lives (or looking at it with an ironic twist possibly save them, because his actions bring Vic running home from his important meeting in New York...) The second family include blue collar Joe and Charity Chambers, and their son Brett--and oh boy, do they face a household of demons as well; including alcoholism, spousal abuse and child abuse....and (most important to this story) neglect of the family dog, especially when it comes to the vet.

    The first half of this book is spent excellently developing the characters (including an superb job with Cujo). When Vic has to leave for his meeting in New York, he leaves Donna with car problems....which leads to Donna and tiny Tad just barely making it to the Cambers' home garage (Joe is an excellent, inexpensive mechanic), when the car finally dies (in near 100 degree weather). Every person in the house is gone for a long time, and they are met by Cujo, whose illness has finally driven him mad. Here begins the gut-wrenching stakeout (for days trapped in the cars growing oven)......It's utterly horrifying, and I do not remember ever forgetting to breath as I read a book, but here I did forget---over and over....I couldn't take it (felt like ripping my own hair out at times!). This book took everything I physically had in me to not die of desperation myself......

    ***I need to add here: Edward Lorn's review adds some pretty cool tie-ins, that make that seemingly unimportant closet door much more interesting!!!!

  • Gorgona Grim

    Isuse Hriste na biciklu _________

    Nedeljama nakon čitanja ove knjige osećaj izmoždenosti i devastiranosti me ne napušta, utisak je i dalje prejak. Iz neobjašnjivih razloga dugo sam želela da pročitam ovu knjigu i ispostavilo se da će mi ona biti među omiljenim Kingovim pričama.

    Opisi likova i radnje, tačnije apsolutno svega što se dešava čine da sve teče toliko sporo da se u jednom trenutku zapitate zašto i čemu sve to. Sa druge stranje, upravo zbog te detaljnosti, sa likovima sam se povezala i vi

    Isuse Hriste na biciklu _________

    Nedeljama nakon čitanja ove knjige osećaj izmoždenosti i devastiranosti me ne napušta, utisak je i dalje prejak. Iz neobjašnjivih razloga dugo sam želela da pročitam ovu knjigu i ispostavilo se da će mi ona biti među omiljenim Kingovim pričama.

    Opisi likova i radnje, tačnije apsolutno svega što se dešava čine da sve teče toliko sporo da se u jednom trenutku zapitate zašto i čemu sve to. Sa druge stranje, upravo zbog te detaljnosti, sa likovima sam se povezala i više nego što bi trebalo. Nejasan je tačan trenutak u kojem počinje borba za život jer je zapravo opisan ceo proces u kojem nastupa užas. Cepanje dramskog vremena gde se stvara iluzija da događaj traje beskonačno iako je sve gotovo u manje od 48 sati vas potpuno sluđuje, dok pročitano ostaje sa vama i nakon što zaklopite korice.

    U osnovi, priča i likovi su potpuno tipični - tročlana porodica, dete je uvek dečak između 5 i 10 godina, dok je radnja u neku ruku i banalna. Svakako nije nikakva genijalština u pitanju kada govorimo o činiocima i o postavci radnje. Genijalan je način stvaranja suspenzije kod čitaoca, kao i njegovo pecanje različitim emotivnim udica,a. Ono što me je možda oduševilo više od svega jeste to što ova priča zapravo ima kraj.

  • helen the bookowl

    If you're looking for a creepy read, this is it. "Cujo" was written during a time in which Stephen King was doing drugs, and it was exactly for that reason that I wanted to read it.

    Cujo is a cute, however big, St. Bernhards dog, who one day gets bitten by a rabid bat. This incidence turns Cujo into monster who longs for food and no one can feel safe around this formerly beloved dog.

    The scenes with Cujo were nerve-wracking, but what I loved the most about this novel were the characters which we

    If you're looking for a creepy read, this is it. "Cujo" was written during a time in which Stephen King was doing drugs, and it was exactly for that reason that I wanted to read it.

    Cujo is a cute, however big, St. Bernhards dog, who one day gets bitten by a rabid bat. This incidence turns Cujo into monster who longs for food and no one can feel safe around this formerly beloved dog.

    The scenes with Cujo were nerve-wracking, but what I loved the most about this novel were the characters which we get to know very well. "Cujo" features children and adults who all find themselves in everyday situations when Cujo appears and makes their lives a living hell. I think that if you have a fear of rabid animals, this book will certainly hit you. To me personally, it wasn't the scariest book I've ever read, but it definitely contains some chapters and (car) scenes which will stick to my mind.


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